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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




11 00098 9901 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 




REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow19411945acto 



5etting ol Open Air J ires 

General Laws, Chapter 48, Section 13 as amended: 

"No person shall set, maintain or increase a fire in the open 
air at any time unless the ground is substantia^ covered with 
snow, except by written permission, covering a period not ex- 
ceeding five days from the date thereof, granted by the forest 
warden or chief of the fire department in cities and towns, or, in 
cities having such an official, the fire commissioner; provided, 
that no such permit shall be granted to be exercised during any 
portion of the months of April and May except upon rainy days; 
and provided, further, that persons over the age of twenty-one 
may, without a permit, set, maintain or increase a reasonable 
fire for the purpose of cooking, upon sandy or gravelly land free 
from U\dng or dead vegetation or upon sandy or rocky beaches 
bordering on tide water, if the fire is enclosed with rocks, metal 
or other non-inflammable material. The forest warden, chief or 
fire commissioner, as the case may be, may make it a condition 
for granting a permit that any burning shall be done only after 
four o'clock (eastern standard time) in the afternoon and he 
may revoke a permit at any time. The forester may make rules 
and regulations relating to the granting and revocation of sucli 
permits binding throughout the commonwealth. Such rules and 
regulations shall take effect subject to section tliirty-seven of 
chapter thirty, w-hen approved by the governor and council. The 
forest wardens in towns and officials performing the duties of 
forest wardens in cities shall cause public notice to be given of 
the provisions of this section and shall enforce the same. Who- 
ever violates any provision of this section shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than one hundred dollars or by imprisonment 
for not more than one month, or both." 

Incinerators are classed as open air fires. 



v^4^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1941 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




(joW 

Q 7 4^44- 
A /<rf 

ex. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 
1941 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS, Inc. 
Plymouth, Mass. 



REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY- 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



— 3— 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the transaction 
of town affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — ^Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the second day of March, 1942, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least 
before the second day of March. 

To bring in their votes on one ballot for the following 
town officers: 

Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of taxes, 
one selectman for three 3'ears; one assessor for three years; one 
member of the board of public welfare for three years; four 
constables for one year; one cemetery commissioner for three 
years; two members of the school committee for three years; 
one member of school committee for one year; one member of 
the board of health for three years; one trustee Memorial 
Library for three years, and a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 
8 o'clock p.m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Common- 
wealth to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, as 



aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall in said Acton on Monday, 
the ninth day of March, at 7:30 o'clock p.m. Then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

, Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town, and determine 
how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1942, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $230.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reim- 
bursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase additional seats for the 
Town Hall or act anything thereon. 



Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to continue the improvement of Main 
Street, from the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton; 
said money to be used in conjunction with any money which 
may be allotted by the State or County, or both, for this 
purpose; or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase and install directional 
signs or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to purchase and install a new 
heating system in the Town Hall or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to insure the High School Build- 
ing or act anything thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will accept as a town way 
or street, the laying out by the selectmen, of an extension of 
Maple Avenue, westerly about 341 feet to the house of Charles 
H. Liebfried, as shown on a plan filed in the office of the 
town clerk. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by 
law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, 
and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as 
assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of 
the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addi- 
tion thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G (6) (a) of 
the Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to purchase a cruiser equipped 
with two-way radio for the police department or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will accept Section 1, 
Chapter 85, General Laws as amended relative to bicycle 
registration. 



— 6— 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $300.00 for the maintenance of Jones 
Community Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) for the 
redemption of tax titles held by the town. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to transfer $750.00 
from the Machinery Fund t ) the Machinery Account, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to replace the present ladder truck 
in South Acton or act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to pay for fighting 
building fires and fix a price thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will be responsible for 
accidents caused by fire apparatus operators and to what 
extent. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the time 
of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this twenty-eighth day 
of January, 1942. 

JAMES E. KINSLEY, 
GEORGE A. MORSE, 
W. BURTON HARVEY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

A true copy. Attest: 

NORMAN L. PERKINS, 

Constable of Acton. 



— 7— 



Report of Finance Committee 

Your committee on Finance respectfully submits the 
following recommendations for appropriations for the en- 
suing year: 

General Government $7,200.00 

Bonds 251.50 

Buildings and Grounds 1,900.00 

Police Department 4,200.00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 900.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department 1,000.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Health Department 1,200.00 

Town Nurse, Salary and Expenses 2,200.00 

Highways, Village 1,450.00 

Highways, Chapter 81 8,550.00 

Highways, Chapter 90 2,000.00 

Snow Removal, Estimate 4,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,950.00 

Welfare 5,000.00 

State Aid 240.00 

Military Aid 300.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 18,000.00 

Education 52,000.00 

Library Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library Books 200.00 

Cemeteries 2,800.00 

Liability Insurance 800.00 

Memorial Day (Article 5) 250.00 

Expense Dog Officer (Article 8) 200.00 

Work Relief (Article 7) 200.00 

Jones Athletic Field (Article 18) 300.00 

Redemption Tax Titles (Article 19) 100.00 



— 8— 

Unclassified 400.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 400.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 100.00 

Notes and Bonds 1,905.33 

Soldiers' Relief 1,600.00 

Total $133,849.83 

Article No. 9. Recommend the appropriation of $250.00 for 
the purchase of additional seats for Town Hall. 

Article No. 10. Recommend we pass over the Article. 

Article' No. 11. Recommend we pass over the article. 

Article No. 12. Recommend the sum, not to exceed the 
amount of $2500.00, for installation of new heating system 
in Town Hall. 

Article No. 13. Recommend the High School Building be 
insured for $20,000.00 for the term of three or five years 
and a sufficient sum be appropriated to pay the premium. 

Article No. 16. Recommend the purchase of a cruiser car 
equipped with two-way radio for the Police Department 
and the sum of $1500.00 be raised and appropriated for this 
purpose. If article is accepted we suggest the appropri- 
ation for the Police Department be broken down as fol- 
lows: Chief's salary $1800.00, assistant $1550.00, operation 
expenses for cruiser $450.00, and general expense $400.00. 

Article No. 21. Recommend it be referred to a committee 
appointed by the Moderator. 

Article No. 22. Recommend this article be left with the Se- 
lectmen as has been the custom. 

Article No. 23. Recommend this article be referred to Town 
:; Council for opinion and report. 

Recommend that the amount of $1000.00 appropriated for 
Moth Department be expended for spraying only, no creo- 
soting. 



Recommend the sum of $2000.00 be appropriated from tlie 
Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 

The attention of the voters is respectfully directed to 
the situation which has arisen in regard to Article 26 of the 
Warrant for Annual Town Meeting of March 10, 1941, covering 
"purchase of a new power road grader." Under this article 
the Finance Committee "recommended no action at present." 
Furthermore the voters voted against the motion^ to purchase 
the machine. It is your committee's understanding that a 
power grader came into the possession of the Town during the 
month of April, 1941, and still is in its possession. 

Statement of Town Government appropriations for years 

1936 and 1941 to show comparison of expenditures with 1942 
Estimates. 

1936 1941 1942 
Highways: 

General Maintenance $12,000.00 $1,450.00 $1,450.00 

Chapter 81 8,550.00 8,550.00 

Chapter 90 2,000.00 2,000.00 

General Government 5,500.00 7,000.00 7,200.00 

Bonds 1,000.00 251.50 251.50 

Notes and Bonds 4,000.00 1,000.00 1,905.33 

Building and Grounds 1,500.00 1,500.00 1,900.00 

Police Dept 2,500.00 4,200.00 4,200.00 

Fire Dept 2,800.00 2,800.00 2,800.00 

Forest Fires 500.00 500.00 900.00 

Hydrant Service 3,079.00 3,428.00 3,453.00 

Moth Dept 1,700.00 1,200.00 1,000.00 

Tree Warden none 1,000.00 500.00 

Health Dept 1,000.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Town Nurse 2,200.00 2,200.00 2,200.00 

Snow Removal 4,700.00 5,000.00 4,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,000.00 3,950.00 3,950.00 

Welfare 8,500.00 5,500.00 5,000.00 

State Aid 500.00 240.00 240.00 

Military Aid 200.00 600.00 300.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,300.00 2,000.00 



—10— 

Old Age Assistance 9,000.00 15,500.00 18,000.00 

Education . 46,000.00 47,000.00 52,000.00 

Library Maintenance 800.00 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Library Books 200.00 200.00 200.00 

Cemeteries 800.00 2,500.00 2,800.00 

Insurance Liability 1,000.00 800.00 800.00 

Memorial Day 275.00 250.00 250.00 

Expense Dog Officer 200.00 200.00 

Work Relief • 500.00 200.00 

Redemption Tax Titles 100.00 100.00 

Jones Athletic Field 300.00 300.00 

Unclassified 400.00 400.00 400.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds . 1,000.00 200.00 400.00 

Interest Revenue Loans 2,000.00 150.00 100.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,500.00 1,600.00 1,600.00 



Precinct 1. Alden C. Flagg, W. Stuart Allen 
Precinct 2. William T. Merriam, Henry E. Tolman 
Precinct 3. Webster S. Blanchard, Porter Jenks 

Finance Committee 



—11— 



Town Officers 



Moderator 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

James E. Kinsley Term expires 1942 

W. Burton Harvey Term expires 1943 

George A. Morse Term expires 1944 

Town Clerk 

Harlan E. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Henry L. Haynes Term expires 1942 

Carl C. Flint Term expires 1943 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1944 

Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Carl E. Backman Term expires 1942 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1943 

Raymond L, Hatch Term expires 1944 

Constables 

Samuel E. Knowlton Robert G. Willett 

Ivar Peterson Norman L. Perkins 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Wendell F. Davis Term expires 1942 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1943 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1944 



—12— 

School Committee 

*Avis Howe Term expires 1942 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1942 

Fannie E. Davis Term expires 1943 

fEverett N. Montague Term expires 1943 

Hazel O. Bundy Term expires 1944 

Walter B. Stevens Term expires 1944 

JRobert C. Hall 

§Edward A. Schmitz 

^Resigned fResigned 

{Elected to replace * §Elected to replace f 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1942 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1943 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1944 

Board of Health 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1942 

O. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1943 

Lillian E. Taylor Term expires 1944 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1942 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1943 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1944 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1942 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1943 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1944 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1942 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1943 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1944 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1942 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1943 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1944 



—13- 



Appointments Made By Selectmen — 1941 

Executive Clerk 

Virginia Milbery 

Office: Town Hall Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30; 

Board of Public Welfare, Monday evenings at 7:00. 

Finance Committee 

W. Stuart Allen Henry E. Tolman 

Alden C. Flagg Webster S. Blanchard 

William T. Merriam Porter G. Jenks 

Superintendent of Streets 

William C. Kazokas 

Town Accountant 

Howard L. Jones Term expires 1944 

Registrars of Voters 

William B. Feely Term expires 1942 

Walter L. O'Neil Term expires 1943 

Arthur Lee Term expires 1944 

Harlan E.Tuttle Ex-Officio 

Election Officers 

— Precinct I — 
Warden, — James W. Coughlin 
Clerk — James A. Wayne 
Inspector — Samuel E. Knowlton 
Inspector — Paul A. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — George E. Murphy 
Deputy. Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — Ralph L. Rogers 
Deputy Inspector — Leo T. McCarthy 
Teller— Louisa N. Wood 
Teller— Alice M. Duren 



—14— 

— Precinct II — 
Warden — Clarence Robbins 
Clerk — Grace J. Cullinane 
Inspector — Merle M. Hayward 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — David Clayton 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas M. Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Henry L. Capelle 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph H. Lemoine 
Teller — Pauline Bursaw 
Teller— John J. Bradley 

— Precinct III — 
Warden — Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Peter J. Duggan 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Katherine M. Kinsley 
Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk — Charles A. Byron 
Deputy Inspector — Harry E. Holt 
Deputy Inspector — Mary Laffin 
Teller — Margaret F. Leveroni 
Teller— Marion C. Reed 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 

Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Clare A. Milbery 



—15— 

Town Forest Committee 

James J. Knight Term expires 1942 

Albert R. Jenks Term expires 1943 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1944 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Bertram D. Hall George H. Reed Charles E. Smith 

Field Drivers 

Norman E. Livermore Robert G. Willett Norman L. Perkins 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James J. Knight 

Police Officers 

*Michael Foley, Chief 
Norman L. Perkins Robert G. Willett 

*Civil Service — Permanent 

Burial Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Soldier's Relief Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 

*Eden Cahill fOsgood Tuttle 

^Deceased fAppointed to replace * 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 

Howard L. Jones 

Public Weighers 

George H. Reed Alfred Davis, Jr. 

William Braman G, Howard Reed 

A. W. Davis W. H. Francis Davis 

M. B. Ferber Thomas Hearon 

Philip Newell Fred Stone 

Willard Houghton Albert S. Braman 

W. H. Soar Clarence E. Braman 

Peter Olsen, Jr. Harold Whitney 

Gerald Davis William Kane 

Charles Clark Edward Hellier 

John William Davis 



-16- 



Selectmen's Report 



We submit, herewith, the reports of the various depart- 
ments of the town for the year ending December 31, 1941. Also, 
all of the action under the different articles voted at the last 
annual Town Meeting and the Special Town Meeting. 

Article 23 

The Town Hall was painted on the outside, and the two 
inside entrance halls were also painted under the amount 
voted. 

Article 24 

The Board purchased two hundred seats for the Town Hall, 
and recommends an appropriation for the purchase of an addi- 
tional one hundred seats. 

Article 25 

The committee appointed by the Moderator join with the 
Board in recommending no action on a highway building due 
to war conditions. 

Article 27 

The Board appointed Norman L. Perkins a full time police 
officer, and he has made an efficient public employee. The 
additional officer provides full time police service to the town. 

Article 30 

The Town received no allotment for School Street. 

Article 33 

The street signs were installed, but the directional signs 
were not purchased. 

Lieut. T. Charles Gallagher has formed an Acton Com- 
pany of the auxiliary state guard, and the Board expresses to 
liieut. Gallagher and his men the appreciation of the town. 



—17— 

We also extend to all those citizens of the town who have 
engaged in civilian defense activities the appreciation of the 
Board. 

The Board recommends the installation of a new heating 
system in the Town Hall, as the present system is a problem of 
maintenance. 

The Board strongly urges economy at the annual meeting, 
as the town faces a decrease in revenue and an increased 
expense in conducting the regular department activities due 
to war conditions. . ,_.. 

We thank the different officers and committees of the town 
for doing their part in carrying out their work in the different 
departments of the town. 

JAMES E. KINSLEY 
GEORGE A. MORSE 
W. BURTON HARVEY 



18- 



Town Meetings 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town 
Meeting, March 10, 1941 



Art. 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose Clara L. Sawyer trustee of the Elizabeth White 
Fund for three years. 

Chose Arnold H. Perkins trustee of the West Acton Fire- 
men's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Frederick T. Kennedy trustee of the Acton Fire- 
men's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Charles E. Smith trustee of the Goodnow Fund for 
three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
thousand dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Selectmen 
be three hundred dollars per annum and the other members 
two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salaries of the Assessors be nine hundred 
dollars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned as they 
may determine. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk fifteen 
dollars and the other member ten dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars per 
annum and that of the other members seventy-five dollars each 
per annum and that a member of the Board of Public Welfare 



—19— 

shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assistance and that the 
expense of administering this assistance such as necessary- 
supplies, salary and traveling expense of said supervisor shall 
not exceed the amount provided for this purpose by the 
Federal Government. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen dollars 
for the annual meeting and ten dollars for special meetings. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hundred 
dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Accountant be five 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to fix the 
salaries of all other town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Voted: To accept the several reports of town officers. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any commit- 
tees chosen at any prevfious meeting that have not already 
reported. 

No action taken under this article. 

The following resolution was presented by James E. 
Kinsley and Voted unanimously. Whereas Horace F. Tuttle 
is retiring from the office of town clerk after serving forty- 
six years. 

Resolved, That we express our appreciation of his loyal 
and faithful service. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and determine 
how the same shall be raised. 



—20— 

Under this and other articles in the warrant it was voted 
to appropriate and raise by taxation for: 

General Government $7,000.00 

Bonds— Art. 9 251.50 

Building and Grounds 1,500.00 

Police Department 4,200.00 

Fire Department —Art. 6 2,800.00 

Forest Fire— Art. 7 r 500.00 

Fire Alarm— Art. 32 2,205.00 

Hydrant Service 3,428.00 

Moth Department— Art. 17 1,200.00 

Tree Warden— Art. 18 1,000.00 

Health Department 1,200.00 

Town Nurse— Art. 11, Salary 2,000.00 

Town Nurse— Art. 11, Expenses 200.00 

Highway— Village 1,450.00 

Highway— Chap. 81 8,550.00 

Highway— Chap. 90 2,000.00 

Snow Removal, Estimated 6,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,950.00 

Public Welfare 5,500.00 

State Aid 240.00 

Military Aid 600.00 

Soldiers' Relief . 1,600.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,300.00 

Old Age Assistance 15,500.00 

Dept. of Education, Schools 47,000.00 

Library, Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library, Books 200.00 

Cemeteries 2,500.00 

Liability Insurance —Art. 8 800.00 

Memorial Day— Art. 5 250.00 

Dog Officer— Art. 22 200.00 

Work Relief— Art. 12 500.00 

Redemption of Tax Titles— Art. 20 100.00 

Jones Field, Athletic— Art. 16 300.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 200.00 



—21— 

Interest on Revenue Loans 150.00 

Notes and Bonds 1,000.00 

Middlesex County Hospital, Maintenance — Art. 15 944.26 

Fire Dept., New Fire Hose— Art. 13 800.00 

Fire Dept.— New Forest Fire Hose 400.00 

Unpaid Bills— (Art. 21 for the year 1940) 98.68 

Art. 23— Painting Town Hall 600.00 

Art. 24— New Seats, Town Hall 500.00 

Art. 28— North Main St 2,250.00 

Art. 30— School St., S. Acton 1,000.00 

Art. 33 & 37— Installing Street Signs 800.00 

Art. 34— Cemeteries (Shade Trees) 300.00 

Art. 36— Addition to High School 3,500.00 

Art. 31 — Transfer from Machinery Fund to Ma- 
chinery Account 851.52 

Overlay Surplus Acct. for Reserve Fund 2,000.00 



$144,318.96 



Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
and fifty dollars. 

Art. 6. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire depart- 
ment, or vote anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-eight 
hundred dollars. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will pay for fighting brush fires 
and fix a price thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred dollars for fighting 
brush fires and that the price for services and labor be fixed at 
fifty cents per hour for firemen, sixty cents per hour for Deputy 
Forest Warden and seventy-five cents per hour for the Forest 
Warden. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 



—22— 

priate a sum of money to insure the employees of the town or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of eight hundred 
dollars for liability insurance. 

Art. 9. To see what amount of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the payment of premiums on all 
town officers' bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate two hundred fifty-one 
dollars and fifty cents ($251.50) for the payment of premiums 
on all bonds of town officials. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1941, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted unanimously: That the town treasurer, with the 
approval of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning January 1, 1941, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one yeai 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to employ a public 
health nurse, and raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
maintenance of same. 

Voted: To employ a public health nurse to be under the 
direction of the Board of Health and to appropriate two thou- 
sand dollars for the salary of said nurse and two hundred dol- 
lars for maintenance. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund or act any- 
thing thereon. 



—23— 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of five hundred 
dollars ($500.00). 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of eight hundred dollars ($800.00) or any other 
sum to purchase new fire hose. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of eight hundred 
($800.00) dollars to purchase new 2V2-inch fire hose. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase new forest fire hose or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of four hundred 
($400.00) to purchase new forest fire hose. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required by 
law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, maintenance, 
and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hospital, as 
assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 111 of 
the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and in addi- 
tion thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G (6) (a) of 
the Acts of 1936, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of nine hundred 
forty-four and 26/100 ($944.26) dollars to meet the assessment 
made on the town for the purpose mentioned in this article. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of ($300.00) for the maintenance of Jones Com- 
munity Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate three hundred ($300.00) 
dollars for the maintenance of Jones Community Field, South 
Acton. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $1,200.00 or any other sum for the suppression 
of brown-tail and gypsy moths or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,200.00 for 
the suppression of brown-tail and gypsy moths. 



—24— 

•• Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the care of shade trees or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00; 
$800.00 for shade trees and $200.00 for feeding trees and setting 
out new trees. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of two hundred ($200.00) dollars or any other 
sum to be used by the Town Forest Committee for the purpose 
of purchasing additional forest land, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of one hundred dollars ($100.00) for the re- 
demption of tax titles held by the town. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of one hundred 
dollars ($100.00) for the redemption of tax titles held by the 
town. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills for 
1940, or do or act anything thereon. 

General Government $46.00 

Board of Health 26.25 

Fire Department 6.43 

$78.68 

Also 1939 unpaid bills General Government 20.00 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of ninety-eight 
and ,68/100 dollars ($98.68) to pay the unpaid bills referred to 
in this article. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $230.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay the 
expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be reimbursed 
for the .amount spent, by the County of Middlesex, or act any- 
thing thereon. 



—25— 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $200.00 to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to paint the Town Hall or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $600.00 for 
painting the Town Hall. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase settees for the Town Hall 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 for 
purchasing new seats for Town Hall. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
piate a sum of money to purchase a plot of land and erect a 
building thereon for the use of the highway department or 
act anything thereon. 

Motion: That there be appropriated the sum of six 
thousand dollars ($6000.00) for the purchase of a plot of land 
and the erection of a building thereon for the use of the high- 
way department, and to meet said appropriation there be 
raised in the tax levy of 1941 the sum of fifteen hundred dollars 
and that the treasurer with the approval of the selectmen be 
authorized to borrow the sum of forty-five hundred dollars 
($4500.00) , and issue notes therefor payable in accordance 
with Chapter 44, General Laws; so that the whole loan shall 
be paid in not more than five years. 

The motion did not prevail. 

Voted: That the moderator appoint a committee of three, 
one from each precinct, to act with the Selectmen to look into 
the matter of the purchase of a plot of land and the erection 
of a building thereon for the use of the highway department 
and to report at the next annual town meeting. The moder- 
ator appointed: Howard J. Billings, Albert R. Jenks and Allen 
G. Moody a committee. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 



—26— 

priate a sum of money to purchase a new power road grader 
or act anything thereon. 

Motion: That there be appropriated the sum of seventy- 
five hundred dollars ($7500.00) for the puchase of a power road 
grader and to meet the said appropriation, there be raised in the 
tax levy of 1941 the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1500.00) 
and that the treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be 
authorized to borrow the sum of six thousand dollars 
($6000.00) , and to issue notes therefor payable in accordance 
with Chapter 44, General Laws; so that the whole loan shall 
be paid in not more than five years. 

This motion did not prevail. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to appoint an additional full time police 
officer or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint an 
additional full time police officer. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to continue the improvement of Main 
Street, from the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton : 
said money to be used in conjunction with any money which 
may be allotted by the State or County; or both, for this pur- 
pose; or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty-two 
hundred and fifty dollars ($2250.00) to continue the improve- 
ment of Main Street, from Carlisle line to the State Road in 
East Acton; said money to be used in conjunction with any 
money which may be allotted by the State or County, or both 
for this purpose. 

Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to repair and widen Main Street from 
Route 2 to the Maynard line; said money to be used in con- 
junction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 



—27— 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the specific repairs and widenings 
of School Street, South Acton, said money to be used in con- 
junction with any money which may be allotted by the State 
or County, or both, for this purpose; or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate one thousand dollars 
($1000.00) for specific repairs and widenings of School Street, 
South Acton, said money to be used in conjunction with any 
money which may be allotted by the State or County, or both, 
for this purpose. 

Voted: That the appropriation be transferred to the con- 
struction of Main Street provided the State and County will 
approve of said transfer. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will vote to transfer $1000.00 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer $851.52 from the Machinery Fund to 
the Machinery Account and to include the purchase of a road 
grader. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,205.00 to complete the fire alarm system 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,205.00 to 
complete the fire alarm system. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase and install directional and 
street signs or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That article 33 and article 37 be acted upon jointly. 

Voted: "To raise and appropriate the sum of eight hun- 
dred dollars ($800.00) to purchase and install directional and 
street signs and to assign numbers of dwellings, business estab- 
lishments, and public buildings upon the streets of the town." 

Art. 34. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 



—28— 

priate the sum of three hundred dollars ($300.00) or any other 
sum to be used for pruning damaged trees in the cemeteries 
of the town or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of three hundred 
dollars ($300.00) to be used for pruning damaged trees in the 
cemeteries of the town. 

Art. 35. To see what action the town will take in regard 
to changing the name of School Street, West Acton, to Gates 
Road or any other suitable name, or act anything thereon. 

A motion that the street in West Acton called School 
Street be changed and the name Durkee Street be substituted 
therefor did not prevail. 

Art. 36. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate $19,500.00 for the building of two wings at the rear of 
the present high school, in order to provide locker and shower 
rooms, drawing room, new typewriting room, new nurse's 
room, and all necessary original equipment, and to make nec- 
essary alterations in the present building to provide for a 
larger mechanics arts department, and to meet said appropri- 
ation the sum of $3,500.00 shall be raised in the tax levy of the 
current year, $2,500.00 of said amount being for remodeling or 
changing the present building, and the treasurer with the 
selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow $16,000.00 
and issue bonds or notes of the town therefor according to the 
provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. Said bonds or notes 
shall be due and payable in not more than sixteen years. The 
amount appropriated shall be expended under the direction of 
the Special Committee appointed by the moderator in 1940 and 
School Committee; pass any votes or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted unanimously: To raise and appropriate $19,500.00 
for the building of two wings at the rear of the present high 
school, in order to provide locker and shower rooms, drawing 
room, new typewriting room, new nurse's room, and all neces- 
sary original equipment, and to make necessary alterations in 
the present building to provide for a larger mechanics arts 



—29— 

department, and to meet said appropriation the sum of 
$3,500.00 shall be raised in the tax levy of the current year, 
$2,500.00 of said amount being for remodeling or changing the 
present building, and the treasurer with the selectmen be and 
hereby is authorized to borrow $16,000.00 and issue bonds or 
notes of the town therefor according to the provisions of Chap- 
ter 44, General Laws. Said bonds or notes shall be due and 
payable in not more than sixteen years. The amount appro- 
priated shall be expended under the direction of the Special 
Committee appointed by the modeator in 1940 and the School 
Committee. 

Art. 37 To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the erection of guide posts and 
boards at intersections of School and River Street; School 
Street and Laws Brook Road; and School Street and Route No. 
Ill or take any action thereon. 

Action under this article recorded under article 33. 

Art. 38. To see if the town will rescind the vote passed 
at their meeting, March 30, 1941, whereby they voted to accept 
the provisions of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of 1907 
relative to the election of a highway survyeor, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 39. To see if the town will vote to hereafter elect a 
highway surveyor by ballot, as provided for in Chapter 41, 
Section 1, of the General Laws of 1921. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



—30— 

Abslract of the Proceedings of the Special Town 
Meeting, December 29, 1941 



Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for General Government by borrowing 
under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer from available 
funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, that the sum of two hundred fifty 
dollars ($250.00) be transferred from the Surplus Revenue for 
General Government in 1941. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for Buildings and Grounds by borrow- 
ing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer from avail- 
able funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, that the sum of seventy-five dollars 
($75.00) be transferred from the Surplus Revenue for Build- 
ings and Grounds in the year 1941. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the use of the Fire Department by 
borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer 
from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously that the sum of three thousand sev- 
enty-five dollars ($3075.00) be transferred from the Surplus 
Revenue for the use of the Fire Department. Three thousand 
dollars to be spent for fire hose in 1941 and 1942. Seventy-five 
dollars ($75.00) for maintenance in the year 1941. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for Forest Fires by borrowing under 
Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, that the sum of thirty-two and 
15/100 dollars ($32.15) be transferred from Surplus Revenue 
for Forest Fires in the year 1941. 



—Si- 
Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the use of the School Department 
by borrowing under Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer 
from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, that the sum of one hundred twenty- 
five dollars ($125.00) be transferred from Surplus Revenue for 
the use of the School Department in the year 1941. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for Soldiers' Relief by borrowing under 
Chapter 58 of the Acts of 1938 or transfer from available funds. 

Voted: To pass over the Article. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Acton Committee on Public 
Safety by borrowing under Chapter 487 of the Acts of 1941 or 
transfer from available funds. 

Voted: Unanimously, that the sum of forty-three hundred 
fifty dollars ($4350.00) be transferred from the Surplus Rev- 
enue Account for the Committee on Public Safety; thirteen 
hundred fifty dollars for immediate expenses to be set up as 
follows: 

State Guard Reserve Equipment $675.00 

First Aid Station Equipment 475.00 

Air Raid Warden's First Aid Kits 50.00 • 

First Aid Station Extra Equipment 50.00 

Defense Headquarters 100.00 

and three thousand dollars ($3000.00) for reserve in case of 

emergency to be used in 1941 and 1942. 

On Motion, Voted to adjourn. 



—32— 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 

Whole number recorded ' 59 

Born in Acton 4 Native parentage 50 

Males 31 Foreign parentage 1 

Females 28 Mixed parentage 8 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 44 

Residents of Acton 46 Residents of other places 42 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 39 

Residents of Acton 36 Residents of other places 3 

Occurring in Acton . 26 Occurring in other places 13 

Average Age in Years, 66+ 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



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—40— 



Date 

Nov. 17 

June 28 

Nov. 2 

July 29 

May 5 

Pec: 4 

Aug. 3 

May 11 

Nov. 13 

Sept. 28 

April 24 

Jan. 26 

Mar. 20 

Mar. 20 

Aug. 27 

Jan. 10 

Jan. 20 

Jan. 23 

June 24 

Feb. 25 

June 10; 

July 9 

Sept. 10 

Feb. 25 

June 18 

Oct. 4 

May 28 

Feb. 3!' 

Jan. 21, 

,May 4i 

JDec. 30 

JMay 1 

tOct. 24 

J Jan. 4 : 

iNov. 17' 

Feb. 13 

Mar. 20 

June 8 



Deaths Registered in 1941 



Name 


Years 


Mos. 


Days 


Allard, Marie 


82 


7 


3 


Berr3% Charles Porter 


82 


8 


19 


Best, Harriet K. (Pike) 


82 






Cahill, Eden W. 


43 




21 


Caldwell, Sarah A. (Comery) 


71 


2 


18 


Cameron, Chri^stine H. 


75 






Craig, David Anthony 


4 


8 


8 


Curran, John Angus 


41 


9 


7 


Davis, Lucy Catherine 


96 


2 




DeSouza, Joseph J. 


69 


8 


8 


Dingee, John S. C. 


66 


10 


14 


Evans, Ida Charlotte 


71 


6 


8 


Fisher, Charles W. 


65 


9 


25 


Gardiner, Horace A. 


68 


11 


17 


Hall, Isabelle H. 


72 


2 


2 


Heath, Mary Ann 


69 






Hall, Walter F. 


53 


8 


14 


Law, Edith B. 


69 






Leavitt, Lizzie A. (Stevens) 


83 


5 


11 


Livermore, Elliot P. 


74 






MacKenzie, Ellen Flynn 


78 


2 


19 


McDonald, Frederick W. 


73 


8 


11 


Mead, Albertie M. 


71 




6 


Meldrum, Enid H. 


23 


4 


9 


Morrissey, Clarence James 


64 






Newell, Dorothy (Calley) 


43 


5 


5 


Olsen, Simon 


65 


5 


9 


Petrakuk, Joseph 


46 






Pierce, Isabel Florence 


56 


7 


2 


Pinolehto, John M. 


65 


8 




Rogers, Frank Seymour 


74 


9 


16 


Seppaia, Anne M. 


68 


4 


21 


Stearns, Clifton Sawyer 


68 


6 


21 


Taylor, Adelaide Tuttle 


84 


10 


28 


Taylor, Mary (Hogan) 


83 


8 




Turner, Clara M. 


88 




29 


Tuttle, Carrie E. (Taylor) 


65 


11 


18 


Tuttle, Edith G. 


75 


1 


23 



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—43— 



List of Persons Having Dogs Licensed 
in 1941 



Addy, Mrs. Winthrop $2.00 

Allen, W. Stuart 2.00 

Allen, H. Vaughn 2.00 

Anderson, Hilda 5.00 

Avery, Lee 2.00 

Baker, James W 7.00 

Balsor, Vesta L 2.00 

Bancroft, Clesson A. 5.00 

Barr, Robert 2.00 

Barry, David A 2.00 

Bean, Mrs. Forrest 5.00 

Bean, Priscilla 5.00 

Beach, Flora A 2.00 

Benere, Antonia 2.00 

Bennett, Herbert W. 2.00 

Best, Helen R 5.00 

Billings, Howard J 2.00 

Bird, Fred 2.00 

Blanchard, Hazel G. 2.00 

Boatman, Dewey E. 2.00 

Bowen, Robert M 4.00 

Bowman, Herbert E. 2.00 

Bradley, John J 5.00 

Bradley, William 2.00 

Braman, Frank S 12.00 

Briggs, Curtis 2.00 

Brown, Arthur P 2.00 

Bursaw, Pauline 2.00 

Byers, John B 2.00 

Cahill, William 2.00 

Caldwell, Hazel 2.00 

Campbell, L. H 2.00 

Carlson, Christian 2.00 



Chaffin, Nancy S 2.00 

Chamberlain, Henry F. 7.00 

Charles, Will A 2.00 

Clark, O. Lawrence 2.00 

Cloutier, Joseph 2.00 

Conant, Charlotte 2.00 

Connolly, James H 2.00 

Conquest, Arlene and 

Gladys 2.00 

Conquest, Arthur 2.00 

Conquest, Thomas 2.00 

Cornwall, Paul 2.00 

Costello, Edwin 2.00 

Costello, Timothy 2.00 

Coughlin, Mary 2.00 

Cram, Lois M 2.00 

Creeley, Mrs. Genevieve 2.00 

Crosby, William C 5.00 

Cullinane, C. C 2.00 

Curtis, Clinton S 4.00 

Davis, Charles E 2.00 

Davis, Edith V 25.00 

Davis, Wendell F 4.00 

Derby, Benjamin 2.00 

DeSouza, Joseph 2.00 

DiDuca, Vincent 2.00 

Dingee, Alton 2.00 

Drury, William C 4.00 

Duggan, Elizabeth A. 2.00 

Duggan, John J 2.00 

Durkee, Albert W 2.00 

Emerson, William I. 2.00 

Engman, J. Henry 2.00 



44- 



Enneguess, John 2.00 

Erickson, George 4.00 

Espie, James E 2.00 

Farley, Charles J 14.00 

Farrar, James 5.00 

Farquhar, Stuart 5.00 

Feltus, Carrol 2.00 

Fisher, Edith 2.00 

Flagg, Alden C 2.00 

Flagg, Alden C, Jr. ... 2.00 

Fletcher, John L 2.00 

Flint, Carl 2.00 

Flint, Marjorie S 5.00 

Flerra, Louis 2.00 

Forbes, Edward L 4.00 

Freeman, George 2.00 

Freeman, Harold R 2.00 

Freeman, William H. . . 2.00 

Fullonton, Llewellyn . 2.00 

Fullonton, Malcolm . . . 2.00 

Eraser, Arthur 50.00 

Frazier, Bernice 2.00 

Gallagher, Margaret . , . 2.00 

Gallant, Mildred 2.00 

Gatchell, Herman H. 2.00 

Gates, Paul 2.00 

Gibbs, Harry F 5.00 

Gleason, Mrs. Jennie . 2.00 

Godfrey, Carl R 2.00 

Goward, Hannah C. . . . 5.00 

Gowen, Elmer F 2.00 

Gravelin, A. C 2.00 

Gray, Charles E 10.00 

Hall, Charlotte D. ..... 2.00 

Hall, Mrs. E. A. ....... 2.00 

Hall, Robert C 2.00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Harvey, W. Burton , . 2.00 

Hatch, Raymond L 2.00 



Hayes, Fred C. . 2.00 

Hayes, Marion F 2.00 

Haynes, Henry L 2.00 

Hayward, Lucille 2.00 

High, W. J 2.00 

Holland, Hope C 2.00 

Holden, Grace B. 2.00 

Hopkins, Frederick .... 9.00 

Hollowell, Norman .... 5.00 

Howe, Chellis F 2.00 

Hunnewell, Charles W. 2.00 

Hutchinson, John W. . . 10.00 

Ineson, Benjamin 1 2.00 

Jack, William M 2.00 

Jalonen, Arthur 4.00 

Jenks, Albert R 2.00 

Johnson, Mrs. A. E 2.00 

Jones, Blanche 5.00 

Jones, Karl R 2.00 

Jones, Howard L 2.00 

Jules, Alfred V 2.00 

Jung, Herbert 2.00 

Kansanniva, K 2.00 

Kazohas, C 2.00 

Kennie, Lloyd 2.00 

Kelley, Chester E 2.00 

Kilmartin, Flora G 7.00 

Kimball, Elnathan J. 4.00 

King, Benjamin A 2.00 

King, William E. 2.00 

Kunelius, Arthur 7.00 

LaRoche, Arthur 2.00 

Leusher, Herbert L. 2.00 

Libbey, Richard H 2.00 

Liebfried, Charles H. 2.00 

Liebfried, George F. 5.00 

Litchard, Donald B 2.00 

Littlefield, Ralph F 2.00 

Livermore, Pearl R. 2.00 



—45— 



Livermore, Roland 10.00 

Lockwood, Ralph H. .. . 2.00 

Lothrop, Mary H 5.00 

Lowden, Richard A. 2.00 

MacKinnon, F. Roy . 2.00 

Mahoney, James 4.00 

Manter, CD 2.00 

Marsh, A. W 2.00 

Marshall, W. Lawrence, 

Jr 7.00 

Mason, Roger 2.00 

Massie, Wilham A 2.00 

Maynes, Everett M 2.00 

McCabe, Richard S 2.00 

McCarthy, Leo 2.00 

McClure, Jennie 4.00 

McGreen, Sherman . 2.00 

McKelvie, Arthur 5.00 

Mead, Francis V 2.00 

Mead, Hobart 2.00 

Mel, Eleanor 2.00 

Merry, Frances 2.00 

Milbery, Virginia 2.00 

Miller, Orson K 5.00 

Mills, Myra Zeta 2.00 

Montague, Everett N. . 2.00 

Moody, Allan G 2.00 

Moore, Mildred Pope 4.00 

Morehead, Lucy 2.00 

Murgatroyd, James ... 5.00 

Murphy, John E 5.00 

Murray, Margaret 2.00 

Mullen, James J. 2.00 

Nealey, Mrs. Edward . . 2.00 

Nelson, Emery 2.00 

Nelson, Arthur W 2.00 

Nichols, Orla 2.00 

Nicholson, Russell 2.00 

Nickerson, Albert M. 2.00 



Nicola, Harold 2.00 

Niles, V. R 2.00 

Nugent, Joseph 2.00 

Oliver, Hazel W 2.00 

Onslow, John 2.00 

Parks, Milton G 2.00 

Parsons, Mrs. Elsie 2.00 

Parsons, Mrs. Norman 2.00 

Pederson, Ingeborg 4.00 

Pendergast, Edward L. 2.00 

Penney, David F. 4.00 

Penney, Marie 5.00 

Perkins, A. Hazeltine 2.00 

Perkins, Edgar A 2.00 

Perkins, LaForrest 2.00 

Perry, Tony 2.00 

Peterson, Ruth 2.00 

Peterson, Edwin 2.00 

Peetingell, J. M 2.00 

Pickard, Cyrus W 2.00 

Piper, Elliott 4.00 

Prindle, Anne 2.00 

Pratt, Herbert T 2.00 

Prowse, Walter L 2.00 

Putnam, F. Wendell . . 2,00 

Quinn, Leo F 2.00 

Raymond, Barbara . 5.00 

Raymond, George J. . . 2.00 

Reed, Margaret 2.00 

Reed, Willis 2.00 

Reynolds, Arthur 5.00 

Roche, Frank 2.00 

Roche, Lawrence C. . 2.00 

Rhodes, Robert F 2.00 

Richards, Fred 2.00 

Rifford, Jeannette 2.00 

Roe, George 2.00 

Robbins, Ethel C 2.00 

Robbins, Walter A 2.00 



—46— 



Rugg, George 2.00 

Saarinen, Hugo 5.00 

Scanlon, Ruth H 2.00 

Schofield, Clifford A. . . 2.00 

Shapley, Eva C 2.00 

Sibel, J. E 2.00 

Simeone, Frank 2.00 

Simeone, Modesto ^ 2.00 

Smith, Ralph I * 2.00 

Soar, Henry 2.00 

Staples, Howard R 2.00 

Stiles, Gertrude 2.00 

Stevens, John N., Jr. . 2.00 

Stevens, Walter B 2.00 

Stoney, Mrs. R 4.00 

Stuart, Leslie E 2.00 

Sweet, Charles R 2.00 

Taylor, Charles P 2.00 

Taylor, Lillian L 2.00 

Taylor, Simon D 2.00 

Tervo, Albert 4.00 

Thompson, Harold C. . . 2.00 

Todd, Ethel 12.00 



Tolman, Wilbur J 5.00 

Tompkins, Elizabeth . 5.00 

Towne, Roger P 2.00 

Tracy, Alfred H 2.00 

Tuttle, Osgood 5.00 

Tuttle, Pauline G 2.00 

Veasie, Stanley R 2.00 

Wait, Albert F 2.00 

Walker, W. Gardner . . . 2.00 

Walsh, Michael J 2.00 

Waluk, John 2.00 

Ward, Francis 2.00 

Watkins, John 2.00 

Wayne, Burton H 2.00 

Wells, Carrie F 2.00 

Welsh, James 2.00 

White, George 2.00 

Whitcomb, R. S 2.00 

Whouley, Francis 2.00 

Willett, Fred W 2.00 

Wilson, Arnold 2.00 

Wise, Glenna 2.00 

Wood, Olivia 2.00 



256 licenses at $2.00 $512.00 

44 licenses at 5.00 220.00 

1 license at 25.00 25.00 

1 license at 50.00 50.00 



Deduct fees 302 licenses at 20 cents 
Paid to Town Treasurer 



$807.00 
60.40 

$746.60 



NOTICE 

All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the owners 
or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of time of year ownership is acquired. 
No tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



—47— 



Jury List Revised — 1941 



Precinct 1 

Roy S. Whitcomb, Cen. Main St. 
Robert C. Hall, Cen. Main St. 
George E. Murphy, Great Rd. 
W. Burton Harvey, Woodbury Lane 
Norman E. Livermore, Cen. Main St. 
Charles H. Liebfried, Maple Ave. 
Kenneth E. Jewell, Woodbury Lane 
Iner Peterson, Maple Ave. 
Clarence A. Frost, Newtown Rd. 

Precinct 2 

Arthur Eraser, Massachusetts Ave. 
Hugh C. Hodgen, Liberty St. 
George K. Hayward, Main St. 
Wesley P. Wilmot, Liberty St. 
Richard Lowden, Main St. 
James J. Knight, School St. 
David Clayton, Main St. 
Timothy J. Hennessey, Prospect St. 
Ralph W. Piper, Piper Rd. 

Precinct 3 

Porter G. Jenks, Central St. 
Chailes A. Byron, Arlington St. 
Everett B. Coolidge, Windsor Ave. 
Orla E. Nichols, Kinsley Rd. 
James B. Wilson, Arlington St. 
Allan C. Cameron, School St. 
Waldo J. Fhnt, Church St. 
Louis A. Flerra, Central St. 
Warren L. Davis, Massachusetts Ave. 



—48— 



Report on the Assignment of 
Street Numbers 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

This is the initial report of the committee which was 
appointed during the latter part of 1941 to proceed with the 
duty of assigning street numbers within the town. The work 
of installing directional and street signs was authorized at the 
annual town, meeting, under articles 33 and 37 which were 
amended to include the assignment of numbers. 

Despite the almost universal extent to which streets are 
numbered in most communities, no prepared information has 
yet been found to indicate how other towns or cities have 
approached their own individual numbering problems. It is 
evident that in newer cities, where all streets have been laid 
out at right angles, a uniform method of numbering can easily 
be adopted, but in older communities the problem is much 
more complex. 

The more common methods which have been followed 
have been to number streets from points of the compass, fromi 
a principal center, or from main highways within the com- 
munity. In Acton, however, where there is little uniformity 
in the relationship of streets, an acceptable method is subject 
to local conditions, and no single one of these methods would 
be satisfactory. 

It appears from our study that a combination of all these 
methods may have to be applied to our problem if streets are 
to be numbered in a manner which follows some logical 
pattern. The primary objectives of placing numbers on 
buildings are to facilitate merchandise deliveries, aid visitors, 
and simplify location records, and the method or pattern to be 
followed must be as consistent as possible with these 
objectives. 



—49— 

The plan which may be finally adopted will take into con- 
sideration the fact that the state highways passing through the 
town represent logical base lines from which to number most 
of the other streets. Great Road (Route 2), and Massachusetts 
Avenue (Route 111), as well as the proposed new state high- 
way, follow generally a direction from east to west and would 
therefore be numbered with numbers ascending from the 
Concord line. Main Street (Route 27), which runs from south 
to north, would be numbered starting from the Maynard line. 

It is expected that lateral roads which originate at these 
state highways will be numbered from these points of origin. 
In some instances there are streets which run between two of 
these main highways, and such streets would ordinarily be 
numbered from east to west, or from south to north in con- 
formity with the rule to be followed in numbering main state 
highways. Numbered in a similar manner would be roads 
which cross state highways as well as those streets which do 
not intersect at any location. Because of its special geograph- 
ical relationship to the entire town, Main Street will be used 
as the control line from which to number streets, when, tlie 
general rules do not appear to be applicable. 

Second to the problem of determining the directions in 
which numbers should run, has been that of deciding the 
proper distance between numbers. A distance of one hundred 
and ten (110) feet between numbers has been tentatively 
adopted, not only because it represents a reasonably common 
frontage for a lot, but especially because it constitutes a dis- 
tance which can be visually shown on the largest maps of the 
town which are available and practical for use. 

In the more congested areas, numbers will be assigned to 
each building or vacant lot where the distances are less than 
one hundred and ten feet, and in the sparsely settled areas, 
distances in excess of one hundred and ten feet may be desir- 
able. As communities grow and portions change in character, 
it frequently becomes necessary to entirely renumber all 
streets. This may constitute an, expensive procedure, and your 
committee has attempted to anticipate conditions in so far as 



—so- 
possible and make such a renumbering either remote or 
entirely unnecessary. 

The actual work of assigning specific numbers to specific 
locations is the next step which is to be undertaken in our 
work. It will necessarily be accomplished at moderate speed 
due to the fact that the work must be performed by the indi- 
vidual committee members in their available time. 

It is the desire of the committee to complete this work 
without expense to the town, and so far, all expenses, includmg 
the preparation of a large detail map of Acton, have been 
absorbed privately. Upon completion of the numbering, it is 
planned to have this map mounted and placed in a convenient 
location for public use. 

Inasmuch as this entire endeavor is for the convenience 
and benefit of the citizens, the committee will welcome at all 
times suggestions for improving the standard of its efl:orts. 

EDWARD J. BURSAW 
WEBSTER S. BLANCHARD 
CLARE A. MILBERY 
CLARA L. SAWYER 
HARLAN E. TUTTLE 
JOHN M. WHITTIER, Chairman 
January 28, 1942 



—51- 



High School Addition Building Committee 



To the Voters of Acton: 

As chairman of the High School Addition Building Com- 
mittee, I herewith submit the following report. 

At the first meeting of the committee on March 19, 1941, it 
was decided that the Special Committee and the School Com- 
mittee should organize and work as one committee, to be 
known as the High School Addition Building Committee. 

When detailed plans and specifications were completed 
by the architect, Charles H. Way of Boston, they were sub- 
mitted to eight carefully selected contractors for bids. The 
contract was awarded to Byron L. Moore of Framingham, who 
was the lowest bidder with a price of $16,768.00 for the com- 
plete construction of the addition. A bond was placed on Mr. 
Moore which guaranteed the completion of the addition 
according to the plans and specifications at the amount of 
the contract. 

In spite of the fact that it became increasingly difficult to 
obtain labor and materials with prices rapidly rising, good 
workmanship was maintained and the quality of materials was 
not cheapened throughout the entire period of construction. 
The addition was completed and equipped in time for the open- 
ing of school. 

Notwithstanding the prevalent unsettled industrial con- 
ditions, the committee is glad to report that they were able to 
carry through this construction as originally specified without 
asking the taxpayers for an additional appropiation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT C. HALL, 

Chairman. 



-52— 



Report of Cemetery Commissioners 
For the Year 1941 



We have endeavored another year to maintain the high 
standard of the past in the care of our cemeteries. The special 
appropriation of $300.00 made last year for trimming the 
large trees damaged by the hurricane has been completed and 
the amount expended as follows: 

Woodlawn Cemetery $150.00 

Mt. Hope Cemetery 147.63 $297.63 



$2.37 

In Mt. Hope Cemetery two new sections have been im- 
proved and laid out into lots, and several beds of shrubbery 
have been set out in different parts of the cemetery. Also sev- 
eral young maple and linden trees have been set out to replace 
those trees damaged or removed. 

In Woodlawn Cemetery two new sections have been 
graded and made suitable for lots. Also beds have been pre- 
pared for future planting in these sections. Several elm trees 
have been planted on each side of the main entrance to the 
Memorial Chapel. 

Owing to the smaller dividends received from invested 
funds the income from perpetual care funds has been sub- 
stantially reduced and in order to continue the care we have 
been giving we shall be obliged to depend more on our town 
appropriation. 

The account of the town treasurer shows that during the 
past year the cemetery department has received and paid 
into the treasury $1559.63, itemized as follows: — 

Sale of lots and graves $167.80 

Lowering device 57.00 

Annual care of lots 695.25 

Interments 416.00 

Foundation 224.38 $1,559.63 



—53— 

We ask that these receipts may be considered in making 
your appropriation for the current year. 

We recommend an appropriation for the care of ceme- 
teries of $2800.00. 

An itemized account of the expenditues for the care of the 
cemeteries will be found in the report of the Town 
Accountant. 

We have prepared a schedule of receipts and expenditures 
on account of each lot in perpetual care, in books kept for 
that purpose, which may be examined by persons interested. 

HARRY E. HOLT, 
WENDELL F. DAVIS, 
HORACE F, TUTTLE, 
Cemetery Commissioners. 



—54— 



Report of Superintendent of Moth 
Control Work 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1941. 

An appropriation of $1200 was made for this work last 
year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $335. The labor 
and running expense of the sprayer and truck was about $700. 
This included one spray throughout the town, a second spray 
in the badly infested sections, also a third spray for) the elm 
leaf beetle. 

The balance of the appropriation was used for creosoting 
gypsy moth egg clusters along the highways and for other 
necessary work as directed by the state. 

During 1941, the elm leaf beetle was very bad in many 
sections. 

An appropriation of $1200 is recommended for moth 
control and an appropriation of $300 for elm leaf beetle control 
for 1942. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent 



—55— 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1941. 

An appropriation of $1,000 was made for this work last 
year. This money was used for the feeding of 121 trees and 
for the replacement of 50 trees, also for emergency work such 
as removing broken and dangerous limbs from trees, bolting, 
cavity work and removing trees. 

Our trees need a great deal of care this year to save them. 
More trees should be planted. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $1500 be 
made for the trimming, bolting, cavity work, removing and 
the feeding and replacing of trees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden 



—56— 



Report of the Svipeiintendent of Streets 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit the annual report of the activities of the 
Highway Department for the year ending December 31, 1941. 

The condition of our roads is good and much work to 
improve our roads was accomplished this year. Continuing a 
project started on Nagog Hill Road several years ago a section 
starting at Raymond Durkee's and ending at Hammond Street 
was widened, large quantities of ledge removed by blasting, 
gravel placed over the whole distance and surface treated. In 
conjunction with our defense industries need for access roads. 
Concord Street was widened, graveled over that section that 
was not graveled last year and an initial surface treatment 
applied on the entire distance from Parker Street to the Amer- 
ican Cyanimid & Chemical Corporation's siding. Hayward Road 
was greatly improved by widening, grading, installing two 
new culverts and surface treating the entire distance that was 
formerly in gravel. Charter Road was widened by grading and 
removal of much ledge and boulders from the right of way. 
Gravel was placed on about a thousand feet and it was surfaced 
from the High School to the intersection of Hayward Road. 
Conant Street was graded and initial surface treatment applied 
to finish the entire street and bring it into very good condition. 
Nashoba Road which was unfinished last year was graded, 
rolled and surfaced from Central Street to the Jenks' Farm. 
Carlisle Road had three-tenths of a mile graded, rolled and 
newly surface treated. 

The above work was done under Chapter 81 and many 
miles of other roads in town were scraped, graded, surface 
treated and had brush cut on them. 



—57— 

The following streets were treated with peastone on 
asphalt; Arlington Street, Concord Street, Central Street, 
Newton Road, School Street (South) , Summer Street and 
Willow Street. 

On Chapter 90 Construction 1600 feet of macadam road 
was built in North Acton on Main Street. 

The bridge over the Marlboro Branch of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad was rebuilt by the railroad and replanked by 
the town. In an attempt to lengthen the life of the planking 
an inch and a half of bituminous concrete was applied and looks 
as though it might do the trick. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



-58— 



Report of Town Forest Committee 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Acton Town Forest Committee herewith submits the 
following report for the year 1941: 

With no funds at our disposal, we have been unable to 
make improvement thinnings in our present forest or to 
purchase additional land. 

We have applied to the State Division of Forestry for 
advice and a management plan, which they will prepare for 
us free of charge. 

Five additional communities in Massachusetts started 
Town Forests this season and many others materially in- 
creased their acreage so that the total acreage in Town Forests 
is now 37,430. 

We earnestly urge interested citizens to donate cut over 
land or parcels of woodland to the Town so that we may 
increase our area. They can be made profitable to the town, 
serve as recreational centers, and bird sanctuaries. A gift of a 
sizable tract could be handled as a Memorial. 

ALBERT R. JENKS 
CLARENCE FROST 
JAMES J. KNIGHT 



59— 



Assessors' Report — 1941 

Tax assessed as follows: 

Buildings, exclusive of land $2,526,850.00 

Land 631,280.00 

Personal 402,850.00 

$3,560,980.00 

Valuation January 1, 1940 3,529,540.00 

Increase in valuation 31,440.00 

Rate of Taxation, $28.40 

Real Estate $89,690.90 

Personal Estate 11,441.00 

Polls 1,846.00 

$102,977.90 

Amount of money raised: 

State Tax $10,230.00 

County Tax 5,854.53 

State Parks Tax 149.89 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 944.26 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 684.82 
Repair and Reconstruction of 

Bridges 306.42 

Town Grant 81,137.95 

Overlay 3,670.03 

$102,977.90 

Added Assessments: 

Polls 44.00 

Excise: 

Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1,403 

Total Value of Motor Vehicles $325,580.00 

Rate of Taxation, $36.80 

Total Excise Tax $10,104.28 

ALBERT P. DURKEE 
HENRY L. HAYNES 
CARL FLINT 

Board of Assessors 



—60- 



Report of Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 



Investments 

Warren Institution for Savings $1,465.54 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

$3,465.54 

Receipts 

Warren Institution for Savings 29.46 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank . . 20.00 

City Institution for Savings 20.00 

$69.46 

Payments • 

Harlan E. Tuttle, treasurer of the Evan- 
gelical Church in Acton $49.46 

Town of Acton, care of lot in Woodlawn 
Cemetery 20.00 

$69.46 

CHARLOTTE CONANT 
CHARLES E. SMITH 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 



-61- 



Report of the Work of the Middlesex 

County Extension Service in Acton 

for the Year 1941 



The following is a report of some of the activities of the 
Middlesex County Extension Service in the town of Acton 
during the year 1941: 

Acton continued to serve as the county center for poultry 
activities, with the County Poultry Association holding most 
of its meetings within the town. Porter G. Jenks, David F. 
Penney and Charles H. Liebfried have their dairy herds in the 
Herd Improvement Association. Porter Jenks is Vice-President 
of the Middlesex County Herd Health Association, an organi- 
zation that is creating considerable interest in the state. Many 
farm visits were made to apple and vegetable growers, princi- 
pally on the problems of insect and disease control. A twilight 
meeting was held at the orchard of Albert Jenks, with fifty in 
attendance. 

Judges were furnished for the Acton Fair and speakers 
were furnished to various local organizations. 

The Acton homemakers have participated in many of the 
county projects, including food preservation, food preparation, 
better lighting, chair reseating, making of slip covers and 
Christmas gifts. 

During the year there have been nine clubs among the boys 
and girls, with a total enrollment of 138. Projects included 
were home furnishing, clothing, garden, craft, poultry and ag- 
riculture. The work was carried on under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. Warren Hartwell. Other members of the committee were 
Porter Jenks, Richard Greenman and Mrs. E. H. Hollowell. All 
of the town clubs participated in a large town Rally in Febru- 
ary, held at the high school, with the drivers of the school 
busses kindly furnishing transportation. 

Acton took a fine interest in the financing of Camp Middle- 



—62— 

sex and through various ways contributed $95.60 toward the 
camp. Twenty boys and girls from the town attended this camp 
during the summer. 

The Acton Garden Club awarded cash prizes to boys and 
girls with outstanding 4-H gardens, the following winning 
prizes: Dorothy Pendergast, Albert Durkee, Gerald Gowen, 
Kathleen Sweeney, Robert Frost, Orson Miller, William Tuttle, 
Kirk Quinn, Alfred Tracy, Louise Hurley, Mildred Hollowell 
and Joseph Sweeney. 



Report of Sealer of Weights and Measures 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report as Sealer of Weights and 
Measures, for the year ending December 31, 1941. During the 
year 367 weighing and measuring devices were sealed, 16 not 
sealed, and 2 condemned. 

The State Department of Standards again loaned a 100 gal- 
lon test tank for checking oil tank truck meter systems. 
Through the courtesy and generosity of Mr. William J. Gal- 
lagher of the East Acton Garage, this equipment was moved 
about for the convenience of your Sealer. 

With the aid of State owned equipment, an accurate check 
was made on truck platform scales; all scales of this type are 
in excellent condition. 

The usual fine cooperation of owners of weighing and meas- 
uring devices is appreciated. 

Paid Town Treasurer $80.06 

Sealing Fees Paid Town Treasurer 76.57 

Overpaid $3.49 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARE A. MILBERY, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



—63— 



Report of Police Department 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the report of the Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1941. 

Complete List of Arrests Made: 

Drunkenness 10 

Operating under influence of liquor 8 

Manslaughter 1 

Breaking and Entering 2 

Larceny 3 

Using a motor vehicle without authority 

Non-Support 

Soliciting alms in army uniform 

Selling without a license 

Soliciting alms on a highway 

Going away after causing injury to property 

Operating so as to endanger 3 

Speeding 18 

Law of the road 9 

Operating without a license 12 

Failure to slow at intersection 3 

Operating after revocation of license 2 

No license in possession 

No registration in possession 

Allowing an improper person to operate 

Failing to stop at "Stop" sign 

Operating an unregistered motor vehicle 

Operating an uninsured motor vehicle 

Operating without an inspection sticker 

Impeded operation of a motor vehicle 

Improper brakes 

Unlawful sale of liquor 

Keeping and Exposing liquor for sale 

Gaming 

Returned to the town in fines $425.60 



-64-- 

Raids: 

One warrant was issued for search of alcoholic beverages 
and gaming implements. Liquor and one slot machine was 
seized and forfeited. 

Accidents: 

Total number of accidents reported 38 

Number of motorists injured 37 

Number of pedestrians injured 3 

Number of fatal accidents 1 

Total number killed or injured 41 

I am pleased to report that there were 29 less accidents and 
26 less persons injured this year than in 1940 although the 
opening of Fort Devens caused a large increase in the number 
of cars passing through our town. 

Civilian Defense: 

Your Police Department has cooperated with the Comm.it- 
tee on Public Safety and at the request of Chairman W. Burton 
Harvey organized an Auxiliary Police force of twenty men. 
These men have been appointed special police officers with 
power to arrest and will be furnished badges and other neces- 
sary equipment but will not be uniformed at the present time. 
These men will be called upon to help handle traffic during test 
raids and during any emergency, all motorists are asked to 
cooperate with us and obey their orders promptly. Any oper- 
ator who fails to obey any reasonable demand of these officers 
will be reported to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles with the 
request that the license of this operator be suspended indefi- 
nitely. We must have the cooperation of the public in order to 
keep our roads open for fire apparatus, ambulances and other 
emergency vehicles. 

Cruiser — Two-Way Radio: 

We have been notified by the Mass. Dept. of Public Safety 
that the State Police radio system is to be improved and that 
specifications for ultra-high frequency modulated (F. M.) radio 



—65— 

equipment have been released to bidders. This means that 
radios now used to pick up calls from W. M. P. State Police Sta- 
tion at Framingham will be of no further use. We have been 
receiving calls through W. M. P. for a number of years and 
consider it an invaluable means cf calling an officer who is 
patrolling through the different sections of the town. These 
radios that we have used in the past were our own private 
radios changed over at our own expense to give you this needed 
service. Now, however, with the change to be made in the 
State Police system, this cannot be done and it is up to the 
people of the town to decide if they want to continue to equip 
the police so that they can give them efficient service in the 
protection of life and property. * 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



Report of Workmen's Compensation Agent 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: 

.During the past year there have been seven accidents to 
the employees of the town, none of which proved serious. It is 
very important that your compensation agent be notified 
promptly in case of accident as it is necessary to make out a 
rather lengthy report in order that the employee may receive 
the benefits from the insurance company. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 



—66- 



Librarian's Report, 1941 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 
1941, 21,534. Increase l^y Purchase, 387. Increase by gift, 58. 
Total increase, 445. Withdrawn from circulation, 196. Total 
number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1942, 21,783. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was open, 102. 
Number of volumes circulated, 13,247. 
Largest daily circulation, 264 on February 26. 
Smallest daily circulation, 51 on June 11. 
Daily average circulation, 129+ . 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and paid 
to Town Treasurer, $27.79. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Gov., 5; State of Mass., 6; B. M. Baruch, 1; Dee 
Beebe, 1; Mrs. Chester C. Bolton, 1; Hans V. Briesen, 1; Lady 
Campbell, 1; Avis Collins, 1; Edwin Fobes, 5; Foster Hope Co., 
1; DeWolfe & Fiske Co., 1; Mrs. Burton Harvey, 8; Alfred V. 
Jules, 20; C. A. Sahlberg, 1; Alfred P. Sloan, 1; Eleanor Stevens, 
1; Henry H. Taft, 1; L. S. Tapman, 1; Ernest H. Washburn, 1. 
Total, 58. 

This year we have received the gift of a marble statue of 
Ophelia with pedestal, from Mr. Edgar Hall, a former resident 
of West Acton. The Librarian has given a drawing of Acton 
church in 1874, and one of the Hayward mansion as it was 
before its burning in 1912. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, Librarian 



—67— 

NON-FICTION 

Amsbafy, W. B.— M'sieu Robin Lyrics and Legends — 81A528m 

Arnold, T. W.— Bottlenecks of Business 33A759b 

Baldwin, E. J. — Principles of Inorganic and Analy- 
tical Chemistry 54B181p 

Bartram, W.— The Travels of William Bartram .... 917.3B294t 
Baruch, B. M.— American Industry in the War ... 940.3B295a 

Becednell, C. M.— A Picture Book of Evolution 50B365p 

Benchley, B. J.— My Life in a Man-made Jungle . 59B457m 
Bergey, D. H.— Handbook of Practical Hygiene 64B495h 

Bingham, H.— Elihu Yale 924Y17b 

Binns, C. F.— The Potters Craft 66B614p 

Blanton & Peale— Faith is the Answer 26B643f 

Bottome, P.— Mansion House of Liberty 940.4B751m 

Bridges, W.— Big Zoo 59B851b 

Briesen, H. V.— Why Not Know Florida 917.3B853w 

Brooks, C. S.— A Thread of English Roads 914.2B783t 

Buchan, J.— Pilgrims Way 924B918b 

Buermeyer, L. and Others — Introduction to Reflec- 
tive Thinking 15B928i 

Burnett, C. B.— The Shoemakers Son 928A546b 

Buxton, H.— Assignment Down East 917.3B991a 

Cahil, H. (Ed.)— American Art To-day 75C132a 

Calverton, V. F. (Ed.) — An Anthology of American 

Negro Literature 81C167a 

Carter and Cole — Laboratory Course in General 

Chemistry 54C3231 

Carter, R. G.— The 101st Field Artillery, A.E.F. 

1917-1919 940.3C324O 

Carver, T. N.— Principles of Political Economy 33C331p 

Cash, W. J.— The Mind of the South 81C338m 

Chamberlain, S.— Gloucester and Cape Ann 917.3C4431g 

Chamberlain, S.— Longfellows Wayside Inn 917.3C44311o 

Churchill, W. S.— Blood Sweat and Tears 940.4C563b 

Clemens, S. C— Mark Twain in Eruption 81C625m 

Connolly, J. B.— The Port of Gloucester 974.5C743p 

Cummings, L. V.— I Was a Head-hunter 918C971i 



—68— 

Dixon, R. B.— The Racial History of Man 57D621r 

Duggan, T. W. (Ed.)— Round the World with Cotton 63D8662a 

Eddy, C— Voyaging Down the Thames 914.2E21v 

Edgett, E. F.— I Speak for Myself 922E231e 

Finney & Brown — Modern Business Arithmetic 65F514m 

Floherty, J. J.— Aviation from Shop to Sky 62F628a 

Floherty, J. J.— Men Without Fear 62F628me 

Floherty, J. J.— Police! 35F628p 

Floherty, J. J.— Your Daily Paper 07F628y 

Floherty, J. J.— Youth at the Wheel 62F628Y 

Frith, J. B.— Chemistry in the Home 64F919c 

Frost, J.— Harvard and Chambridge a Sketch Book 74F939h 

Geijerstam, G. A.— Northern Winter 89G312n 

George, H. — Progress and Poverty 33G348p 

Giddings & Newton — Junior Song and Chorus Book . 78G453ju 

GHck, C— Shake Hands with the Dragon 917.3G559s 

Godbole, N. W.— Milk the Most Perfect Food 64G577m 

Gowin, E. B.— Developing Executive Ability 37G722d 

Grant, C. P.— The Syrian Desert 953G761s 

Gridley, M. S. (Ed.)— Indians of To-day 921G847i 

Griffin, M.— Fall Guys 79G852f 

Gwynn, S.— Claude Monet and His Garden 925M742g 

Hall, R. M. and A. N.— Home Handicraft for Girls . 68H178h 

Hall, S. R.— The Advertising Handbook 65H179a 

Hammond, J. W.— Men and Volts 62H226m 

Hicks, J. E. — What the Citizen Should Know About 

Our Arms and Weapons 62H631w 

Hitler, A.— Mein Kampf 926H674h 

Hoover, H.— A Boyhood in Iowa 922H789h 

Hough, H. B.— Country Editor 81H838c 

Hough, E. — The Web — History of the American Pro- 
tective League 35H838w 

Humphreys, W. J. — Rain Making and Other Weather 

Vagaries 55H927r 

Hyde, G. M.— Handbook for Newspaper Workers ... 07H993h 
Johnson E. (Ed.) — Opera Cavalcade, the Story of the 

Metropolitan 78J68o 



—69— 

Jones, A. W.— Life, Liberty and Property 33J7611 

Keith, A. N.— Land Below the Wind 919.3K281 

Keith, H.— Sports and Games 79K28s 

Kent, R.— Salamina 919.8K37s 

King, B.— The Conquest of Fear 15K52c 

Klein, J. J. — Bookkeeping and Accounting 65K64b 

Lambert, S. M.— A Yankee Doctor in Paradise 922L2221 

Lester, R. M.— Forty Years of Carnegie Giving 37L642f 

Lippman, W.— Preface to Morals 23L766f 

Lyon, M.— Take to the Hills 63L991t 

Lyon, L. S.— Making a Living 37L991m 

McCann, E. A.— Ship Model Making 69M114s 

McKearin, G. S. and H.— American Glass 74M154a 

Martyn, W.— The Wandering Years 910M388w 

Marx K.— Capital and Other Writing 33M392c 

Maurois, A. — Tragedy in France 940.4M47b 

Miller, D— You Can't do Business With Hitler ... 940.4M647y 

Nason, L. H.— Approach to Battle 35N263a 

Nicol, H.— Plant Growth Substances 63N634p 

Noppen, J. G.— Royal Westminster 914.2N821w 

Nutchuk (with A. Hatch)— Son of the Smoky Sea 922N976n 
O'Hare, E.— How to Make Your Own Furniture 68036h 

Olyanova, M. — What Does Your Handwriting Reveal 65053v/ 

Oswald, J. C. — Printing in the Americas 65086p 

Parsons, H. C— A Puritan Outpost 974.5P268p 

Pennell, J. P.— Adventures of an Illustrator 922P413pe 

Pitkin, W. B.— Careers After Forty 65P684c 

Pittaro and Green — Beginner's Spanish 46P688b 

Pleasants, H. Jr.— Thomas Mason Adventurer 922M4121p 

Praviel, A. — Biarritz Pau and the Basque Country 914.4P918b 

Reck, F. and C— Power from Start to Finish 62R298p 

Ripley, R. L.— Ripley's Big Book Believe it or Not 03R592r 

Roberts, L P.— The Horse 63R644h 

Sahlberg, C. A.— The New System 33S131n 

Sapieha, V.— Polish Profile 928S241p 

Seger, G.— A Nation Terriorized 940.4S454n 

Shaw, C. W.— Text-Book of Nursing 61S534t 



—70— 

Shepherd, G.— The Silver Magnet 917.2S548s 

Shirer, W. L.— Berlin Diary 940.4S558b 

Siebert, W. H. — The Underground Railroad in Mass- 
achusetts 974.5S571U 

Siebert, W. H. — Vermont's Anti-slavery and Under- 
ground Railroad Record 974.3S571v 

Sloan, A. P., Jr.— Adventui^es of a White Collarman . . 922S634s 

Smith, C. P.— Annals of the Poets 17S644a 

Speakman, H.— Mostly Mississippi 917.3S7411m 

Spears, W. H. — America's Fascinating Highways 917.3S7412a 

Spence, H.— One Foot in Heaven 922S744s 

Stalin, J.— Joseph Stalin's Credo 928S782st 

Steenstrup, C. H. R.— The Medieval Popular Ballad 89S813m 

Stewart, G. and E.— I Have a Book 74S849i 

Stille, S. H.— Ohio Builds a Nation 977.1S857o 

Stuhldreher, H. A.— Knute Rockne All American 79S933k 

Taft, H. W.— Opinions, Literary and Otherwise 81T124o 

Tate, A. O.— Edison's Open Door 922E23t 

Tchekor, A.— Plays .^ 89T251p 

Tegarden, J. H.— Why Do We Do As We Do 15T261w 

Thomas, L. (Ed.)— Pageant of Adventure 910T458p 

Thompson and Raymond — Gang Rule in New York 36T469g 
Thompson, M. J. — Captain Nathaniel Lord Thomp- 
son and the Ships he Built 973.4T474c 

Todd, H.— A Man Named Grant 922G763t 

Tunney, G.— Arms for Living 922T926t 

Upshur, G. L.— As I Recall Them 922U69u 

Valtin, J.— Out of the Night 926V215v 

Veblen, T.— The Theory of the Leisure Class 30V394t 

Vulte, H. T.— Food Industries 64.V991f 

Weygandt, C. — November Rowen 81W547n 

Williamson, S. G.— The American Craftsman 68W687a 

Wilson, C. W.— Country Living Plus and Minus 63W747c 

Wilson, F. — Crusader in Crinoline, Life of Harriet 

Beecher Stowe 922S891w 

Wood and Goddard — Games for Two 79W874g 

Yoder, J. W. — Rosanna of the Amish 922Y54y 

Zinsser, H. — As I Remember Him 926Z77z 



—71— 

FICTION 

Abbe, G.— Dreamers Clay A124d 

Abdullah, A.— Never Without You A136ne 

Adams, T.— Boss of the Big C A218b 

Alexander, G. D.— The Evil Empress A375e 

Allan, D. — Brandon is Missing A417b 

Allis, M.— Not Without Peril A438n 

Ames, J.— The Pretty One A513p 

Arlen, M.— The Flying Dutchman A723i 

Ashton, E. B. — Strangers in the Land A828s 

Atherton, G— The House of Lee : A868b 

Babson, N. L. — All the Tomorrows BllSa 

Bagnold, E.— "National Velvet" B147n 

Beale, W.— Frontier of the Deep B3661f 

Beals, H. A.— The River Rises B366r 

Borden, M.— Paspourt for a Girl B728p 

Bottome, P.— Danger Signal B751da 

Boucher, A.— The Case of the Solid Key B753c 

Brener, M.— Love Knows No Holiday B837] 

Bridge, A.— Four-part Setting B851i 

Bristow, G.— This Side of Glory B861t 

Bromfield, L.— Early Autumn B868e 

Brush, K.— Young Man of Manhatten B912y 

Buchan, J. — Mountain Meadow B918mo 

Butler, S.— The Way of all Flesh B987w 

Canfield, D.— Seasoned Timber C222se 

Carvice, C— Heart for Heart C331h 

Gather, W.— Sapphira and the Slave Girl C3635sa 

Chrisholm, A. M.— Yellow Horse C542y 

Christie, A.— The Patriotic Murders C5551pa 

Clancy, E. A.— Watched Out C587w 

Cole, J.— Lone Star Silver C6891 

Colin, G. C— Battling Buckaroos C696b 

Colver, A. R.— There is Only One C727th 

Comstock, H. T.— Sacrifice For Love C739sa 

Coyle, K.— Who Dwell with Wonder C881w 

Cronin, A. J.— The Keys to the Kingdom C9471k 



—72— 

Culley, C— Range Justice C9671r 

Curry, T.— The Buffalo Hunters C976b 

Davis, C. B.— Nebraska Coast D261n 

Deeping, W.— Blue-water D311bl 

Deeping, W. — Polly Island DSllpo 

Dela Roche, M.— White Oak Heritage D339wi 

Danver, D. C— The Feud at Sleepy Cat D416f 

Douglas, L. C. — Invitation to Live D734i 

Eaton, E. — Quietly my Captain Waits E141q 

Eberhart, M. G.— The Patient in Room 18 E161p 

Eiker, M.— Brief Seduction of Eva E34b 

Fair, P.— April's Daughter F163a 

Fair, P.— Fates Stepchild F163fa 

Fair, P.— Flaming Beauty F163f 

Fair, P.— Sondra F163s 

Fedorova, N.— The Family F294f 

Field, P.— Outlaws Three F4552( 

Fielding, H.— Hidden Out F4592h 

Flint, M.— Back o' the Mountain F624b 

Footner, H.— More Than Bread F687m 

Footner, H.— Sinfully Rich F687s 

Frankau, G.— Farewell Romance F8281f 

Frankau, G.— The Dangerous Years F8281d 

Frisbie, R. D.— Mr. Moonhght's Island F917m 

Gardner, E. S.— The Case of the Lucky Legs G2261c 

Gardner, E. S.— The Case of the Velvet Claws G2261ca 

Gibbons, S.— Nightingale Wood G4412n 

Gill, T.— The Gay Bandit of the Border G475ga 

Goldsmith, M.— Christine of Sweden G6241c 

Grey, V. — Impulsive Youth G845i 

Grey, V.— Moon Magic G845m 

Grimstead, J. E. — Round-up at Tiger Gap G865r 

Hammett, D.— The Thin-man H224t 

Hardy, T.— Jude the Obscure H272J 

Harrison, C. W.— Boothill Trail H3181b 

Henry, H.— When is a Lady H522w 

Hilton, J.— Lost Horizon H6561 



—73— 

Hine, M.— Family Circle H6621f 

Hogarth, E.— The Goose is Cooked H715g 

Holt T.— Pinto Blood H7584p 

Holton, E. A. — Anchors to Winward H758a 

Hurlburt, E. H. — Lanagan Amateur Detective H9651 

Hurst, F.— Back Street H9595b 

Hutchens, J. — John Brown's Cousin H9741j 

Hutchingson, R. C— Testament H977t 

James, W. — Horses I Have Known J29h 

Jameson, S. — Here Comes a Candle J31h 

Johnson, O.— Blue Blood J68b 

Kinkead, C. — Common Clay K511c 

Kinsburn, E. — Squatters at Dab Chick Lake K56s 

Knight. E.— This Above All K693t 

Krey, L.— On the Long Tide K92o 

Lancaster, B. — For Us the Living L2442f 

Langham, J. R. — Sing a Song of Homicide L279s 

Larrimore, L. — Uncle Caleb's Niece L334u 

Larsson, G. — Our Daily Bread L3341o 

Lewis, S.— Bethel Merriday L676be 

Lincoln, J. C. and F.— The New Hope L7372n 

Lion, H.— Mill Stream L763m 

Livingston, A. — On the Right Wrists L786o 

McCarter, M. H.— Homeland M1235h 

McCulley, J.— The Mark of Zorro M1332m 

McCulley, J.— Rollicking Rogue M1332r 

Macfarlane, P. C— Tongues of Flame M1431t 

Manning, D.— King Charlie's Riders M283k 

Manning, D.— Western Tommy M283w 

Marks, P.— The Days are Fled M3451d 

Marsh, R.— The Great Temptation M3652g 

Maugham, W. S.— Cakes and Ale M449ca 

Meredith, G.— Diana of the Crossways M559d 

Merrill, L. C— The Lonesome Kid M5711 

Montgomery, L. M.— Anne of the Windy Poplars M787aq 

Morris, H.— The Vantage Point M8761v 

Morton, A.— Challenge Blue Mask M8891c 



—74— 

Oppenheim, E. P. — Curious Happenings to the Rooke 

Legatees 062cu 

Oppenheim, E. P. — General Basserley's Second Puz- 
zle Box 062ge 
Oppenheim, E. F.— The Stranger's Gate 0625v 
Parmenter, C. W.— As the Seed is Sown P254a 
Parmenter, C. W. — Stories of Courage and Devotion P254st 
Parrish, A. — Mr. Despondency's Daughter P2615mr 
Passos, J. D. — Adventures of a Young Man P289a 
Paul, E.— The Stars and Stripes Forever P324s 

Payne, E. S.— Steadfast Light P3461st 

Perkins, G.— Modern Lady P448m 

Perry, C— The Two Reds of Travoy P462t 

Philpotts, E.— Monkshood P556mo 

Philpotts, E.— Tabletop P556ta 

Pilgrim, D.— So Great a Man P637s 

Pitzer, R. C— Badmen of Elk Head P692b 

Pollock, F. L.— Honey of Danger P776h 

Poynter, B.— The Squatter Girl P892s 

Preston, A.— The Limping Sheriff P9371 

Proust, M.— Swann's Way P96815 

Reback, J. M.— The Eagles Gather R239- 

Remarque, E. M.— Floatsam R384i 

Rhode, J.— Death Pays a Dividend R475d 

Roche, A. S.— A Rhapsody in Gold R673r 

Root, C— An American Sir R782a 

Savage, J. —Bandit Love S264b 

Savage, J.— The Spaniard S264s 

Severy, M. L.— The Awakening S498a 

Shappiro, H.— The Black Rider S529b 

Shedd, G. C— Rustlers of the Basin '. S541r 

Shute, N.— Landfall a Channel Story S56211 

Sims, M.— Morning Star S614m 

Skidmore, H. — Heaven Came so Near S628h 

Smith, G. P.— Invincible Surmise S648i 

Smith, H. L.— The Uncertain Glory S6492u 

Smollett, T.— Humphrey Clinker S666h 



—75— 

Speare, D.— The Road to Needles S7411r 

Stevenson, D. E.— Mrs. Tim of the Regiment S8471m 

Stickney, F. L.— The Rubber Mask S854r 

Stong, P.— Ivanhoe Keeler S877i 

Stong, P.— The Rebellion of Lennie Barlow 8877r 

Stout, R.— Over My Dead Body S889o 

Streatfield, N.— Caroline England S9141c 

Struther, J.— Mrs. Miniver S927m 

Tapman, L. S.— The Success of Failure ... T172s 

Tarkington, B.— The Heritage of Hatcher Ide T176h 

Thorne, D.— The Golden Temptation TSlllg 

Tilden, F.— The Spanish Prisoner T571s 

Tucker, A.— Miss Susie Slagles T891m 

Turnbull, M.— In the Bride's Mirror T943i 

Vance, L. J.— Nobody V2222n 

VanDoren, M.— Windless Cabins V246w 

Wadsley, O.— Spring Dust W124sp 

Walpole, H.— Portrait of a Man With Red Hair W218p 

Walpole, H.— The Sea Tower W218se 

Walsh, M.— The Dark Rose W226d 

Walsh, M.— The Hill is Mine W226h 

Walsh, M.— Sons of the Sword Maker W226s 

Wells, C— Calling all Suspects W453c 

Wells, C— Crime Tears On W453cs 

Westlands, L.— King Cayuse W529k 

Westlands, L.— The Nightmare Riders W529n 

Whipple, M.— The Giant Joshua W574g 

Williams, C— Emergency Nurse W7221e 

Williams, J. L.— They Still Fall in Love W724t 

Wodehouse, P. G.— Quick Service W838q 

Wood, P.— Star-wagon W878s 

Worts, G. F.— The Blue Lacquer Box W932b 

JUVENILE 

Anon — Book of Indians JAlOObo 

Anon — Book of Trains JAlOObp 

Anon — Farmyard Singers JAlOOi" 

Anon — Farmyard Friends JAlOOfa 



—76— 

Anon— My Book of Cats and Dogs JAlOOm 

Allee, M. H.— Ann's Surprising Summer JA422a 

Allee, M. H.— A House of Her Own JA422h 

Ames, M. M.— Canthook Country JA5141c 

Angelo, v.— Paradise Valley JA584p 

Ayer, J.— Donald Duck and His Friends A976d 

Beston, H.— The Firelight Fairy Book JB5611f 

Beston, H.— The Starlight Wonder Book JB561s 

Birney, H.— Steeldust the Story of a Horse JB619s 

Bowman, J. C— Winabojo Master of Life JB7841w 

Brier, H. M.— Smoke Eater JB853sm 

Brill, E. C— White Brother JB857w 

Brink, C. R.— Caddie Woodlawn JB858c 

Brown, R.— Two Children of Brazil JB879t 

Brumbaugh, F.— Donald Duck and His Nephews JB893d 

Buch, M. W.— Animals Through the Year JB9181a 

Cannan, J. — A Pony for Jean JC224p 

Carter, R. G.— Brothers of the Frontier JC3245br 

Carter, R. G.— City of Adventure JC3245c 

Chalmers, A.— Fancy Be Good JC4381f 

Claire, M.— Old Faithful JC585o 

Clark, A. N.— In My Mother's House JC5921i 

Coatsworth, E.— Away Goes Sally JC652a 

Coatsworth, E.— The Boy With the Parrot JC652b 

Davis, L. R.— Pony Jungles JD262p 

DeAngeli, M.— Elin's Amerika JD283e 

DeAngeli, M.— Thee Hannah JD283t 

Dixon, F. W.— The Disappearing Floor JD621di 

Dixon, F. W.— The Mystery of the Flying Express JD621mz 
Dixon, F. W.— The Secret Warning JD621sq 

Dixon, F. W.— The Twisted Claw JD621tw 

Dixon, F. W.— What Happened at Midnight JD621wh 

DuBois, W. P.— Giant Otto JD816g 

DuBois, W. P.— Otto at Sea JD8I60 

Duncombe, F.— High Hurdles JD913h 

Fisher and Langham — On the Farm JF5331on 

Fisher and Langham — Our Pets JF5331w 

Fitzgerald, P. L.— Drovers East JF554d 



—77— 

Flynn and Lund— Tick-tock a Story of Time JF648t 

Garner, E. — Waydown in Tennessee JG234w 

Gill and Hoke— Paco Goes to the Fair JG475p 

Glenn, M. and Others— Blending Voices JG558b 

Glenn, M. and Others— Songs of Many Lands JG558s 

Goetz, D. — Letters from Guatemala JG5991 

Harper, W. — Brownie of the Circus , JH2951b 

Heal, E.— Mr. Pink and the House on the Roof JH433m 

Heyliger, W.— Backfield Comet JH617ba 

Heyliger, W. — Captain Fair and Square JH617c 

Hinkle, T. C— Barry, the Story of a Wolf Dog JH663ba 

Hinkle, T. C— Hurricane Pinto JH663h 

Hoke, H.— Major and the Kitten JH721m 

Holling, H. C— Paddle to-the-Sea JH741p 

Hull, J.— The Stage Struck Seal JH913s 

Hunt, M. L.— John of Pudding Lane JH942J 

Huntington, H. E.— Let's go to the Sea Shore JH9511e 

Kahman, C. — Gypsy Goes to College JK12g 

Keelor, K. L.— On Charlie Clarke's Farm JK261o 

Keene, C— The Mystery of the Locked Room JK26mf 

Keene, C. — The Mystery at the Moss Covered Mansion JK26mx 
Keene, C— The Mystery of the Brass Bound Trunk JK26mw 

Keene, C. — Mysterious Fireplace JK26mz 

Keene, C— The Sign of the Twisted Candles JK26si 

Keene, C— The Secret at the Gatehouse TK26st 

Key, A.— With Daniel Boone on the Caroliny Trail JK44w 

Lansing, M. F.— Nicholas Arnold, Toolmaker JL294n 

Lee, M. H.— Lah-luck and Tuck-she of the Brush JL4791 

Leighton, M.— The Secret of the Old House JL5291s 

McCloskey, R.— Make Way for Ducklings JM127m 

McCullock, R.— Polly Kent Rides West JM133p 

McDonough, M. M.— Sun in the West JM137s 

McDonough, M. M.— Tenderfoot Gold JM137t 

Malkus, A. S.— The Citadel of a Hundred Stairways JM251c 
Mallette, G. E.— Into the Wind JM253i 

Mathews, F. K.— Boy Scout Book of Good Turn 

Stories JM431bq 

Mathews, F. K. — Boy Scout Year Book of Patriotic 

Stories JM431br 



—78— 

Merwin, D.— Parachute Pup JM576p 

Myers, S. A.— Pets and Friends JM996p 

Nolan, J. C— The Story of Clara Barton of the Red 

Cross JN788S 

North, S.--Greased Lightning JN867g 

Orton, H. F.— Mystery at the Little Schoolhouse J077m 

Osswald and Reed — Hundreds of Turkeys J0841h 

Osswald and Reed — My Dog Laddie and Frisky the 

Goat J0841m 

Palmer, R.— Mickey Never Fails JP175m 

Pollock, K. G.— The Gaucho's Daughter JP7761g 

Renick, J. and M.— David Cheers the Team JR413d 

Robinson, T.— Pete JR665p 

Rounds, G.— The Blind Colt JR859b 

Sanders, R. M.— Mystery at Penmarth JS215m 

Saxon, C. — The Mystery at Camp Lenape JS273m 

Seaman, A. H.— Bitsy Finds the Clue JS438bi 

Seaman, A. H.— The Figure Head of the Folly JS438f 

Seaman, A. H.— The Mystery of the Empty Room .... JS438my 

Seaman, A. H.— The Riddle at Live Oaks JS438r 

Snedeker, C. D.— The White Isle JS6712w 

Sperry, A. (Ed.)— Story Parade Gold Book JS751s 

Stuart, F. P.— Piang, the Moro Chieftain JS929p 

Tarshis, E. K.— The Village that Learned to Read . . JT193v 

Turner and Hallock — Growing Up JT9451g 

Turner, C. E. and Others— Keeping Safe and Well JT9451k 

Updegraff, F. M.— Coat For a Soldier JU63c 

Urmston, M.— Forty Faces JU77f 

VanStockum, H.— Pegeen JV281p 

Waldeck, T. J.— The White Panther JW1581w 

Weik, M. H.— The House on Cherry Hill JW4212h 

White, A. T.— Lost Worlds J9W5811 

Williams, H. L.— Kimbi Indian of the Jungle JW684k 

Williams, U. M.— Peter and the Wanderlust JW727p 

Wirt, M. A.— Sky Racers JW799s 

Worth, K.— The Middle Button JW^932m 

Worthington, M. — Sally and her Homemaking JW934s 

Yeager, D.— Bob Flame, Rocky Mountain Ranger . JY37bo 
Yeager, D — Scarface JY37s 



—79— 



Report of Inspector of Animals 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for the 
year 1941. 

Cows 283 

Young Cattle 87 

Bulls 15 

Oxen 2 

Goats 18 

Sheep 14 

Swine 773 

Dogs Quarantined 17 

Rabies 1 

Barns Inspected 55 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



Report of Inspector of Slaughtering 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Slaughtering for 
the year 1941. 

Beef 2 

Veal 6 

Condemned none. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 



-80- 



Elizabeth White Fund 

The Trustees have signed orders for the sum of three hun- 
dred seventy-five dollars $375.00. 

We have given this, where in our judgment, it was most 
needed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CLARA SAWYER, 

Trustees. 



Report of Dog Officer 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I submit herewith my report, as Dog Officer, covering work 
done for the year 1941: 
Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law 48 

Number of dogs sold 2 

Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance 
with law 

Total number of dogs handled 50 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 25 

Warnings to delinquent dog owners to get licences 125 

Appropriation $200.00 

50 dogs @ $3.00 for six days' board 150.00 

48 dogs @ $1.00 for disposal 48.00 

Total for board and disposal $198.00 

For sale of dogs 6.00 

r. .1 $192.00 

Gentlemen: , ^ 

I, therefore, recommend that the appropriation for the 
year 1942 be the same. 

Repectfully submitited, 

ARTHUR ERASER, 

Dog Officer. 



—81- 



Report of the Town Nurse 



Board of Health 
Acton, Mass. 

Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit my report as Town Nurse for year 
ending Dec. 31, 1941. 

Bedside Nursing calls 1,516 

Welfare calls 253 

Pre-natal calls 134 

Child Welfare 129 

Social Service 92 

The diphtheria prevention clinic was held in the Spring 
and was very well attended. One case of diphtheria was 
reported, undoubtedly causing a larger attendance. It should 
be stated that the person who was ill, had never had pro- 
tective treatments. Number of children attending Clinic was 
124. Schick tests given to determine immunity — 83, of that 
number 42 were pre-school pupils — 37 in school and 4 were 
teachers. 

The number of Toxoid injections — 160. The procedure 
has been to give three doses at weekly intervals. 

At the Middlesex County Hospital at Waltham, 16 people 
were X-rayed and given physical examinations at physicians 
request. This service is free to all members of our commu- 
nity, its purpose being the detection and control of tuber- 
culosis by early treatment. Every year our town participates 
in the sale of Christmas Seals, the proceeds are used for tuber- 
culosis prevention programs. Mr. Thomas Byron of the Center 
is our local secretary and treasurer. A portion of the funds 
collected are used for projects in our community.. Last year 
a girl was sent to our Health Camp for a period of 8 weeks. 
It is also helpful in making our school milk program possible 
for all children. 



—82— 

The common cold with its more severe complications 
is still the greatest cause of school absences. It seems unwise 
to send a child to school during the infectious stages, for it 
is often the forerunner of a contagious disease. 

In time of national emergency, it becomes even more 
important than ever that we avail ourselves of the public 
health services of our Community and attempt to improve 
the personal health of ourselves and families. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



Report of the Board of Health 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Health of Acton herewith submits the fol- 
lowing report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1941. 

We regret to report that there was a run of communi- 
cable diseases during the year. Measles, while not especial- 
ly serious, i cached large proportions and a total of 215 per- 
sons were treated. 

At the very start of the year we experienced the possi- 
bility of a scarlet fever epidemic and immediately took steps 
to prevent it arid keep it under control. A total of twelve 
cases was reported. 

The diphtheria clinic was carried on again this year and 
over 150 persons took advantage of it. 

Applications were received for permission to operate 
overnight cabins. Therefore it becomes necessary to have 
published and issued rules and regulations, conforming with 
state regulations and suitable for this town's requirements. 

The maintanance of the town dump for the exclusive use 



—83— 

of the citizens of the Town of Acton has been our big problem. 
Persons from some of the surrounding towns were using the 
dump regularly and in many cases with no regard as to where 
the refuse was left. (Even some of our own citizens have 
been that careless.) 

In order to keep the expense of maintenance of the dump 
down and to accommodate the town's people wishing to use 
it, the Board deemed it necessary to have it open only on 
certain days, and under supervision. At first it was open 
Wednesdays and Saturdays but this proved inadequate to 
accommodate all the citizens desiring to use it and, there- 
fore, we arranged to have it open on Mondays also. Thus 
far that plan seems to be working out very well. 

At the first outbreak of rabies in this state for almost a 
year, the selectmen issued orders that all dogs be restrained 
for a period of ninety days. In this connection the Board 
established a clinic for the innoculation of all dogs against 
this dreaded disease. The way the dog owners co-operated 
and responded to this opportunity was very pleasing to the 
Board. 

With the expense of maintaining the town dump and 
other unpredictable health expenses of the town we recom- 
mend the appropriation of $1200.00, the same as last year. 

Record of Contagious Diseases Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1941. 

Dog-bite 17 

German Measles 1 

Scarlet Fever 12 

Measles 215 

Tuberculosis 1 

Undulant Fever 1 

Chicken Pox 1 

Diphtheria 1 

Whooping Cough 3 

Syphilis 1 

Mumps 1 

Opthalmia Neonatorum 1 



-84- 



Deaths: 



Residents who died in other towns 13 

Total deaths recorded 39 

Residents of Acton 36 

Residents of other places 3 

Respectfully submitted, 

O. L. CLARK, M.D., Chairman 
L. H. CRAM, Secretary 
LILLIAN TAYLOR 
ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, Agent 



—85— 



Report of Tax Collector 



1939 Town Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $11,340.25 

Interest 738.86 

$12,079.11 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $11,968.51 

Abated 64.40 

Tax Titles 46.20 

$12,079.11 

1940 Town Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $26,092.26 

Interest 470.32 

$26,562.58 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer . $16,628.76 

Tax Titles 44.02 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 9,889.80 

$26,562.58 

1941 Town Tax 

Dr. 

Committed $89,690.90 

Interest 28.75 



$89,719.65 



—86— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $64,835.01 

Abated 1,494.55 

Tax Titles . . V . . V 227.20 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $23,162.89 

$89,719.65 

1939 Personal Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $861.72 

Interest 62.84 

f924.56 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer 924.56 

$924.56 

1940 Personal Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $1,522.10 

Interest 21.35 

$1,543.45 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $706.92 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 836.53 

$1,543.45 

1941 Personal Tax 

Dr. 

Committed $11,441.00 

Interest 3.43 

$11,444.43 



—87— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $10,196.97 

Abated 32.66 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 1,214.80 

$11,444.43 
1937 Excise 

Dr. 
Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $168.59 

$168.59 
Cr. 

Abated $168.59 

$168.59 
1939 Excise 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $287.13 

Interest 3.72 

$290.85 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $38.24 

Abated 244.48 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 8.13 

$290.85 
lf)40 Excise 
Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $1,481.71 

Committed 61.57 

Interest 11.70 

$1,554.98 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,359.23 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 195.75 

$1,554.98 



—88— 

1941 Excise 

Dr. 

Committed $9,389.70 

Interest 6.71 

$9,396.41 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer ' $8,327.45 

Abated 286.19 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 782.77 

$9,396.41 

1939 Poll Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $108.00 

Interest 5.28 

Cost 14.00 

$127.28 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $100.93 

Abated 24.00 

Adjustment 2.35 

$127.28 

1940 Poll Tax 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1941 $294.00 

Interest 3.81 

Cost 22.40 

$320.21 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $162.21 

Abated 86.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 72.00 

$320.21 



-89— 



1941 Poll Tax 
Dr. 

Committed Jan. 1, 1941 $1,890.00 

Cost 30.45 

$1,920.45 
Or. 

Paid Treasurer $1,470.45 

Abated 146.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 304.00 

$1,920.45 

SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

January 1, 1942 
Total Debits 

1939 Town Tax $12,079.11 

1940 Town Tax 26,562.58 

1941 Town Tax 89,719.65 

1939 Personal Tax 924.56 

1940 Personal Tax 1,543.45 

1941 Personal Tax 11,444.43 

1937 Excise Tax 168.59 

1939 Excise Tax 290.85 

1940 Excise Tax 1,554.98 

1941 Excise Tax 9,396.41 

1939 Poll Tax 127.28 

1940 Poll Tax 320.21 

1941 Poll Tax 1,920.45 

$156,052.55 
Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $116,719.24 

Abated 2,546.87 

Tax Titles 317.42 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 36,466.67 

Adjustment 2.35 

$156,052.55 



CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes 



-go- 



Forest Warden's Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Your Forest Warden submits the report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1941. 

Total number of fires responded to 141 

Cut of town calls 5 

Total Labor cost of extinguishing $1,302.05 

Total Property loss in dollars and cents $1,030.00 

The Forest fire truck and equipment is in good condition 
considering the age of the truck, which is now almost 12 years 
old. 

This year a Forest Fire Patrol must be put on during the 
fire season which will be approximately six to eight weeks. 
This patrol is required by State Law, and will consist of four 
men, eight hours a day, seven days a week. Each man is sup- 
posed to cover one hundred miles per day. The compensation 
will be at the rate of regular town employees and a mileage 
fee for using their automobile. This patrol is to stop all parkers 
and to keep automobiles moving on back roads, to extinguish 
small fires, to report all fires and to keep a record of all sus- 
picious automobiles. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



-91- 



Fire Department 

January 28, 1942 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1941. The total number of alarms responded to by 
the entire department are as follows: 

Building 15 

Automobile 2 

Chimney 13 

False 2 

Out of Town 1 

Fires as a result of oil heaters 2 

Total labor cost of extinguishing $501.20 

Total Property loss $8,912.00 

The ladder truck at South Acton should be replaced this 
year as it has now become unsafe to operate on the highway, it 
is really in a serious condition. 

With the fear of a possible air raid I feel that the firemen 
that do not have coats, helmets and boots should be equipped 
with them. 

The alarm system is now complete and is certainly going 
to be a big advantage in air raid alarms. I think that as soon as 
possible Fire alarm boxes should be installed through the cen- 
tral part of the town. 

We now have, or will in the near future, a good supply of 
hose, and it should be adequate except perhaps for some grave 
emergency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 
Chief of the Fire Department. 



—92- 



Welfare Department Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: 

The annual report of the Board of Public Welfare is hereby 
submitted. 

Practically all assistance rendered in 1941 under Tempor- 
ary Aid or General Relief was given to persons who for various 
reasons were unemployable. As this was anticipated at the 
beginning of the year, a substantial reduction was made in the 
appropriation for this type of relief. Also, a small balance 
was left at the close of the year. This condition will probably 
continue to exist throughout the year 1942. However, there is 
a possibility that aid to Employables may show an increase be- 
cause of private industry being compelled to curtail in number 
of employees due to production limitations ordered by the gov- 
ernment. This condition has already been the cause for appli- 
cation for assistance. 

In the report submitted by this board last year, we referred 
to pending legislation pertaining to relief. On October 30, 1941, 
an Act making a number of changes in the Old Age Assistance 
law was passed, the majority of which go into effect April 30, 
1942. These changes not only liberalized minimum amounts to 
be paid, but also liberalized or removed altogther certain re- 
strictions as to eligibility to receive this assistance. It will be 
necessary to increase assistance in a large number of cases be- 
cause of the above changes and also will probably result in an 
increase in case load. Unless assistance is granted as provided 
in the law, no reimbursement will be made by the State Depart- 
ment. Because of the above changes, it will be necessary to 
increase the appropriation for Old Age Assistance. 

Although we do not anticipate any changes in Aid to De- 



—93— 

pendent Children, we feel a slight reduction can be made in 
the appropriation as there was a balance at the close of the 
year. 

We submit statistical reports for the year 1941. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. BACKMAN, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
RAYMOND L. HATCH, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



TEMPORARY AID 

Case Load Cases Cases 

December 31, 1940 11 28 

December 31, 1941 6 9 

Cases Aided, 1941 

Acton Settled 17 38 

Other Settlements— Unsettled 4 17 

Acton Settled — In other places 7 12 

28 67 

Total Aid $4,662.98 

Employables $926.60 

Unemployables 2,473.35 

Acton cases — out of town 1,263.03 

$4,662.98 

Unsettled $463.66 

Out of Town Settled 538.00 

$1,001.66 

Approximate Cost to Acton $3,661.32 

Less Acton Cases out of Town 1,263.03 

Total Acton Resident Cases $2,398.29 



—94— 

Rent $709.44 

Cash 1,604.00 

Clothing 3.35 

Food 389.16 

Fuel and Light 413.50 

Medical 110.00 

Hospitalization 70.50 

Burial * 100.00 



$3,399.95 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Case Load Cases Cases 

December 31, 1940 83 

Added during year 13 

Closed during year 13 

December 31, 1941 83 

Acton cases in other towns 8 

Out of Town and Unsettled Cases in Acton 19 

Appropriation $15,500.00 

Federal Grants 13,693.21 

Federal Grant Balance 1 a 41 670.70 

$29,863.91 

Cash Disbursements $28,594.17 

Acton Cases in Other Towns 629.60 



$29,223.77 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Case Load Cases Cases Individuals 

December 31, 1940 7 21 

Closed during year 3 

Added during year 2 

December 31, 1941 6 17 

Appropriation $2,300.00 

Federal Grants 1,371.55 

Federal Grant Balance 1/1/41 166.64 

$3,838.19 
Cash Disbursements $3,083.04 



—95— 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

Appropriations recommended for 1942: 

Old Age Assistance $18,000.00 

Temporary Aid 5,500.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,000.00 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



FEDERAL SURPLUS COMMODITIES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

Although the expense to the Town of Acton for partici- 
pating in Federal Surplus Commodities for the year 1942 again 
increased slightly, it was felt that the benefits received by per- 
sons participating in the Town of Acton, warrant this expense. 
Therefore, this bill was submitted to your board for payment. 
During the year, 1941, the value of commodities distributed in 
Acton was as follows: Direct distribution of Food, $3,171.34; 
Clothing, $1,007.65. Combined value of both food and clothing 
for the year 1941 being $4,178.99. 

The amount contributed by the Town of Acton is the pro- 
portionate share of administrative expenses of the Surplus 
Commodities Division, consisting of Equipment Rental, Freight 
and Transportation, Necessary Supplies, Printing, Salaries for 
Supervision, and Miscellaneous Expenses. 

Although the uncertainty of conditions in the coming 
year is referred to in the report of the Surplus Commodities 
Division, this reference is only as it may relate to the in- 
creased cost of material and supplies, etc., no reference is made 
to curtailment. We, therefore, assume this service will be 
available for the coming year. 

CARL E. BACKMAN, Chairman, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



-96— 



Tieasiiier''s Report 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1941. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1941 $48,380.30 

Receipts for 1941: 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Aid Dependent Children $1,583.32 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 14,149.60 

Highways 10,815.04 

Aid Dependent Children, Federal 1,371.55 

Income Tax 12,083.82 

Aid Indigent Persons 9.00 

Old Age Assistance 10,091.18 

Temporary Aid 164.97 

Loss on Taxes 596.16 

Tuition 779.84 

Highways Chapter 420 4,232.41 

Vocational Education 108.09 

Training Schools 55.06 

Business Corporation Tax 9,711.27 

State Aid 250.00 

Military Aid 356.00 

Veteran's Exemption 24.43 

Highway Fund 4,232.40 

Aid and Transportation 778.03 

$71,392.17 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Dog Refund $525.78 

Highways 1,990.61 

Dog Officer 196.00 

$2,712.39 



—97— 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee: 
Collector of Taxes: 

Town, 1939 $11,229.65 

Poll 1939 82.00 

Excise, 1939 34.52 

Personal, 1939 861.72 

Town, 1940 15,337.11 

Excise, 1940 1,347.53 

Personal, 1940 685.57 

Poll, 1940 136.00 

Town, 1941 62,705.65 

Excise 1941 8,088.66 

Poll, 1941 1,440.00 

Costs 66.50 

Interests 1,354.77 

Personal, 1941 13,349.56 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Director Standard, Licenses $24.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, Dog Licenses 18.60 

Elwin Hollowell, Care Lots 255.50 

Elwin Hollowell, Foundations 63.00 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 416.00 

Fred Kennedy, Lowering Device ... 57.00 

Fred Kennedy, Care Lots 439.75 

Fred Kennedy, Sale Lots, Mt. Hope 77.00 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations 161.38 

Boston & Maine R. R., Snow Removal 12.50 

Boston & Maine R. R. Forest Fires .... 13.90 

Selectmen, Licenses 56.00 

Selectmen, Sale Settees 8.00 

Selectmen, Sale Plat. Scales 8.00 

Cancelled Checks 44.40 

Concord Dis't Court, Fines 425.60 

Board of Health, Nurse Services ... 144.00 

Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines 20.84 

Arthur F. Davis, Sale Magazines .... 6.95 



$116,719.24 



—98— 

Horace F. Tuttle, Riem. Burial Ex- 
penses 361.21 

O. D. Wood, Rent Hall 173.00 

Town of Acton, Machinery Account 748.82 

Harlan E. Tuttle, Dog Licenses 744.80 

Welfare Department. Reimbursement 70.21 

Merchants National Bank, Loan 25,000.00 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition 1,214.73 

Ralph Rogers, Rent, Hail 167.00 

Merchants National Bank, H. S. Notes 16,000.00 
Merchants National Bank, Prem. on 

Notes 162.00 

George Richardson, Tuition 98.70 

Board of Health, Milk Licenses 7.50 

Board of Health, Pasteurize Licenses 20.00 

Board of Health, Garbage Licenses 11.00 

Board of Health, Miscellaneous 8.00 

Town of Concord, Welfare 300.20 

Town of Wrentham, Old Age Assist. 128.44 

Town of Westford, Schools 217.44 

Town of Maynard, Old Age Assist. 27.50 

Town of East Bridgewater, Welfare 485.50 

Town of Winchester, Old Age Assist. 55.00 

Second Nat'l Bank, Sec. 6A Chapt. 44 10,000.00 

Second National Bank, Interest .12 

City of Boston, Schools 115.56 

Town of Marblehead, Old Age Assist. 30.00 

Clare Milbery, Sealer Weights 80.06 

Town of Stow, Old Age Assist 85.00 

Theron A. Lowden, Prem. Refund 42.19 

Town of Arlington, Old Age Assist. . . 142.00 

Town of Concord, Land Tax 25.12 

City of Brockton, Old Age Assist 46.67 

Horace E. Tuttle, Sale Lots, Wood- 
lawn 90.00 

City of Newton, Welfare 5.00 

Elizabeth Richardson and Heirs, Tax 

Title 219.38 



—99— 

Elizabeth Lillian Richardson and 

Heirs, Interest 24.43 

Clarice Dunn, Care Green Lot 3.00 

Carrie M. Durkee, Certificates 23.00 

Orson Miller, Prem. Refund 16.78 

City of Boston, Welfare 107.75 

Arthur Fraser, Sale of Dogs 6.00 

Transfer, Cemetery Fund 1,410.19 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 1,532.31 

Transfer, Memorial Library 420.69 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund 25.00 

$62,703.72 

Total Cash Receipts $253,527.52 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1941 48,380.30 



Sum Total for 1941 $301,907.82 

Payments in 1941: 

Selectmen's Orders $227,506.35 

State Taxes 11,365.35 

$238,871.70 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1941 $63,036.12 

Outstanding Notes and Bonds 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 160, 

due June 26, 1942 $25,000.00 

High School Bonds, due 1942 to 1945 4,000.00 

High School Addition Notes, 161 to 176 due 1942 to 

1957 16,000.00 

Anticipation Section 6A Chapter 44, General Laws, 

Note 177, due Feb'y 25, 1942 from State and 

County 10,000.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 

Principal Fund $82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 69.75 

$82,308.52 



—100— 

Received Interest: 

North Middlesex Savings $60.00 

Franklin Savings 60.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 64.76 

Athol Savings 60.00 

Arlington Five Cent Savings 80.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings ' 60.00 

Leominster Savings 75.00 

Worcester North Savings 60.00 

Cambridge Savings 87.50 

Hudson Savings 112.50 

Marlboro Savings 112.50 

Waltham Savings 100.00 

East Cambridge Savings 60.00 

Andover Savings 80.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 100.00 

Home Savings 60.00 

Lexington Savings 80.00 

Winchendon Savings 150.00 

Farmer's & Mechanics 100.00 

Medford Savings 60.00 

Wildey Savings . 50.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) 16.05 



Balance December 31, 1941: 

Andover Savings $4,000.00 

Arlington Savings 4,000.00 

Athol Savings 3,000.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Cambridge Savings 3,500.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 5,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 3,000.00 

Farmer's and Mechanics Savings .... 5,000.00 

Frankhn Inst. Savings 3,000.00 



$1,778.31 
$84,086.83 



—101— 

Home Savings 3,000.00 

Hudson Savings 5,000.00 

Leominster Savings 3,000.00 

Lexington Savings 4,000.00 

Lynn Five Cent Savings 2,500.00 

Marlboro Savings 4,500.00 

Medford Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,238.95 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) . 315.57 

North Middlesex Savings 3,000.00 

Springfield Inst. Savings 3,000.00 

Waltham Savings 4,000.00 

Wildey Savings 2,500.00 

Winchendon Savings 5,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 4,000.00 

$82,554.52 

Transfer to Town Account 1,532.31 



Cemetery Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 

Principal Fund $42,687.21 

Unexpended Balance 3,087.80 



Received for Perpetual Care: 
Florence V. Woodward, Lot, Mt. Hope 
Wilhs J. Middleton, Lot, Woodlawn 
Adele Johnson, Lot, Woodlawn 
Benjamin T. Yates, Lot, Woodlawn 
M. J. Handley, Lot, Mt. Hope . . 
Frank S. Atwood, Lot, Mt. Hope 
Charles Edwards, Lot, Woodlawn 
Horace F. Tuttle, Lot, Woodlawn . 
William Conant, Lot, Woodlawn 
George B. Parker, Lot, Woodlawn 
Ernest G. Banks, Lot, Mt. Hope 



100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


200.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


175.00 


100.00 



$84,086.83 



$45,775.01 



$1,275.00 



-102- 



Received Interest: 

North Middlesex Savings $129.08 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 69.50 

Athol Savings 21.00 

Worcester North Savings 30.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 37.50 

Assabet Inst. Savings 6.00 

Hudson Savings » 54.00 

Marlboro Savings 62.50 

Maynard Trust Co 56.44 

Boston Five Cent Savings 40.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 44.00 

Suffolk Savings 45.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 30.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 5.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 30.00 

Chalestown Five Cent Savings 6.00 

Home Savings 20.00 

East Cambridge Savings 40.00 

Centrar Savings 28.00 

West and South Water Bonds 42.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 43.30 

Assabet Inst. Savings 32.14 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) . . 47.80 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 24.24 



Balance December 31, 1941: 

Assabet Inst. Savings $1,631.67 

Assabet Inst. Savings 3,450.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 300.00 

Athol Savings 1,050.00 

Boston Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Central Savings 1,600.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings ... 250.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 



$943.50 
$47,993.51 



—103— 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 300.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Home Savings 1,000.00 

Hudson Savings 2,400.00 

Marlboro Savings • 2,500.00 

Maynard Trust Co 3,228.96 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (income) . . 1,519.45 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 3,475.00 

North Middlesex Savings 6,454.00 

Suffolk Savings 3,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 1,500.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,200.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 824.24 

West and South Water Bonds 900.00 

$46,583.32 

Transfer to Town Account 1,410.19 



Note: West and South Water Bond, 
redeemed, funds deposited in 
Central Savings Bank 
($300.00) 



^fc>^ 



Elizabeth White Fund 

Balance January 1. 1941: 

Principal Fund $25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 1,390.97 

Received Interest: 

Athol Savings $40.00 

Amherest Savings 50.00 

Worcester North Savings 15.00 

North Middlesex Savings 40.00 

Lawrence Savings 40.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 50.00 

Marlboro Savings 50.00 



$47,993.51 



$26,390.97 



—104— 

Waltham Savings 50.00 

Andover Savings 40.00 

East Cambridge Savings 40.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 40.00 

Lowell Inst. Savings 40.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 40.00 

Hudson Savings (income) 14.48 

North Middlesex Savings, (income) .. 16.07 

565.55 

$26,956.52 
Balance December 31, 1941: 

Amherest Savings $2,000.00 

Andover Savings 2,000.00 

Athol Savings 2,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 2,000.00 

East Cambridge Savings 2,000.00 

Hudson Savings (income) 654.48 

Lawrence Savings 2,000.00 

Lowell Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 2,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings (income) . . 927.04 

Waltham Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester Five Cent Savings 2,000.00 

Worcester North Savings 1,000.00 

$26,581.52 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1941 375.00 



$26,956.52 



Wilde Memorial Library Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 

Principal Fund $9,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 465.29 

Susan Agusta & Luther Conant Fund 1,000.00 

Hiram Hapgood Fund 200.00 



—105— 



Luke Tuttle Fund 




200.00 




John W. Heald Fund 




934.19 
2,352.34 




Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 




Minnie Davis Fund 




336.50 










$14,488.32 






Received Interest: 








West Shore R. R. Bond 




$40.00 




Massachusetts Savings 
City Inst. Savings 




20.00 






20.00 




Cambridge Savings 




8.40 




Middlesex Inst. Savings 
Warren Inst. Savings . . 




20.00 






40.00 




Home Savings 




20.00 




Charlestown Five Cent Savings 


60.00 




Cambridge Savings (Hosmer) 


59.16 




Middlesex Inst. Savings 


(Heald) . . . . 


18.77 




Maynard Trust Co., (income) 


16.04 










$322.37 







$14,810.69 

Balance December 31, 1941: 

Cambridge Savings $2,411.50 

Cambridge Savings 336.50 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings .... 3,000.00 

City Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Home Savings 1,000.00 

Massachusetts Savings 1,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 952.96 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 1,000.00 

Warren Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Maynard Trust Co 400.00 

Maynard Trust Co., (income) 289.04 

West Shore R. R. Bond 1,000.00 

$14,390.00 



Transfer to Town Account 420.69 

$14,810.69 



$13,569.50 



—106— 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 

Principal Fund $13,500.00 

Unexpended Balance 69.50 

Received Interest: 

North Middlesex Savings $40.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings ' 40.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings 40.00 

Marlboro Savings 75.00 

Hudson Savings 56.25 

Lexington Savings 40.00 

Assabet Inst. Savings (income) 1.74 

S292.99 

$13,862.49 
Balance December 31, 1941: 

Assabet Inst. Savings (income) $62.49 

Assabet Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

Hudson Savings 2,500.00 

Lexington Savings 2,000.00 

Marlboro Savings 3,000.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings 2,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings 2,000.00 

$13,562.40 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1941 300.00 



$13,862.49 



Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 
Balance $1,499.77 

Received Interest: 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings $2.31 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings 5.97 

Massachusetts Savings 20.01 

Warren Inst. Savings 2.07 

30.36 

$1,530.13 



■107- 



Balance December 31, 1941: 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings 
Charlestown Five Cent Savings 
Massachusetts Savings 
Warren Inst. Savings 



Transfer to Town Account 



$117.51 
303.84 
978.72 
105.06 



1.505.13 
25.00 



Cemetery Surplus 

Balance January 1, 1941: 
Balance 

Received Interest: 
Assabet Inst. Savings 



Balance December 31, 1941: 
Assabet Inst. Savings 



Sarah J, Green Fund 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest: 
Assabet Inst. Savings 



Balance December 31, 1941 
Assabet Inst. Savings 



Balance December 31, 1941: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings 



$1,530.13 

$1,003.37 

20.16 

$1,023.53 

$1,023.53 

$150.00 

1.00 

$151.00 

$151.00 



West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 
Balance $609.99 

Received Interest: 
Middlesex Inst. Savings 12.25 



$622.24 
$622.24 



_108— 
Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941: 

Principal Fund $1,875.00 

Unexpended Balance 128.40 

$2,003.40 

Received to Fund: 

Company Salaries $230.00 

Middlesex Inst. Savings (interest) 40.38 

270.38 



Respectfully submitted, 



$2,273.78 

Balance December 31, 1941: 

Middlesex Inst. Savings $2,238.53 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1941 35.25 



$2,273.78 



WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



■109— 



Report of the Town Accountant 



February 10, 1942 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report covering the financial transac- 
tions of the town for the year ended December 31. 1941. 

The financial condition of the town is excellent as you w^iil 
notice by the balance sheet. 

At a special town meeting in December the town voted 
to appropriate $7,907.15 from surplus revenue. Please note that 
after making these appropriations the surplus account at the 
end of 1941 is a little more than one year ago. 

This past year the town borrowed -$16,000 on account of 
the addition to the high school. These notes bear interest at 
iy2% and mature $1,000 annually from 1942-1957. 

There is still outstanding $4,000 in notes on the original 
high school building which mature $1,000 annually from 1942- 
1945. This will make the payments on the bonded debt $2,000 
annually for the next 4 years; after that it will be reduced 
to $1,000 annually. 

I have audited the books of the tax collector and verified 
the cash on hand. I have audited the books of the treasurer 
and verified the several trust funds in his custody. I have 
verified the funds in the custody of trustees. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



-110- 





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—lie- 
Cash Receipts and Departmental Expenditures 

Treasurer's Receipts 

See Treasurer's Itemized Report $253,527.52 

Cash Balance January 1, 1941 48,380.30 

$301,907.82 



EXPENDITURES 

General Government 

Selectmen's Department 

James E. Kinsley, salary $283.33 

W. Burton Harvey, salary 200.00 

George A. Morse, salary 166.67 

Ralph W. Piper 50.00 

James E. Kinsley, attending meetings . 6.25 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 755.00 

Virginia Milbery, postage 42.00 

Virginia Milbery, sundry items 4.73 

Vesta Balsor, services 173.50 

Memorial Press, Town Reports 366.00 

Ass'n of Finance Committees 10.00 

Middlesex County Selectmen's Ass'n 6.00 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books, stationery . . 4.07 

Sanderson's, stationery 4.05 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 3.13 



$2,074.73 



Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee, salary $1,000.00 

Carrie M. Durkee, postage 91.59 
Carrie M. Durkee, expenses to Registry of 

Deeds advertising a/c tax titles . 58.74 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 58.46 

Robinson Seal Co., forms 9.99 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 10.24 



$1,229.02 



—117— 

Assessors' Department 

Albert P. Durkee, salary $300.00 

Henry L. Haynes, salary 300.00 

Carl W. Flint, salary 300.00 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 14.46 

Robinson Seal Co., forms 47.50 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books 13.45 

L. L. Applin, transfers 18.22 

Cullinane's Express .35 

George R. Barnstead & Son, tax cards .... 1.00 

Albert P. Durkee, attending meetings .... 25.00 

Henry L. Haynes, attending meetings .... 15.00 

Carl W. Flint, attending meetings 10.00 



Treasurer's Department 

Wm. Henry Soar, salary $500.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage 110.35 

Wm. Henry Soar, certifying notes 4.00 

Wm. Henry Soar, telephone 8.30 

Wm. Henry Soar, stationery 3.20 

Wm. Henry Soar, expenses to Boston .... 8.00 

Murphy & Snyder, envelopes 22.85 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 11.11 

Louis & Rice, repairing typewriter 8.00 

Maynard Trust Co., deposit box 5.55 

Todd Sales Co., ribbon 2.50 



Town Accountant 

Howard L. Jones, salary $483.33 

Howard L. Jones, postage 8.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., books 17.77 



Town Clerk 

Harlan E. Tuttle, salary $166.67 

Recording vital statistics 102.00 



$1,044.98 



$683.86 



$509.10 



—118— 

Harlan E. Tuttle, telephone 15.00 

Harlan E. Tuttle, postage 13.50 

Harlan E. Tuttle, attending meetings .... 10.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., stationery 13.70 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 63.95 

Robinson Seal Co., binding statistics .... 35.34 

Thomas Groom & Co., rebinding 10.50 

$430.66 

Public Welfare 

Carl E. Backman, salary $125.00 

Raymond L. Hatch, salary 75.00 

Mary M. Laffin 75.00 

$275.00 

Board of Health 

Dr. O. L. Clark, salary $25.00 

Dr. O. L. Clark, postage and telephone . 2.50 

Lowell H. Cram, salary 15.00 

Lowell H. Cram, postage, telephone 1.14 

Lillian F. Taylor, salary 10.00 

$53.64 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 

Waldo Flint, salary $50.00 

Waldo Flint, travel expense 9.60 

Kenneth Webber, Treas., membership 

dues, state ass'n 2.00 

$61.60 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest Allsopp, salary $125.00 $125.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Clare Milbery, salary and transportation $200.00 
Clare Milbery, expenses at conference 6.50 

Robinson Seal Co., supplies 11.33 

$217.83 



—119— 

Election and Reg'i^stration 

Albert P. Durkee, moderator $25.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, registrar 20.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, recount and listing ... 65.00 

William B. Feeley, registrar 20.00 

William B. Feeley, recount and listing 66.80 

Arthur W. Lee, registrar 20.00 

Arthur W. Lee, recount and listing 50.00 

Harlan E. Tuttle, clerk 25.00 

Norman Perkins, posting warrants 5.00 

Michael Foley, posting warrants 5.00 

James W. Coughlin, election officer 5.00 

James A. Wayne, election officer 5.00 

Paul Coughlin, election officer 5.00 

Ralph Rogers, election officer 5.00 

Clarence Robbins, election officer 5.00 

Thomas Murray, election officer 5.00 

Merle Hayward, election officer 5.00 

Sophie Walsh, election officer 5.00 

Peter Duggan, election officer 5.00 

Katherine Kinsley, election officer 5.00 

Havelock Schnair, election officer 5.00 

Fannie Davis, election officer 5.00 

Robinson Seal Co., listing cards 21.93 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 83.89 

Newj-Enterprise Co., adv. 5.60 

William Lawrence, placing booths 1.00 

Clarence Braman, placing booths 1.25 

Oliver D. Wood, placing booths 1.75 

Louise E. Garceau, lunches 1.80 

Warren J. Davis, lunches 2.75 

South Acton News Co., lunches 1.55 

West Acton Woman's Club, rent 5.00 

Virginia Milbery, recount 1.50 

$489.82 

Total General Government $7,195.24 



-120- 



Bonds 

Maryland Casualty Co. Dep. Collector's 
Bond $5.00 

C. A. Durkee Insurance Agency Treasur- 
er, Collectors', Town Clerk's Bond . 246.50 



Buildings and Grounds 

Oliver D. Wood, janitor ' $153.40 

Oliver D. Wood, repairs 18.35 

Oliver D. Wood, care of clock and flag . . 28.50 

Ralph Rogers, janitor 175.75 

Ralph Rogers, care of clock 25.00 

Ralph Rogers, repair 5.55 

Bursaw Gas and Coil Co., fuel oil 221.98 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 29.60 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co 65.50 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 76.40 

Boston Edison Co 206.06 

Maynard Supply Co 9.32 

West and South Water Supply 19.89 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber 9.26 

A. W. Davis Co., coal, supplies 58.69 

H. J. Dowd Co., dust layer 9.85 

Wm. J. Gallagher, gas, oil 7.70 

Dewey Boatman, supplies 23.12 

R. J. Rodday Co., supplies 9.05 

Levi Perkins wood 6.00 

George Gutteridge, repairing clock 5.00 

Thomas E. Reed, valve 2.50 

Arthur Freese, repairs 3.50 

Ernest A. Knippel, repairs 2.00 

Pierce's Express .50 

Hosea Gould, carting refuse 6.25 

George C. Best, labor 16.50 
Boston Time System Service, repairing 

clock 74.35 

Parker Hardware Co., duster .98 



$251.50 



—121— 

Acton Pharmacy, supplies 

Hayward & Priest, repairs 

V. D. Lawson, labor 

N. E. Toro, plugs 

Middlesex Count}^ Farm Bureau, weed 

killer 

H. J. Schnair, resurfacing floor 

Atlantic Marine Co., rope 

James McAvenia, labor 

Com. of Mass., boiler inspection 

Burton Wayne, labor 

Samuel Knowlton, labor 

Wilho Anderson, repairing boiler . . . 

Arthur Wayne, labor 

Fred Kennedy, care of common 

John Pederson, truck 

Labor 

Trucks 



Police Department 

Michael Foley, salary and transportation $2,100.28 

Norman Perkins, salary and transportation 1,355.37 

George Morse, services 175.50 

Louise Leveroni, services 41.25 

Robert Willett, services 44.25 

Benjamin Sawyer, services 27.38 

Samuel Knowlton, services 17.25 

John Bradley, services 2.25 

Michael Foley, expenses a c raid 10.00 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 22.05 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 66.14 

A. W. Davis Co., hardware 1.25 

New England Tailors, uniforms 87.10 

Arthur Eraser 2.00 

South Acton News Co 7.20 

Sanderson's, stationery 4.25 

S. P. Gile Co., typewriter 79.50 



1.50 


19.91 


2.40 


1.70 


1.30 


68.00 


19.38 


7.50 


10.00 


8.75 


2.50 


2.00 


61.63 


10.00 


8.00 


38.00 


95.50 



$1,628.62 



—122- 



South Acton Dept. Store, bulbs 4.50 

Belmont Supply Co 38.25 

Wm. J. Gallagher, metal 5.00 

Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., supplies 74.40 



Fire Department 

Pay roll, annual $460.00 

Pay Roll, fires » 604.05 

Boston Edison Co 157.05 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 92.19 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 

rope 92.70 

A. W. Davis Co., coal, supphes 107.70 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., coal 164.61 

William Lawrence, janitor 120.00 

Iver Peterson, janitor 120.00 

Lyle Reynolds, janitor 40.00 

Clarence Robbins, janitor 10.00 

David Clayton, janitor 50.00 

Charles Whitcomb, janitor 20.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil, anti-freeze 34.36 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber 14.16 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas 27.74 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 31.14 

R. S. Baker, gas 11.73 

Ormal Laffin, gas 4.53 

Justin A. McCarthy Co., equipment 384.81 

Gorham Fire Equipment Co 21.90 

West & South Water Supply 36.00 

J. G. Flynn, towel service 12.00 

Acton Motor Co., repairs, parts 116.47 

Earl Hayward 9.00 

E. P. Gates, repairing hose rack 2.00 

W. E. Palmer Co., 100-ft. rope 3.75 

Wendell Putnam Jr., lights for windshield 2.85 

Fritz Oelschlegel, repairs .85 

Am. LaFrance Foamite Corp., equipment 75.34 



$4,165.17 



—123— 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 12.00 

Fangrieve Belting Co 6.91 

C. C. Cullinane .50 

L. W. Priest, repairs 8.32 

Hazelton Perkins 9.25 

James B. Wilson 1.75 

A. E. Sims, repairs 23.15 

$2,888.81 

Forest Fires 

Pay Rolls 1,404.20 

Fire Alarm System 

Louis W. Bills 2,205.00 

New Hose 

Justin A. McCarthy Co 1,062.40 

New Hose (Forest) 

Justin A. McCarthy Co 403.59 

Hydrant Rental 

West and South Water District $3,175.00 

Town of Concord - 253.00 

33,428.00 

Moth Department 

James J. Knight, Superintendent §423.60 

James J. Knight, truck 142.00 
James J. Knight, attending meeting, tel. 

supplies 6.56 

Harold Knight, labor 104.50 

Richard Lowden, labor 158.50 

Hugh Hodgen, labor 101.50 

Lester Carey, labor 8.00 

Ole Granberg, labor 89.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 60.12 

Niagara Sprayer & Chemical Co., lead 297.01 

Ohnstead Flint Corp., leather, Imiment 2.94 

Globe Rubber Works Inc., homerflex 16.98 

Richard Lowden, D & D 10.00 



—124— 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 2.00 

Jenks Tree Service, kolo spray 3.50 

Murphy & Snyder, notices 3.68 

John F. Coughlin, auto supplies 1.85 

Acton Motor Co., repairs 4.50 

Farquar Tire Service, tires 13.00 

Acton Pipe Co .50 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight, labor $442.31 

James J. Knight, truck 152.19 

James J. Knight, attending meeting 2.30 

Hugh Hogden, labor 222.00 

Harold Knight, labor 4.00 

Ole Granberg, labor 12.00 

Richard Lowden, labor 4.00 

George A. Braman, sharpening saws 1.85 

A. W. Davis Co., files, brushes 5.65 

Wm. P. Proctor Co, lumber 7.97 

Wyman Nurseries, trees 85.95 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., fertilizer 32.60 

J. S. Moore, sundry supplies 1.80 

E. P. Gates, tree irons 7.35 

Frost Insecticide Co., saws 4.32 

Morse Oil Co., gas 3.70 

W. Anderson, truck 10.00 



Health 

E. E. Allsop, labor at dump $105.50 

E. E. Allsopp, services as agent to Board 

of Health 161.05 

E. E. Allsopp, postage, telephone 3.66 

E. E. Allsopp, expenses to Boston 40.50 

Middlesex Couity Sanatorium 61.25 

Hosea Gould, truck . 33.00 

Hobbs & Warren Inc., books, licenses ... 8.57 

A. W. Davis Co., supplies 7.50 



$1,449.74 



$999.99 



—125— 

Dr. E. A. Mayell, professional services . . 155.00 

Dr. R. E. Hooper, professional services 48.00 

Dr. O. L. Clark, professional services .... 6.00 

W. J. Scanlon, labor at dump 440.50 

George H. Briggs, labor at dump 4.00 

Charles Byron, labor at dump 12.00 

John Nichols, labor at dump 4.00 

Thomas W. Reed Co., supplies 12.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co.. lumber 5.61 

Forham Fire Equipment Co., pump 15.24 

Greenough Bros. Co., bulldozer 22.00 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe fittings, labor 16.70 

Strong's Market, supplies 11.75 

D. F. Penney, milk 15.00 

J. S. Moore, supplies 15.57 

J. H. Connolly, supplies 6.24 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co 10.28 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., wire 15.75 

J. Waldo Braman, posts, labor 11.00 

E. P. Gates, bolts, hinges, etc. 10.00 

E. R. Sanborn, labor on gates \ 15.00 

News-Enterprise Co., posters, adv 32.25 

A. C. Gravlin, truck 1.50 

Ben. E. Derby, truck 1.50 

Laffin's Garage, gas, oil 10.82 

Acton Motor Co., labor, parts 3.65 

Murphy C Snyder, printing 5.35 

Dr. G. F. Malley, vac. dogs 60.00 

Eraser Kennels, services 15.00 

Lowell Sun, adv 7.00 

Town Nurse 

Genevieve Creeley, R.N., salary and 

transportation $2,000.00 

Acton Pharmacy, supplies 101.66 

Thomas W. Reed Co., supplies 7.50 

Johnson Pharmacy 2.00 

Meade & Wheeler Co., records 3.56 



$1,409.74 



$2,114.72 



. —126— 

HIGHWAYS 

Village 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 

patch $396.12 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., plank, 

spikes, etc 220.29 

Riverside Paint & Varnish Co., 

traffic paint * 36.62 

A. W. Davis Co., brooms, sash, 

door 8.55 

Maynard & Acton Oil Co., gas . .80 

M. W. Leahy Co., gravel 12.00 

M. I. Houghton Co., donets 1.50 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., cement .70 

Buff & Buff Mfg. Co., rental of 

transit 57.00 

Greenough Bros. Inc., sand, 

gravel 26.50 

John Pederson, cartage 5.00 

Am. Cyanamid & Chemical Co., 

acid 10.65 



Pay Rolls 

Labor 

Wm. C. Kazokas, supt $175.75 

James Johnston 60.00 

Jalmar Jarvi 7.50 

Edgar Perkins 9.25 

R. Reynolds 4.00 

George Rugg 14.75 

Louis Leveroni 72.25 

Norman Campbell 10.00 

Edwin Anderson 36.40 

Thomas Murray 27.50 

Joseph Paskiewicz 22.00 

Henry Bullette 6.00 



$775.73 



•127- 



Edwin Hall 9.50 

George Penney 15.00 

Vincent Sheehan 31.50 

Ansel Smart 4.00 

Lester Stiles 2.00 

Donald MacDougall 15.50 

Edwin Christofferson 20.00 

Waino Kangas 24.00 

Joseph Kuleisus 24.00 

Trucks 

George Morse $20.00 

Wilho Anderson 1.25 

Hcsea Gould 1.88 

Acton Motors 6.00 

Levi Perkins 16.25 

Clarence Robbins 18.75 

Albert Gravlin 50.00 

Equipment 
P. I. Perkins Co 



Chapter 81 

Berger Metal Culvert Co. $176.40 

A. Christofferson, gravel 150.75 

Ormal Laffin, gravel 59.55 
Leahy Washed Sand and Gravel 

Co., pea stone 51.89 

New England Metal Culvert Co. 110.54 
New England Asphalt & Tar Co., 

tar 1,785.25 
Standard Oil Co. of N. Y., road 

oil 3,769.58 

Mass. Broken Stone Co 136.81 

Am. Cyanamid & Chemical Co., 

dynamite, caps 109.25 

Edna Downey, sand 107.10 



590.90 



114.13 



17.40 



$1,498.16 



6,457.12 



—128— 

Pay Rolls 

Labor 

Wm. C. Kazokas, supt. $1,176.50 

James Johnston 515.00 

George Rugg 60.00 

George Penney 76.75 

Edgar Perkins 303.25 

Lester Stiles 46.00 

Norman Campbell .... * 293.50 

Donald MacDougall 63.50 

Joseph Paskiewicz 379.75 

Thomas Murray 371.25 

James Bradley 11.50 

Henry Bulette 47.50 

Louis Leveroni 283.65 

R. Liebfried 58.00 

Edwin Anderson 435.20 

Michael Sheehan • 52.00 

Vincent Sheehan 76.75 

John Nichols 125.50 

Edwin Christofferson 9.60 

Waino Kangas 8.00 

Joseph Kuleisus 8.00 

Ansel Smart 150.00 

Edward Hall 106.00 

George Downey 61.25 

Albert Gravlin 12.80 

Trucks 

Clarence Robbins $483.38 

Hosea Gould 362.00 

Wilho Anderson 531.88 

Albert Gravlin 572.88 

Levi Perkins 353.88 

Ralph Jones 301.63 

A. W. Davis 63.75 

Arthur Jalonen 198.25 

George Morse 195.63 

E. J. Clark 63.00 



4,731.25 



3,126.28 



—129— 

Equipment 

Clark Wilcox, sand spreader . $79.50 

Leonard J. Smith, shovel, com- 
pressor 779.50 

Conant Machine & Steel Co., 
loader 108.50 

P. I. Perkins, grader 1,478.00 

Town of Acton, sundry equip- 
ment 340.22 

2,785.72 

$17,100.37 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Standard Oil Co. of New York, 

road oil $1,706.18 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 

patch 1,661.63 

Edna Downey, sand 17.50 

State Prison Colony, posts 253.50 

$3,638.81 

Pay Rolls 

Labor 

William C. Kazokas, supt $238.50 

Edwin Anderson 103.20 

Edward Hall 73.00 

James Johnston 96.00 

Louis Leveroni 25.00 

Thomas Murray 89.50 

John Nichols 38.00 

Joseph Paskiewicz 85.50 

Ansel Smart 86.00 

George Downey 61.00 

Edgar Perkins 34.50 

Henry Bulette 38.00 

George Penney 42.00 

Vincent Sheehan 58.00 

R. Liebfried 32.50 

Donald MacDougall 36.00 



—130- 



Lester Stiles 22.00 

Waino Kangas 12.00 

Joseph Kuleisus 12.00 

Edwin Christofferson 4.80 

Trucks 

Wilho Anderson , $148.75 

Hosea Gould 91.25 

Levi Perkins 100.00 

Ralph Jones 60.00 

Albert Gravlin 125.00 

Clarence Robbins 167.50 

Norman Livermore 3.00 

Arthur Jalonen 10.00 



1,187.50 



705.50 



Equipment 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., 

spreader $30.00 

Conant Machine Co., loader 21.00 

Clark Wilcox Co., sand spreader 20.50 

Town of Acton 90.60 

P. I. Perkins Co., grader 306.80 



$468.90 



$6,000.71 



Chapter 90 Construction Main Street 

Standard Oil of N. Y., road oil $1,037.23 
Wm. P. Proctor Co., lumber, 

cement 32.20 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone 2,182.39 

Edna Downey, sand 7.20 

Swen Hagen,. gravel 125.50 
Jos. T. Ryerson Sons Inc., steel 

bars 57.36 

$3,441. 



-131— 



Payrolls 

Labor 

William C. Kazokas, Supt $477.00 

Edwin Anderson 304.00 

Edward Hall 192.80 

James Johnston 184.30 

R. Liebfried 19.00 

Thomas Murray 186.60 

Joseph Paskiewicz 170.40 

George Penney 114.40 

Andsel Smart 162.50 

George Downey 50.05 

Vincent Sheehan 145.00 

Donald MacDougall 60.80 

Albert Marsh 50.00 

C. Hewitt 11.20 

John Bradley 82.50 

Charles Byron 66.00 

Walter Boyce 12.00 

Waino Kangas 38.40 

Joseph Kuleisus 38.40 

Edwin Christofferson 88.00 

Will Charter 88.00 

Trucks 

Hosea Gould $320.75 

Albert Gravlin 404.00 

Pvalph Jones 17.25 

Clarence Robbins 382.00 

Wilho Anderson 381.50 

Levi Perkins 62.50 

George Morse 147.00 

Equipment 

P. I. Perkins Co., grader $420.00 

L. P. Boeske, shovel 468.75 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone 

spreader 50.00 



2,541.35 



1,715.00 



—132— 

Conant Machine & Steel Co., 
loader 43.75 

Town of Acton, sundry equip- 
ment 318.00 

1,300.50 

$8,998.73 

Snow Removal 

Ploughing Streets 

John Pederson $966.00 

Levi Perkins 240.00 

Edwin Christoflferson 557.38 

Davis Motor Co 396.00 

Reed Coal & Grain Co 237.00 

$2,396.38 

Sanding and Cleaning Villages 
Putting Up and Removing Snow Fences 

Labor $1,430.00 

Trucks 995.65 

B. W. Brown Grain Co., salt . . 197.80 

Edna Downey, sand 63.40 

Conant Machine Co., loader . . 40.25 

Clark & Wilcox, rental sand 

spreader 80.00 

Road Builders' Supply Co., salt 52.00 

2,859.10 

Sundry Items and Equipment 

P. I. Perkins Co., plough $460.00 

E. P. Gates, blades, repairs 130.05 

Conant Machine Cc, parts . . 24.08 

NuWay Welders Inc., welding 3.00 
International Harvester Co., 

chain .56 

E. W. Systrom Co., parts . . .' 60.85 

Hinds & Coon Co., belts 9.68 

Maynard Supply Co 1.32 

Anderson Engineering Co., 

hinge 2.25 



—133— 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas . . . 5.15 

Central Garage, gas, oil 3.75 

Acton Motor Co., welding . . 2.05 
A. W. Davis Co., enamel, brush- 
es 12.93 

Riverside Paint & Varnish Co., 

enamel 12.47 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., chain links 1.62 

P. I. Perkins Co., runnbers, bolt 17.12 
Maynard & Acton Oil Co. Inc., 

gas .80 



747.68 



Machinery Account 

Colonial Beacon Co., oil $33.11 

Pierce's Express .50 

American Chain Link Fence Co., drag .... 7.90 

Central Garage 39.32 

Laffin's Express 1.50 

Frank T. Bauer, lanterns 13.20 

State Prison, marking machines 85.00 

Eastern Auto Parts, grease kit .20 

Traffic & Road Equipment Co., steel 

brooms 25.35 

Oilmen's Service & Supply Co. 6.75 

New Idea Store, rubber coats 6.95 

Auto Shop, repairs .25 

Buff & Buff Mfg. Co., lerching rod 21.50 

Great Roads Garage, anti-freeze 27.00 

Ayer Motor Express .60 

C. C. Cullinane, express .75 

Parker Hardware Co 14.12 

Maynard Supply Co 17.32 

R. I. Perkins Co., parts 149.61 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 23.10 

Bursaw Gas & Oil Co., gas, oil 174.43 

E. P. Gates, repairs 95.95 

Conant Machine Co., parts 11.55 



$6,003.16 



—134— 

Acton Motor Co 5.15 

Maynard & Acton Oil Co. Inc., gas 121.34 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe 9.99 

Hedge Mattheis Co., parts, equipment . 28.17 
Wm. C. Kazokas, painting, repairing sand 

spreader 8.53 

Railway Express Agency 4.09 

Clark Wilcox Co., parts 64.93 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., twine 1.56 

$999.72 

Street Lighting 

Boston Edison Co $3,932.61 

Street Signs 

Acton Pipe Co., pipe $249.44 

Laffin's Express 3.10 

State Prison, signs 224.40 

Pay Rolls, labor 43.30 

Lowell Iron & Steel Co., rods 4.97 

$525.21 

Public Welfare 

Temporary Aid $3,406.55 

Town of Westford 407.43 

City of Somerville 210.84 

Mass. Dept. of Public Welfare 275.15 

City of Boston 129.40 

City of Worcester 81.40 

Town of Concord 35.12 

Administrative 

Hobbs & Warren Inc. 3.21 

$4,549.10 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Orders of the Board of Public Welfare $3,083.04 

Old Age Assistance 

Orders of the Supervisor of Old Age Assistance $29,223.77 



—135— 

Administrative Account 

Carl E. Backman, salary, transportation . $408.50 

Carl E. Backman, postage, tel 41.98 

Carl E. Backman, attending convention 

at Springfield 10.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Inc., forms, etc 11.37 

Murphy & Snyder, letterheads, envelopes 8.51 

Wm. Henry Soar, postage 4.29 

Boston Council Social Agencies 8.00 



$492.65 



Soldiers' Relief 

Orders of Soldiers' Relief Agent $1,579.46 

Military Aid 

Paid $495.00 

State Aid 

Paid $180.00 

Education 

Orders of School Committee as per their itemized 
report $47,369.01 

High School Addition 

Byron L. Moore, contract $16,888.83 

Charles W. Way, architect 979.00 

O'Brien Russell, bond 251.52 

Orson K. Miller, fire insurance 41.92 

Chandler & Barber Co., hardware 184.25 

Mass. Reformatory 367.40 

Jos. Scarlata, repairing lockers 7.75 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., reflectors, etc. . 121.00 

All Steel Equipment Co., lockers 674.60 

$19,516.27 



Library Maintenance 

Arthur F. Davis, hbrarian $122.50 
Arthur F. Davis, binding, cataloging, post- 
age, etc 61.36 

Ralph Rogers, janitor 154.50 



136— 



Ralph Rogers, repairs 5.50 

Mrs. Oliver D. Wood, ass't. librarian 132.50 

Boston Edison Co 59.53 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 331.21 

Ida Costello, libarian, West library 10.20 

Remington Rand Co., cards 2.85 

Chester B. Robbins, insurance 30.93 

West & South Water District 12.00 

Ralph Anderson, librarian, South library 28.00 
Ralph Anderson, fuel, transportation of 

books 7.50 

A. Merriarn Co., repairing chairs 16.45 

News-Enterprise Co 6.50 

Katherine Kinsley, librarian 101.00 

Katherine Kinsley, janitor, trans, books . . 36.40 

Printers and Bindery Supply Co., supplies 3.47 

Murphy & Snyder, slips 14.21 

Nashoba Oil Co 4.85 

Winifred Sylvia, librarian. South library 78.00 

Winifred S\dvia, transportation, fuel, etc. 31.25 



Library Books 

DeWolfe Fiske & Co 

H. R. Huntting Co 

Jean Karr Co 

New England News Co. 
Union Library Ass'n. 
Junior Literary Guild 

Chemical Pub. C 

Ginn & Co 

Wilcox & Follett Co 

D. Van Nostrand Co 

Acton Woman's Club 

Wilbur H. Siebert 

Indian Council 

Womrath Book Shops 

Encyclopaedia Brittanica 

D. C. Heath 



- $1,250.71 



$20.90 

103.26 

20.35 

73.14 

20.38 

55.50 

2.70 

2.48 

16.09 

4.73 

2.70 

3.34 

2.00 

33.59 

1.45 

6.28 



—137- 



Jordan Marsh Co 4.59 

Noble & Noble 1.54 

Osburn Publishing Co 1.67 

George H. W. Turner 2.00 

Herman Goldberger Agency 39.50 

Science Digest 2.50 

Cemeteries 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor $722.55 

Fred S. Kennedy, truck 15.00 

Fred S. Kennedy, supplies, gas, oil 15.83 

Duncan Kennedy, labor 460.32 

Joseph Gallant 10.00 

Elwin Hollowell, labor 321.25 

Elwin Hollowell, trucking 93.50 

Edwin Hollowell, postage 6.00 

Leonard Wooden, labor 146.00 

C. Hollowell, labor 28.80 

H. Hollowell, labor 8.00 

George Tuttle, labor 23.00 

Boston Edison Co. 9.75 

West & South Water District 50.30 

Holland Motor Co., gas, oil 13.33 

Albert Batley & Son, flowers 34.36 

Reed Coal &. Grain Co., cement, fertilizer 46.00 

Acton Pipe Co., bushing 70 

C. B. Robbins, insurance 8.00 

Albert Gravhn, trucking 22.25 

Perry Seed Co., tools 6.42 

James J. Knight, spraying 29.99 

A. W. Davis Co., tools 13.35 

George Cahoon, sharpening mowers .... 7.50 

Thomas J. Grey Co., seed 18.90 

Sudbury Nurseries, trees, shrubs 161.30 

Murphy & Snyder, printing 13.00 

Acton Monumental Co 6.00 

Hosea Gould, trucking, gravel, removing 

stumps 131.00 



$420.69 



—138— 



Jenks Tree Service, tree work 

Laffin's Express 

Power Lawn Mower Co., parts 

Jos. Harris Co., seed 

R. J. Rodday Co., tools 

E. P. Gates, repairs 

Horace Tuttle, writing and recording deeds 



50.00 

.35 

.95 

10.50 

3.20 

12.50 

5.00 

$2,504.90 



Susan Hosnier Fund 

Greenough Bros. Inc., removing stumps $104.00 

Sudbury Nurseries, Inc., trees 35.00 

Harlan E. Tuttle, tractor 24.00 

Power Lawn Mower Co., mower 148.85 

William Kazokas, labor 14.00 

P. I. Perkins Co., grader 42.00 

Flora Kilmartin, dressing 37.50 

Eraser Kennels, loam 26.40 

Hosea Gould, truck 80.00 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., lime 6.00 

Elwin Hollowell, labor 551.88 

Elwin Hollowell, trucking 76.00 

Leonard Warden, labor 380.00 

C. Hollowell, labor 4.80 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor 1.88 

Perpetual Care 

Fred S. Kennedy, labor $307.63 

Duncan Kennedy, labor 226.75 

Elwin Hollowell, labor 366.25 

Leonard Wooden, labor 253.00 

George Tuttle, labor 44.00 

C. Hollowell, labor 25.60 

H. Hollowell, labor 4.00 

Reed Coal & Grain Co., fertilizer 109.56 

Albert Batley & Son, flowers . . 73.40 



$1,532.31 



$1,410.19 



—139— 

Luke Blanchard Fund 

Fred S. Kennedy, care of lots $25.C0 

Art. 34— Shade Trees 

Jenks Tree Service $297.63 

Work Relief 

Surplus Commodities Division $182.11 

Treasurer U. S. A. Music Project 15.00 

$197.11 

Liability Insurance 

Theron A. Lowden, premium $663.13 

Memorial Day 

Hillside Florist, flowers $18.25 

Geo. H. Finan, wreaths 8.50 

William Cobleigh, flowers 21.78 

Lovell Bus Lines, Inc., transportation . 20.00 
South Acton News Co., refreshments 38.20 
Dorothy Davis, printing cards 2.50 
Town Shop, flags 25.25 
Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co., car- 
tridges 19.20 

Newton Post 48. A. L. Band 100.00 

$253.68 



Painting Town Hall— Art. 23 

Barton Wheeler & Sons, contract S459.00 

Barton Wheeler & Sons, setting glass 6.40 

Samuel E. Knowlton, interior painting 118.00 

$583.40 

New Seats for Town Hall— Art. 24 

Mass. Pveformatory $500.00 

Dog Officer 

Fraser Kennels S200.75 

Jones Community Field 

Eden Cahill, labor S62.50 

William Bradley, labor 20.00 



—140— 

Osgood Tuttle, labor 17.00 

David Maguire, labor 9.00 

Ralph T. Jones, truck 5.00 

Morse Oil Co., gas, oil 23.85 

J. S. Moore, lock, can 1.65 

Chester M. Sawtelle, power mower 150.00 



► 1940 Bills 

Arthur W. Lee, general gov't $22.00 

William B. Feeley, general gov't 24.00 

Walter L. O'Neil, general gov't 20.00 

J. G. Flynn, fire dept 1.00 

Morse Oil Co., fire dept 5.43 

Middlesex County Sanatorium, health 26.25 



Committee on Public Safety Defense 

Mary Laffin, expenses to Boston, 20 trips $30.00 

T. C. Gallagher, stationery, postage 12.61 

American Woolen Co., blankets 140.00 



Unclassified 

So. Acton Dept. Store, flags $18.20 

L. P. Townsend, circulars, postage a/c de- 
fense 5.99 

Commercial Supply, defense stickers 4.86 

C. A. Durkee Ins. Co., robbery insurance 50.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, releases, maps 3,80 

Duncan M. Ross, dinners 72.00 

Murphy & Snyder, printing, defense 4.50 
Dr. O. L. Clark, postage, supplies, etc., 

defense 20.80 

Howard A. Wilson, prof, services 15.00 

Acton Granite Co., boundary posts 3.50 

T. C. Gallagher, expenses, organizing 15th 

company, State Guard Reserves 16.75 
West Acton Woman's Club, rent of hall, 

defense 4.00 



$289.00 



$98.68 



$182.61 



—141— 

W. . Burton Harvey, perambulating town 

lines 20.00 

George Morse, perambulating town lines 10.00 
James E. Kinsley, perambulating town 

lines 20.00 

Leonard J. Smith, shovel, bulldozer 98.00 

Mabel Tobin, services a/c defense 15.00 

Mabel Tobin, certificates 1.00 

Murphy & Snyder, posters, defense 5.15 

$388.55 

Notes and Bonds 

Merchants National Bank, high school bonds $1,000.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 

Merchants National Bank, high school bonds $200.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 

Merchants National Bank $62.50 

No Appropriation Items 

Revenue Loans 

Merchants National Bank $25,000.00 

State tax $10,230.00 

State park tax 144.11 

State audit 684.82 

State for certain bridges 306.42 

County tax 5,892.62 

County hospital assessment 944.26 

$18,202.23 



Refunds 

Motor Vehicles excise taxes $355.95 

Real estate taxes 145.41 

Poll taxes 4.00 

S505.36 

Middlesex County Dog Licenses $833.00 

Refund cemetery land fund 10.00 

Tailings account 39.25 



—142— 
Certifying and printing high school notes 67.33 

Total expenditures $238,871.70 

Cash balance December 31, 1941 63,036.12 



$301,907.82 

Statement of Reserve Fund Transfers 

Moth department $250.00 

New hose 262.40 

Memorial Day 3.68 

Education 250.00 

Board of Health 209.74 

Building and Grounds 53.62 

Fire department 13.81 

New forest hose 3.59 

Highways, Village 48.16 

Highways, Chapter 81 .37 

Highways, Chapter 90 .71 

Snow removal 3.16 

Dog officer .75 

Cemetery 4.90 

Forest fires 872.05 

High school addition 16.71 

$1,993.65 
Unexpended balance 6.35 

$2,000.00 

Statement of Machinery Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941 $889.90 

Received from Town of Acton 748.82 

$1,638.72 

Tansferred to Road Machinery Account $851.52 
Balance December 31, 1941 787.20 

$1,638.72 



—143— 

Statement of Cemetery Land Fund 

Balance January 1, 1941 $67.35 

Received from sale of lots 167.00 



Paid: 

Refund $10.00 

Balance December 31, 1941 224.35 



$234.35 



$234.35 



-144— 



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€0- 









ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Department 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1941 



^149— 
ORGANIZATION 



School Committee 

Mr. Richard Lowden, Chairman Term expires 1942 

Mrs. Hazel O. Bundy Term expires 1944 

Miss Fannie Davis Term expires 1943 

Mr. Robert C. Hall Term expires 1942 

Mr. Edward A. Schmitz (until next election) Term expires 1943 
Mr. Walter B. Stevens Term expires 1944 

Meetings of the School Committee 
Regular meetings of the school committee shall be held the 
first Tuesday of each month in the high school at 7:30 p.m. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent Richard B. Greenman 

Office: High School Building, Tel. 110 

School Physician Dr. Ernest Mayell, Acton 

School Nurse Mrs. Genevieve Greeley, West Acton 

Attendance Officer Leonard Godfrey, West Acton 

Custodians: 

High School Daniel MacDougall 

Center School Ralph Rogers 

South School Benjamin Sawyer 

West School . Leonard Godfrey 

Tentative Calendar for 1942 

January 5 — Schools open. 

February 20 — Schools close. 

March 2 — Schools open. 

April 17 — Schools close. 

April 27 — Schools open. 

June 5 — Elementary schools close. 

June 12 — High School Graduation. 

June 19 — High School closes. 

September 9 — High School opens. 

September 14 — Elementary Schools open. 

October 12 — Holiday (Columbus Day) 



—ISO- 
October 30 — Teachers' Convention. 
November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day) 
November 26 and 27 — Holidays (Thanksgiving). 
December 18 — All schools close 
December 28 — All schools open. 

1943 
January 1 — Holiday. 
February 19 — Schools close. 
March 1 — Schools open. 
April 16 — Schools close. 
April 26 — Schools open. 
May 31— Holiday (Memorial Day) . 
June 4 — Elementary Schools close. 
June 11 — High School graduation. 
June 18 — High School closes. 

No School Signal — Time 7:00 a.m. (all schools) 

Acton Center, West Acton, and South Acton 2-2-2-2 blasts. 

Special Signal — Time 11:45 a.m. (Grades 1-6) 

All Precincts 2-2-2-2 blasts. 



STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until 
they are 5 years, 8 months of age on or before September 1, 
except in the case of those children 5 years, 6 months of age on 
September 1, whose mental age and physical condition are sat- 
isfactory. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first two 
weeks of school. All children entering for the first time must 
present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be S^A hours in the ele- 
mentary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with sufficient 
recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to pupils 
except by the principals or persons delegated by the principals. 



—151— 

3. School Busses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they attend are entitled to bus transportation.. Bus pupils 
must meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct 
themselves properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They must 
present a written excuse signed b}'^ parent or guardian for each 
absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a 
longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Section 15. 

"A child from a household where a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious 
or contagious disease, or from a household exposed to contag- 
ion from any such disease in another household, shall not at- 
tend any public school during such illness or exposure until 
the teacher of the school has been furnished with a certificate 
from the local board of health, school phj^sician or from the 
attending physician, stating that danger of convejang such dis- 
ease by such child has passed." 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them 
by the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any form 
of school property. 

8. Fire Drill 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the 
elementary schools and at least once a month in the high 
school. 



—152— 

TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
As of January 1, 1942 



Clayton E. Craig, Prin. 
Helen Appleby 
Ruth Berglind 



Center School 

App. Graduate of 

1941 Keene Normal School 
1936 Lesley Normal School 
1935 Lesley Normal School 



Hovie Address 

South Acton 
Concord 

South Acton 



Julia McCarthy, Prin. 
Florence Merriam 
Carolyn Tuttle, B.S.E. 
Louisa Wood, B.S.E. 



South School 

1906 Fitchburg Normal 

1927 Fitchburg Normal 

1940 Fitchburg State College 

1941 Hyannis State College 



South Acton 
South Acton 
South Acton 
Actor Center 



Robert L. Perry, Prin., 

B.S.E. 
Grace Callahan, B.S.E. 
Alice Feehan, B.S.E. 



West School 

Bridgewater State College Newtonviile 
1941 

1935 Fitchburg State College West Acton 
1938 Fitchburg State College South Acton 



Richard B. Greenman, 

Prin., A.B., Ed.M. 
Walter Holt, Asst. Prin. 

B.S., M.A. 
Rebecca Bartlett, B.S.E. 
Margaret Boornazian 
Cecelia Callahan, B.S.E. 
Ruth Eynon, B.S.E. 
Robert Harris, A.B. 
Henry Hopkinson, L.L.B. 
Marjorie Jones, B.S. 
Kalervo Kansanniva, 

B.S.E. 
John Mitchell, B.S.E. 
Marion Towne, A.B. 
Roger Walsh, Ph.B., 

Ed.M. 



High School 



1935 Harvard University 



1928 
1939 
1929 
1938 
1941 
1940 
1930 
1931 

1938 
1939 
1921 



West Acton 



Dartmouth College East Acton 
Framingham State College Worcester 

Burdett College Methuen 

Fitchburg State College West Acton 

Salem State College Lynn 

Harvard University Acton Center 

Northeastern Law West Acton 

Simmons College South Acton 



Fitchburg State College 
Fitchburg State College 
Smith College 



1941 Boston College 



West Acton 

Worcester 

Concord 

Allston 



Rita O'Donnell, B.S.E. 
Constance Russo 
Charles K. Yeremian 



Supervisors 

1942 B. U. Sargent School Dorchester 

1941 School of Practical Art Waltham 

1941 Longy School of Music Watertown 



—153— 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Voters of Acton: 

The school committee herewith submits its report with 
that of the superintendent for the year 1941. We believe that 
education is one of the greatest advantages of this great 
democracy. 

Two committee members resigned during the year, Mr. 
Montague, and Mrs. Howe, the chairman. Their offices were 
filled by Mr. Schmitz and Mr. Robert Hall, the committee 
being unanimous in its approval of these candidates. 

We wish to thank the voters and the special building com- 
mittee for their help in obtaining the much needed addition to 
the high school. 

Our budget for 1942 necessarily calls for an increase. We 
are planning to meet the exact needs of each department of the 
budget and expect to do the same in the future. This will mean 
a fluctuating budget from year to year as the needs in the de- 
partments change. 

We are asking more for salaries so that we can pay teachers 
an amount equivalent to that which they would receive in 
other towns similar to ours. 

The cost of stationery and supplies has increased about 
25/'- and textbook prices are higher. We use more fuel with 
the new addition to the high school, and so an increase in these 
items is necessary. 

Because of the lack of funds last year we were not able to 
paint and repair the school in South Acton. This work must be 
done this year. 

The committee requests that you appropriate the sum of 
$52,500 for the ensuing year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD A. LOWDEN, 

Chairman. 



-154— 



Comparison of Cost for Operating Acton Schools 

Mass. School Fund 1941 1940 1939 1938 

Part I $4,110.00 $3,820.00 $4,030.00 $4,066.00 

State and City Wards 95 0.46 986.59 869.58 796.38 

$5,060.46 $4,806.59 $4,899.58 $4,862.38 

Out-of-town tuition n, 168.46 1,628.14 1,863.01 2,498.19 

$6,228.92 $6,434.73 $6,762.59 $7,360.57 

Expended from Approp 47,369.01 46,883.36 47,071.61 47,098.63 

Net cost to town ^ $41,140.09 $40,448.63 $40.309.02 $39.738.06 

Appropriation 47,375.00 47,000.00 47,000.00 47.100.00 

Special Appropriation 3.000.00 
Transferred from Reserve 150.00 

$47,150.00 

■Approximate amount. Any discrepancy between this amount and that 
in treasurer's report is due to the fact that only money received for 
tuition for the year 1941 is included here. 

ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Proposed Budget for 1942 

1941 1942 

2. Supt. of Schools and General 

Expenses $2,500.00 $2,500.00 

3. Supervisors (3) 1,700.00 2,403.03 

4. Principals 

High 1,000.00 1,000.01 

Elementary 3,800.00 4,100.00 

5. Teachers 

High 15,400.00 17,900.03 

Elementary 7,500.00 7,800.00 

6. Textbooks 700.00 800.00 

7. Stationery and Misc. Supplies 1,200.00 1,500.03 

8. Wages of Janitors 3,550.00 3,840.00 

9. Fuel 1,800.00 2,180.00 

10. Janitors' Supplies and Power 950.00 1,200.00 

11. Repairs 1,150.00 1,300.00 

12. Libraries 50.00 55.00 

13. Health 300.00 300.00 

14. Transportation 5,037.50 5.000.00 

15. Sundries 112.50 125.00 

16 and 17. Vocational Education . 250.00 500.00 

$47,000.00 $52,500.00 



—155— 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR SUPPORT FOR 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1941 



Salary and Expenses of Superintendent $2,144.81 

Expenses of Instruction 

Salaries of Teachers, Supervisors, and Principals: 
Supervisors $1,650.00 

Principal of High School 791.61 

Principal of Elementary Schools 3,680.00 

High School Teachers 15,455.44 

Elementary Teachers 6,999.00 

$28,576.05 



High School Textbooks S394.30 

Elementary Textbooks 498.89 

High School Stationery and Supplies 1,232.77 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies 463.50 



$2,589.46 



Expenses of Operation 

High School: 

Wages of Janitor $1,350.00 



Fuel 






677.98 
787.32 




Miscellaneous 










South 

DT $776.00 

315.49 

181.36 




$2,815.30 

Total 

$2,248.00 

919.12 

479.83 


Elementary: 

Wages of Janit( 

Fuel 

Miscellaneous 


West 

$776.00 

401.48 

160.11 


Center 

$696.00 

202.15 

138.36 


High School 


$1,272.85 $1,337.59 
Maintenance and Repairs 


$1,036.51 
> 


$3,646.95 
$1,325.40 


Elementary: 











South West Center 

$80.56 $470.84 $97.36 



648.76 



Total Maintenance and Repairs $1,974.16 



—156— 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health $263.92 

Libraries 47.68 

Transportation 5,000.00 

Vocational Education 183.11 

Miscellaneous 127.57 

$5,622.28 

Total Expended $47,369.01 

Unexpended Balance 5.99 



Appropriation $47,375.00 

PAID FOR SUPPORT FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1941 



Superintendent, Salary and Travelling Expenses $1,780.09 

Secretary 122.72 

Office Expenses: 

Bostitch Boston Inc., staples $2.65 

Walter Campbell, drawing 20.00 

John Enneguess, envelopes .64 

J. L. Hammett Co., envelopes 3.43 

Richard Greenman, petty cash advance 15.00 

Leonard Godfrey, attendance officer . 40.00 

Walter Hall, petty cash advance 15.00 

Frank Johnson, elementary record cards 2.12 

Noble & Noble, vocational books 3.52 

Katherine Kinsley, census 35.00 

Murphy & Snyder, record cards 26.90 

News-Enterprise 1.50 

J. S. Moore 5.75 

Post Office, envelopes 39.17 

Samuel's, pictures 6.00 

Wright & Potter, account blanks 6.17 

Yawman & Erbe, file cabinet 19.15 

$242.00 

Total General Control $2,144.81 



—157— 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisor's Salary, Drawing $525.00 

Supervisor's Salary, Music 570.00 

Supervisor's Salary, Physical Education . . 555.00 

$1,650.00 

Principal's Salary, High School 791.61 

High School Teachers' Salaries: 

Rebecca Bartlett $1,070.00 

Margaret Boornazian 1,500.00 

Elinor Brown 660.00 

Cecelia Callanan 400.00 

Ruth Eynon 400.00 

Richard Greenman 90.00 

Robert Harris 1,397.00 

Walter Holt 1,960.00 

Henry Hopkinson 1,700.00 

Marjorie Jones 1,245.44 

Kalervo Kansanniva 1,120.00 

John Mitchell 1,260.00 

Eleanor Thompson 605.00 

Marion Towne 1,500.00 

Roger Walsh 480.00 

Mrs. M. F. Marble, substitute 28.00 

Louise Price, substitute 5.00 

Marion Quimby, substitute 35.00 

$15,455.44 

Principals' Salaries, Elementary: 

Ruth Berghnd $400.00 

Clayton Craig 480.00 

Theodore Ehrhardt 720.00 

Kalervo Kansanniva 240.00 

Julia McCarthy 1,400.00 

Robert Perry 440.00 

$3,680.00 

Elementary Teachers' Salaries: 

Helen Appleby $920.00 

Ruth Berglind 620.00 

Cecelia Callanan 540.00 



—158— 

Grace Callanan 1,015.00 

Alice Feehan 882.00 

Jennie Gleason 425.00 

Florence Merriam 1,250.00 

Carolyn Tuttle 820.00 

Louisa Wood 518.00 

Mrs. Clayton Craig, substitute 4.00 

Anna Macone, substitute 5.00 



High School Textbooks 

American Book Company $27.41 

Allyn & Bacon 5.49 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc 2.96 

M. Barrows & Co 2.28 

Dura Binding Co 45.55 

Dodd, Mead & Co 2.54 

D. C. Heath & Co 63.60 

Gregg Publishing Co 12.71 

Funk & Wagnalls 16.11 

Ginn & Co 62.54 

Harcourt, Brace & Co .78 

Houghton Mifflin Co 1.37 

International Textbook Co 16.08 

J. B. Lippincott 7.66 

Manual Arts Press 3.77 

McCormick-Mathers Co 11.98 

Noble & Noble .80 

Rand McNally Co 51.07 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 21.90 

D. Van Nostrand Co 2.05 

Macmillan Co 10.38 

Prentice-Hall, Inc 14.10 

Silver, Burdett Co 1.92 

South- Western Pub. Co 7.54 

John Wiley & Sons 1.71 



$6,999.00 



$394.30 



—159— 

Elementary Textbooks 

Allyn & Bacon $5.27 

American Book Co 34.86 

Arlo Publishing Co 3.06 

D. C. Heath Co 5.58 

Dura Binding Co 45.56 

Ginn & Co 47.49 

Harper & Bros 1.70 

Houghton, Mifflin Co 30.01 

Iroquois Pub. Co 17.82 

Little, Brown & Co 6.65 

John C. Winston Co 26.36 

Junior Literary Guild 1.27 

Harcourt, Brace & Co 2.88 

Macmillan Co 49.71 

Chas. E. Merrill .73 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 2.87 

Noble & Noble 20.33 

Scott, Foresman & Co 188.57 

Silver, Burdett Co 8.17 

High School Stationery and Supplies 

A. B. Dick Co., stencils $25.73 

Athletic Trainer's Supply, phys. ed. ma- 
terial 8.27 
Acton Athletic Assoc, due on basketball 26.48 

ATS Co., athletic letters 5.26 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 45.67 

Boston Music Co 1.25 

Brodhead-Garrett Co., Ind. Arts 66.49 

Chicago Apparatus Co., lab. supplies 1.88 

Central Scientific Co., lab. supplies 30.43 

Denholm & McKay, dish towels 5.00 

Fitchburg Hardware, Ind. Arts 13.58 

Edward E. Babb & Co., paper supplies . . 63.29 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper supplies 70.68 

George T. Blake, Ind. Arts 2 40 



$498.89 



—160— 

Central Electrical Supply Co., Ind. Arts 3.10 

J. F. McGuinness, Ind. Arts 3.10 

M. E. Manning, maps 7.00 

Milton Bradley Co., drawing supplies .... 102.06 

Murphy & Snyder 4.25 

Lull & Hartford, baseball material 39.40 

National Educ. Assoc, charts 1.72 

Remington Rand, Inc> 154.00 

Royal Typewriter Co 154.00 

Sawyer's, Ind. Arts 1.40 

South- Western Publishing Co., type work- 
books 14.02 

Schoolcrafters, paper, supplies 89.28 

Henry S. Wolkins, paper, supplies 50.65 
Science Research Assoc, occupational 

outlines 27.25 

Sears, Roebuck Co., hectograph, motor . 15.60 

Taylor Instrument Co., charts 5.07 

Underwood Typewriter Co 154.00 

Waite Hardware, Ind. Arts 10.26 

Priscilla Cleansing Co 30.20 



Elementary Stationery and Supplies 

Ruth Berglind, hectograph material ... $2.74 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc., paper, supplies 68.27 

Gledhill Bros., paper, supplies 32.63 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper, supplies 71.80 

Houghton Mifflin Co., charts, spellers . . 2.32 

Laidlaw Bros., workbooks 5.10 

McCormick-Mathers Co 9.87 

Milton Bradley Co., drawing supplies 142.41 

National Education Assoc .44 

Henry S. Wolkins, paper, supplies 50.66 

Russell Sage Foundation, pamphlet 1.63 

Schoolcrafters, paper, supplies 75.63 



$1,232.77 



$463.50 



—161— 

High School Operating Expense 

Daniel MacDougall, Janitor $1,350.00 

Fuel 677.98 

Miscellaneous: 

American Brush Co., mops, floor brushes $24.86 

A. W. Davis Co., shovels, nails, paint, 

glue, etc 

A. P. W. Paper Co., toilet paper towels . 

Boston Edison Co. 

Edward E. Babb & Co., thermometers, 
blatters 

C. B. Dolge Co., oil, colorock 

Haymarket Hardware, fire extinguisher 

A. C. Gilbert, ashes 

Laffin's Garage, gas, oil 

Joe Gallant 

William Horner, drain solvent, soap . . . 

Masury- Young, soap 

N. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 

Porter-Cable Machine Corp 

Standard Cotton Goods Co 

Strong's Market, ammonia, spray 

Cypras Kazokas, removal of rubbish . . 

Parker Hardware, locks, keys 

New Idea, overalls 

West and South Water Supply 

$787.32 

Total High School Operating Expense $2,815.30 

Elementary Operating Expense 

South West Center Total 

Janitors $776.00 $776.00 $696.00 $2,248.00 

Fuel 315.49 401.48 202.15 919.12 

Miscellaneous: 

Boston Edison Co $58.01 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 28.06 

Wilham Horner 4.93 

Standard Cotton Goods . 3.38 



31.10 


49.00 


394.62 


14.93 


19.02 


6.50 


7.00 


7.50 


32.00 


14.75 


9.86 


81.61 


10.32 


10.13 


4.66 


10.00 


15.81 


2.98 


40.67 



$45.26 


$24.69 


28.21 


29.51 


4.91 


4.91 


3.37 


3.37 



-162- 



Strong's Market 4.85 

West and South Water 

Supply 17.52 

Masury- Young 3.29 

American Brush Co 8.29 

A. P. W. Paper Co. 17.00 

A. W. Davis Co., paint, 

glass V 

C. B. Dolge Co 4.59 

Edward E. Babb & Co. .73 

J. S. Moore, pails 9.66 

Parker Hardware, bolts 2.06 
Haymarket Hardware, 

fire extinguisher 
Bursaw Gas & Oil Co. 
Benj. Saw^yer, glass 10.00 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., 
• weights 6.44 

Ralph Piper 7.40 

Mrs. Joe. DeSouza 2.00 

R. J. Rodday, chair braces 
N. Livermore 



14.98 


16.30 


3.28 


3.28 


8.29 


8.28 


16.00 


16.00 


12.65 


5.15 


4.58 


4.58 


.73 


.73 


1.50 




6.50 




3.00 


4.50 



13.06 
4.00 



$181.36 $160.11 $138.36 $479.83 
Total Elementary Operating Expense $3,646.95 



High School Maintenance and Repairs 

Allen Chair Corp $6.00 

Avery & Murphy, bell, keys 1.25 

American Floor Surfacing Machine Co., 

sander, discs 60.01 

Boston Typewriter Co., repairs 15.75 

Gledhill Bros 15.30 

Denholm & McKay, curtain rods 1.09 

Boston Staminite 17.50 

International Bus. Machines Corp., clocks 51.00 

Arthur L. Freese 57.65 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Inc., shades 113.53 



—163— 

E. H. Sheldon Co., lab. sinks 46.55 

Harold Day, map repairs 3.50 
Frank E. Fitts Manuf. and Supply Co., 

mats 31.70 

International Engineering Works, locker 

plates 5.29 

Samuel Knowlton, painting 91.75 

Irvine Astwood, smoke pipe 30.00 

B. A. King, electrical 11.53 

W. A. Freeman 23.97 

Maynard Machine Co., sharpen lawn 

mower 4.00 

Ralph Rogers, phonograph 2.00 

Taylor Instrument Co., lab. clock 3.61 

Waite Hardware, Ind. Arts 118.25 

West Disinfecting Co., filpor, paint 34.85 
Mass. Reformatory, audit, and Ind. Arts 

chairs 46.73 

Middlesex Laundry .30 

J. T. Newcomb Co., knob spindles 1.13 

Parker Hardware, bell, keys 14.57 

Wm. P. Proctor Co., glass, nails, Ind. Arts 36.34 

Walter Goss, tune piano 9.00 

Wolverine Brass Works, spring 1.40 

Niagara Machine & Tool Works, Ind. Arts 116.90 

Byron L. Moore, wall, roof, heating 266.70 

P. A. Dolan Co., radiator 10.00 

George Rifford, valve discs 2.50 

James Wilkinson & Company 73.75 

$1,325.40 

Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 

South West Center Total 
Reformatory for Women, 

flags 3.47 3.47 3.47 
J. S. Moore, pail, black- 
boards 5.55 

Wm. P. Proctor Co 4.93 49.85 8.64 

Avery & Murphy, bell . 1.25 



164- 



George Reed, fertilizer 3.74 

B. A. King, electrical 3.13 

Benjamin Sawyer, black- 
boards 27.30 

Irvine Astwood, furnace 29.69 

A. W. Davis Co., spring, 
glass 

W. A. Freeman r . . 

W. B. Holt, pipe 

Henry Thatcher, porch 

George Janvrin 

Paul E. Dutelle Co., roof . 

Leonard Godfrey 

Ruth Berglind, curtain . . 

Samuel Knowlton, Painting 

Maynard Supply, socket 

David Lawson 

So. Acton Woolen Co., 
cinders 1.50 

Ralph Rogers 



3.73 
2.15 



7.66 

3.60 
2.03 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
374.00 
18.85 



3.73 



.60 



8.75 



2.42 

43.00 

3.40 

3.20 



20.15 



$80.56 $470.84 $97.36 

Total Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health: 

Dr. Ernest Mayell, examinations in high 

and elementary schools $250.00 

Beardsell Dry Cleaning 1.30 

Middlesex Laundry 12.62 

Libraries: 

Civic Education Service, library maga- 
zines 4.20 

Gaylord Bros., library cards 7.30 

G. P. Putnam's Sons 2.08 

Herman Goldberger Agency, magazines 32.90 

School Publications, library magazine 1.20 



$648.76 



$263.92 



$47.68 



—165— 



Transportation: 



Ormal Laffin $5,000.00 

Vocational Education: 

Middlesex County, Tuition of Thomas 
Mitchell $63.71 

City of Waltham, Tuition of Calvin Hol- 
lowell, Horace Butler, Lincoln Soares, 
Allen Jensen, Harry Scribner 119.40 

$183.1i 

Miscellaneous: 

A B & C Transportation Company $1.22 

Ayer Motor Express .30 

Boston and Maine R. R .85 

Commissioner of Public Safety, boiler 

inspection 5.00 

C. C. Cullinane 10.10 

Denholm & McKay, diploma ribbons . 8.50 
Dewick & Flanders, Inc., transportation 

bond 37.50 
H. V. Church, National Honor Society 

pins 10.00 

Murphy & Snyder, graduation tickets, 

programs 10.50 

Pierce's Express .50 

Raynard's Express 1.75 

Tackney's Express .50 

Vannah Lithograph Co 40.85 

$127.57 

Total Expended $47,369.01 

Unexpended Balance 5.99 

Appropriation $47,375.00 



—166— 
REPORT OF THE SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT 



To the School Committee 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit my first annual report as Superintendent 
of Schools for the year. ending December 31, 1941. 

In March, 1941, Mrs. Hazel O. Bundy and Mr. Waiter B. 
Stevens were elected to succeed Mrs. Otis Reed and Mr. Sam- 
uel Knowlton. Mrs. Leland Howe was elected Chairman, and 
the Superintendent was elected Clerk, of the School Committee. 
Because Mr. Everett Montague and Mrs. Leland Howe changed 
their residence, Mr. Edward Schmitz and Mr. Robert C. Hall 
were appointed to serve until the next regular town election. 
Mr. Lowden was elected chairman to succeed Mrs. Howe. 

Teachers 

The following teachers terminated their service with the 
Acton School Department on or after the close of school in 
June, 1941: Mr. Theodore Ehrhardt (military service), Miss 
Elinor Brown (resigned to accept a position in Plymouth) , 
Miss Elynor Thompson (to be married) , Mr. John Moran (re- 
signed to accept a position in Adams), Mr. Frank Braman 
(change of employment) , Miss Arlene Hanson (to be married) , 
and Mr. Robert Perry (called by naval reserve) . 

The following teachers were transferred in the Acton 
School Department: Mr. Greenman to be superintendent, Mr. 
Holt to be assistant principal, Mr. Kansanniva to teach Social 
Studies in the high school, Miss Cecelia Callanan to teach 
junior high school subjects. Miss Tuttle to teach Grades 5 and 6 
in the South School, and Miss Wood to teach remedial work. 
Because of an increased enrollment, Miss Callanan became an 
additional teacher in the high school. 

The following teachers were engaged to serve in the Acton 
School Department in or after September, 1941: Miss Ruth 
Eynon, Commercial subjects; Mr. Clayton E. Craig, Principal of 
Center School; Mr. Robert L. Perry, Principal of West School; 



— 167-- 

Miss Constance Russo, Art Supervisor; Mr. Charles Yeremian, 
Music Supervisor; Miss Rita O'Donnell, Physical Education Su- 
pervisor; Mr. Roger T. Walsh, English and Coaching; and Mr. 
Ralph B. Hayes, Principal of West School. He is a graduate of 
Castleton, Vermont, Normal School, and a teaching principal 
with eight years of experience. 

Mr. Ehrhardt and Mr. Perry are both on leave of absence 
because of military service. 

The prospects for teacher turnover before the end of the 
school year 1941-1942 continue, for Miss Appleby has resigned 
and two of the men may be in military service. With a turn- 
over of ten or eleven teachers, over one-third of our staff, the 
need is clear for increasing salaries enough to attract and re- 
tain strong teachers. Minimum and maximum salaries for men 
and women, with annual increments, should be set up, the 
minimium depending on training and experience. An unofficial 
schedule, representing only a general policy, is suggested: 
S850-$l,350 for women and $1,000-$1,500 for principals in the 
elementary schools; and $1,100-$1,600 for women and $1,300- 
Sl,800 for men in the high school. 

Enrollment 

The enrollment increased from 501 on October 1, 1940, to 
529 on October 1, 1941, of which 247 were in the high school and 
282 were in the elementary schools. A considerable number of 
students enter and leave during the year. In the fall five boys 
left to enter the W^altham Trade School. With new families 
moving to Acton for permanent residence, a slight increase m 
enrollment may be expected. 

Finances 

Economy was practiced in several ways by omitting the 
testing program, the use of educational films, and the painting 
of the South School. Most of the allotment for elementary 
repairs went for a rear gutter, long needed, at the West School. 
This work was done along with other projects to increase safety 
in the schools, as recommended by the chief of the fire depart- 
ment. 

Although an adequate amount is set aside for normal 



—168— 

maintenance, emergency outlays must be expected for such 
items as the following: flashing on high school skylights; defec- 
tive furnaces, water pipes and floors in the elementary schools; 
and painting the South School. The need continues for paint- 
ing corridors in the West School and for improvement of 
lighting in all schools by the use of 150-watt bulbs. 

An increase is requested this year primarily to retain and 
attract strong teachers, 'if the town is to maintain good schools. 
It is the wish of every parent to secure for each child the best 
possible education, and this can be achieved only when teach- 
ers remain to build up a strong educational system and morale. 

Elementary Education 

The elementary schools continue to stress the funda- 
mentals, with special emphasis on reading. Under considera- 
tion is a single new English text to replace a variety of texts 
now in use, so that ail students entering high school may have 
the same training. Miss Louisa Wood has been doing excellent 
remedial work, at one time spending a day and one-half in each 
building each w^eek, but later resuming the plan for a remedial 
class in the South School, with pupils coming from other 
schools when transportation is possible. One child confined to 
her home on account of rheumatic fever is taught twice a week 
by Miss Wood. 

Secondary Education 

In order to strengthen the high school training, all students 
are required to take at least four prepared subjects daily and 
the points required for graduation are increased from 114 to 
120. This program is easily within the reach of an average stu- 
dent. 

High School Addition 

Reports from several teachers follow, showing the benefits 
of the high school addition. 
Typewriting Department: 

The new arrangement for the typewriting department 
has greatly increased its efficiency. The anteroom makes it 
possible for students who have missed work because of ab- 
sence to make it up during any of their free periods. Mimeo- 



—169— 

graph work for the school office and various organizations of 
the town is also done here without complete disruption of 
classes, as has been necessary heretofore. The six new ma- 
chines make it possible for more students to take typewriting. 

Home Economics Department: 

The work of the home economics department has been 
improved this year by the addition of a sewing room apart from 
the foods laboratory. This has eliminated the crowded work- 
ing area for the girls in their foods work, particularly during 
the lunch preparation period. With less confusion in the room 
it is easier to clean up after lunch. 

In the clothing classes there has also been a marked im- 
provement. New chairs and tables have given more comfort- 
able and suitable seating for sewing work. The benefit of this 
is apparent in the general improvement in the quality of work 
and in time required to complete a project. 

The prices of foods in the lunch room were raised in order 
to give the students the same quality and quantity as in the 
past. There has been some criticism of this rise in price, but 
the small balance shown in the financial report below shows 
the need for the increase. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1941 $19.52 

Total Sales for 1941 1,762.83 

Total expense for 1941 1,771.32 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1942 11.03 



$1,782.35 $1,782.35 

Industrial Arts Department: 

Mr. Mitchell's report shows the modern trend toward a 
general shop program in schools like ours. 

"Briefly, the changes resulting from our increased shop 
facilities are as follows: 

First: The physical set-up of the shop or laboratory, as 
it is now called, is divided in unit areas of work, such as 
wood, both machine and hand; metals, sheet, bench, foundry, 
and machine lathe operation; electrical, both house and bell 
wiring; ceramics, chiefly cement; finishing; planning and 



—no- 
drawing. There are approximately 52 working stations which 
are adequate for a class of 20 boys or girls. Each unit area has 
its own tool panels or cabinets, thus eliminating a wasteful 
amount of walking. The planning and drawing center has 
been added because of the need for quiet, for freedom from 
dust, and for a suitable room to do the planning, reading, 
and drawing necessary in the process of making any article. 
The ceiling of the laboratory is sound deadened to prevent 
disturbing noises from permeating the building. 

Second: The working equipment has been increased by 
the addition of a circular saw and jointer for woodworking; 
roll former, for rolling sheet metals and wire into cylindrical 
shapes; combination rotary machine used for burring, turning 
wire edges, crimping and beading sheet metals; stake plate 
holder and stakes used in sheet metal work. More emphasis 
is being placed on metal because of the need for instruction 
along this line. A few hand tools for use in wood and metal 
were also added. Drawing benches for use in the planning 
center were made to meet the need for proper drawing facilities. 
Arm chairs with writing tablets were also added to make writ- 
ing and sketching easier. 

Third: The courses have been rearranged so that boys 
in the 7th grade receive a general course in drawing, wood- 
work, and metal; in the 8th grade, drawing, woodwork, metal 
work, and electricity. In the 9th grade, the course is general 
mechanical drawing and home mechanics. In the high school 
grades, shop subjects are elective, boys being able to choose 
a definite type of work in which they are interested. Projects 
made in the 7th and 8th grades are chosen because of their 
instructional, practical, and aesthetic values; however, freedom 
in the selection of projects in later years is left to the individual 
himself. Required of all, nevertheless, is a working drawing 
and bill of material, which give the boy or girl an opportunity 
to perform each step in making an article from the first draw- 
ing to the final product. 

It is not enough that a student make an article; a well 
educated person knows not only the "what" of his subject, but 



—171— 

also the "whys," "hows," and "wherefores." Thus, along with 
the making of an article, related information, occupational 
surveys, and consumer knowledge are integrated. It is well to 
note here that industrial arts education and vocational education 
do not mean one and the same thing. The former is a part of 
general education as are English and mathematics, and it is nec- 
essary for the making of a well-educated individual; the latter, 
however, is specialized training in one's future life work. This 
has no place in the program of general education; its place is 
in the program of trade or vocational education. 

In connection with course and class arrangements the fol- 
lowing has been inaugurated this year and is proving highly 
successful. Each class now has its own shop period or periods. 
No longer are there three grades mixed together as in previous 
years, a condition which prevented effective instruction. 

Class shop organization has been assigned to responsible 
individuals who are known as shop superintendents and fore- 
men. This type of organization known as "pupil per- 
sonnel" is most widely used and develops responsibility, 
co-operation, good work habits, and proper shop attitude and 
conduct. The plan has not been too successful, however, 
because of the lack of proper student leadership. 

Fourth: The mechanical drawing branch of Industrial 
Arts has been improved with the new drawing room. The type 
of work produced is proof that a need has been answered. The 
types of drawing being taught are general mechanical drawing, 
architectural drafting, machine drafting, and aeronautical 
drafting. Though the number of students electing the latter 
type of drafting are few now, the future outlook is much bet- 
ter. 

One observation, though not encouraging, must be made. 
Boys are not totally appreciative of the opportunities which 
are available to them. The attitude that they must be paid 
for doing that which they are sent to school to do, must be 
broken down. Efforts to break this attitude are proving most 
difficult unless full co-operation is obtained from parents of 
the students." 



—172— 



Health 

Health services in the schools are at a high standard because 
of the vigilance of Doctor Mayell and Mrs. Creeley, and because 
of co-operation on the part of the teachers and parents. Milk 
is bought or given (328 quarts in 1941) in the elementary 
schools, thanks to several local organizations. 

Doctor McNally held his dental clinic as usual last year and 
will return in February, 1942. The financial report for 1941 



Expenditures 

April 1, 1941, Dr. 

McNally $100.00 

May 12, Dr. Mc- 
Nally 50.00 

Sept. 12, Dr. Mc- 
Nally 91.25 

Jan. 1, 1942, Balance 

on hand 24.41 



follows: 




Receipts 




Jan. 1,1941. Cash on 




hand 


$5.01 


Jan. 3, P. T. A., play 


102.00 


During year, money 




paid by parents . 


158.65 



$265.66 



$265.66 



Physical Education 

The report of Miss O'Donnell follows: 

"The importance of physical education in the schools is 
more than ever recognized in times of national emergency. 
The efficiency of our men and women depends on sound physi- 
cal development, a result which can be achieved only by an 
adequate and consistent program of physical education through 
the schools. 

The physical education program for the lower grades 
comprises marching, exercises, mimetics, story plays and 
games adapted to the grades. The fundamental aims are the 
development of good posture, muscular co-ordination and 
imagination. In the high school the two periods a week are 
devoted to marching tactics, exercises, dancing, and the de- 
velopment of the technical skills used in the various sports. 
The sports program varies with the season and includes field 
hockey, basketball, volley ball, baseball, and hiking. 



—173— 

- Besides the practical activity, theoretical instruction is 
given on health habits, life saving, and first aid. 

A schedule of inter-school basketball is arranged for high 
school pupils; participation in these competitive games is an 
incentive to pupils to develop skillful techniques, team play, 
and good sportsmanship. 

Some suggestions include: 

1. Compulsory uniforms for all class work, allowing sufficient 
time for parents to procure these. 

2. Athletic uniforms to be purchased by the A. A. for girls' 
field hockey and basketball teams, those to remain the 
property of the A. A. 

3. Point system to be established for the awarding of school 
emblems. 

4. Extra curricular activities to include group skating and 
other winter sports." 

Mr. Walsh, an experienced coach and performer in sev- 
eral sports, has renewed interest in six-man football and 
basketball. The boys have responded with enthusiasm and 
already have performed with credit. 



Acton High School Athletic Association — 1941 



Receipts 

Cash on hand, Jan- 

1, 1941 $36.13 

Bus receipts 81.68 

Gate receipts 74.60 

Dog show receipts 8.86 

Magazine receipts 152.11 

Candy receipts .... 41.97 

Dances 81.26 

A. A. dues 74.93 

Miscellaneous 27.55 



$579.09 



Expenditures 

SuppHes $90.05 

Transportation . . 148.50 

Referees 107.00 

Cleansing 10.05 

Tax 9.33 

Miscellaneous 15.57 

Cash on hand, Jan. 

1, 1942 198.59 



$579.09 



—174— 

Art and Music 

In art Miss Russo is developing a general course. Freedom 
of expression is emphasized in the elementary grades as funda- 
mentals of line, form, and color are taught, the chief topics 
being animals, action figures, design, and appreciation of art. 
The object here is expression of the child, for without it he 
would not enjoy the beauty in his surroundings. 

In the high school free expression is again the guiding 
principle. Pupils receive full instruction on the fundamentals 
of line, form, and color, including design, figure sketching, 
lettering, interior decorating, fashion drawing, plants, per- 
spective, history of art, and appreciation of surroundings. 

Mr. Yeremian reports good progress in music: 

1. A course of study for Grades 1-12 is being developed to in- 
sure uniform training in the entire school system including 
vocal music, theory, instrumental music, and music appre- 
ciation. 

2. The high school now has an orchestra of over 20 students 
and it is still growing. Through the P. T. A. music fund the 
school now owns two tympani, a trombone, several violins, 
toy symphony instruments for each elementary school, and 
another piano for the West School. 

3. Our music department is in urgent need of textbooks and 
music. 

4. The morale in all music groups is improving, thanks to the 
co-operation of parents and members of the school organ- 
ization. 

P. T. A. 
Several projects sponsored by the Parent-Teacher Associ- 
ation have been of great benefit to the pupils. Hot lunches are 
served at the town hall to Center School children, weekly 
dancing classes are held in the high school, the grand piano is 
being reconditioned, and over $275, raised by a newspaper col- 
lection is being spent for orchestral instruments. Mrs. Henry 
Engman, president, has continued the good work of this or- 
ganization and has seen the membership increase to more than 
225 paid members. 



—175— 

Guidance 

To help students select their careers a series of talks by 
representatives of various colleges and business schools was 
arranged, and several vocational films were shown. Mechanical 
aptitude tests were given in the high school to interest boys in 
defense industries. The school office enabled a number of girls 
to secure summer employment. A $50 scholarship, offered by 
the Acton Center Woman's Club, was awarded to Anne Hag- 
garty, who entered Salem Teachers College; and Priscilla 
Gleason received a $100 scholarship from the New England 
Conservatory of Music. 

Conclusion 

I. If our schools are to render better service to the town, two 
fundamental problems should receive attention: 

1. The budget should be flexible enough to provide sal- 
aries that will attract and hold strong teachers. 

2. The co-operation of all parents is needed in matters of 
discipline to insure morale, particularly in the high 
school. If difficulties should arise, parents are urged, 
before drawing a conclusion, to consult the teachers 
and principals. 

II. The past year has been marked by many adjustments in 
the school department, some brought about by the high 
school addition, and others by changes in the committee 
and staff. Through this period, the superintendent has 
appreciated the co-operation of parents, teachers, and 
janitors and the excellent support of the committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD B. GREENMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



—176— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Richard B. Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report as school physician. 

The yearly physical examinations of all the pupils in the 
schools was complete in October. 

The diphtheria immunization cHnic was held in May and 
the pre-school clinic was conducted in June. 

In March we had some cases of measles in the West and 
South Schools, and in the Center School we had two cases of 
scarlet fever in November; but by prompt isolation and quaran- 
tine we were able to control the disease. 

At a joint meeting of the superintendents and school physi- 
cians of Middlesex County held at Concord in November, the 
reasons for so many rejections in the selective service draft 
were discussed, and I feel that the concensus of the medical 
men was that the cause of some of these conditions occurred 
after the school age. 

A detailed report of the results of the physical examina- 
tions will be found in the nurse's report. 

We appreciate the improvements made in the nurse's room 
at the high school. 

Again I wish to thank the superintendent, teachers, nurse, 
and the townspeople for their co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



. —177— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Richard B. Greeman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as school nurse. It 
has been my desire to prevent illness among the school popula- 
tion through the promotion of good health habits and health 
consciousness on the part of pupils. Seasonal colds and ill- 
nesses do interrupt school attendance and have been unus- 
ually severe this winter. 

The schedule for school visits remains the same as last 
year, the high school at 9 a.m. and the elementary schools from 
1-2 p.m. Absences are checked and any child who may be ill 
is taken home. The visits to the elementary schools may not 
always adhere to schedule as it often seems advisable to com- 
bine a school visit with a sick call in the same vicinity, thus 
saving time and mileage. When there has been a case of com- 
municable disease, the school physician examines pupils in 
their classes as frequently as necessary, thus effectively con- 
trolling the spread. Doctor Mayell gave all pupils a physical 
examination in the fall, advising parents by card of any serious 
defects discovered. 

Although I feel that school health has been improved, 
much remains to be done, especialh^ as regards care of teeth. 
The School Dental Clinic cannot include high school pupils in 
its schedule because there is not time. The dentist feels that 
his time is best devoted to the pupils of the lower grades. The 
high school pupils have been urged to see a dentist at least 
once a year. In many instances very little work is needed to 
keep the teeth in good condition. The school dentist has not 
yet made his annual visit, but is expected in the early spring. 
The State Department of Health has offered to make a survey 
of our dental needs. Recommendations made by this survey 



—178— 

will help us to develop the type of dental clinic best suited to 
our pupils. 

Vision tests were given to all .pupils by the teachers and 
re-tests were made when necessary. A new test of vision, 
which exposes defects that the older type Snellen test has 
failed to show, is being considered. 

The importance of our Diphtheria Clinic was emphasized 
this year. A case of diphtheria made mothers unusually anx- 
ious to have the protective treatment given to their children. 
Nursing services in the schools include first aid, simple dress- 
ings, and assistance to the school physician and the school 
dentist. I would ask parents to be aware of the possibility of 
a contagious disease when children are ill, thus avoiding ex- 
posure of others. 

My work for the year is as follows: 

Pupil inspections 1892 

Simple dressings 471 

First aid 22 

Pupils taken home ill 39 

Pupils taken to clinic 26 

Home visits 211 

I wish to express my appreciation to you and to the teach- 
ers for your support in this school health program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GENEVIEVE J. CREELEY, R. N. 



—179— 

Acton High School 
GRADUATION PROGRAM 

Friday, June 13, 1941 

High School Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. 

ENTRANCE MARCH OF SENIORS 

Priests' March Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Leonard A. Godfrey 
INVOCATION 

The Reverend Lynne P. Townsend 
SALUTATORY 

Doris M. Towne 
ESSAY— These Things Called Books 

Anne M. Haggarty 
CHORUS OF SENIOR CLASS 

To Thee, O Country Julius Eichherg 

ESSAY— The Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Earle C. Harriman 
PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT 

Betty Marble 
Vice-President of the Senior Class 
ESSAY— The Lighthouse at Minot's Ledge 

Dorothy E. Bond 
VALEDICTORY 

Anne M. Haggarty 
CLASS SONG 

Music: Priscilla Gleason 
Words: Raymond Reynolds 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Supt. Richard B. Greenman 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

Mrs. Leland F. Howe 
FINALE MARCH 

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar 

RECEPTION TO GRADUATES IN SCIENCE ROOM 



—ISO- 



Graduates of 1941 



Phyllis Irene Aldred 
James Milton Andersen 
Dorothy Elaine Bond 
Henry Francis Bulette 
Victor Clapp 
Vera May Cunningham 
Charles Judd Farley, Jr. 
Priscilla Jeanne Gleason 
'Anne Marie Haggarty 
Earle Chester Harriman 
Donald Reynolds Howard 
Shirley Eileen Kelley 
■Hazel Lucy Knight 
Eleanor Louise Larrabee 
Betty Louise Marble 
* Honor Students 



Howard William Love joy 
Herbert William Merriam, Jr. 
Olga Locke Nelson 
Mabel Jeanne Ogilvie 
Esther Marie Petersen 

* Esther Pinolehto 
Marjorie Faye Reed 
Raymond Aquilla Reynolds 
Gordon Alan Smith 

J. Henry Thatchc" 

* Doris May Towne 
Robert Lynne Townsend 
Betty-Jeanne Tubbs 
Meltha Elizabeth Walther 

*Margaret Whitcomb 



Awards During Year: 

Esther Pinolehto and Earle Harriman: American Legion 
Awards for best rank in Scholarship, Loyalty, and Achieve- 
ment (Edwards-Quimby Post) . 

Doris Towne: Washington-Franklin Medal for best records 
in American History (Massachusetts Society, Sons of the 
American Revolution.) 



INDEX 

Assessors 59 

Board of Health 82 

Cemetery Commissioners 52 

Dog Officer 80 

Elizabeth White Fund 80 

Finance Committee 7 

Fire Department 91 

Forest Warden 90 

Inspector of Animals 79 

Middlesex County Extension Service 61 

Moth Control 54 

Sealer's Report 62 

Selectmen's Report 16 

Schools: 

Budget for 1942 154 

Graduation Program 179 

Organization 149 

School Committee 153 

School Nurse 177 

School Physician 176 

Special Building Committee 51 

Summary of Expenses, 1941 155 

Superintendent 166 

Teachers 152 

Special Town Meeting (Abstract), Dec. 29, 1941 30 

Superintendent of Streets 56 



Index — Continued 

Librarian's Report 66 

Eocks Added to Public Library 67 

Tax Collector 85 

Town Accountant 109 

Balance Sheet, Dec. 31, 1941 144 

Town Clerk's Report 32 

Births 33 

Marriages 36 

Deaths 40 

Non-Resident Burials 41 

Dog Licenses 43 

Jury List (Revised) 1941 47 

Town Forest Committee 58 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 10, 1941 18 

Town Nurse 81 

Town Officers 11 

Treasurer's Report 96 

Tree Warden 55 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 60 

Police 63 

Public Welfare 92 

Warrant, Monday, March 2, 1942 3 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 65 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Official Boards 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1942 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1942 



STOUGHTON PRINTING COMPANY 
Stoughton, Mass. 



-3— 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said town of 
Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the transaction 
of town affairs, to meet in their respective precincts, to wit : 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the first day of March, 1943, by 
posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each of the 
places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at least 
before the first day of March, to bring in their votes on one 
ballot for the following town officers: 

Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of taxes. 



— 4— 

one selectman for three years; one assessor for three years; 
one member of the board of public welfare for three years; 
one member of the board of public welfare for two years ; four 
constables for one year; one cemetery commissioner for three 
years ; two members of the school committee for three years ; 
one member of the scl^ool committee for one year ; one member 
of the board of health for three years; one member of the 
board of health for one year; one trustee Memorial Library 
for three years, and a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 8 
o'clock p.m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Common- 
wealth to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, as 
aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall in said Acton, on Monday, 
the eighth day of March, at 7 :30 o'clock P.M., then and there 
to act on the following articles : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the sev- 
eral reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and deter- 
mine how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 



— 5— 

financial year beginning January 1, 1943, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priote the sum of ^200.00 for the use of the Treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The town will be re- 
imbursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $100.00 for the maintenance of Jones Com- 
munity Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$500.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will adopt Section 38A, 
Chapter 41, General Laws relative to Town Collector or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the use of the Town Forest 
Committee or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to defray the cost of collection 
and disposal of garbage throughout the town or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money sufficient to insure the com- 
pressed air tanks and steam boilers of the three fire stations 
or act anything thereon. 



— 6— 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the expenses of the Rationing 
Board or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will accept Section lOOA, 
Chapter 41, General Laws relative to indemnification of 
officers or employees 'for damages, etc., incurred on account 
of injuries arising out of their operation of publicly owned 
motor vehicles, or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time of 
said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the 
time of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this twenty-seventh day 
of January, 1943. 

W. BURTON HARVEY, 
ARTHUR W. LEE, 
GEORGE A. MORSE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
A true copy. Attest: 

ROBERT G. WILLETT, 

Constable of Acton. 



— 7— 



Town Officers 



Moderator 
Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

W. Burton Harvey Term expires 1943 

George A. Morse Term expires 1944 

Arthur W. Lee Term expires 1945 

Town Clerk 
Harlan E. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 
William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Carl C. Flint Term expires 1943 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1944 

Clare A. Milbery Term expires 1945 

Collector of Taxes 
Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 
James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1943 

Raymond L. Hatch Term expires 1944 

*Burton B. Bursaw Term expires 1945 

**Benjamin J. Ineson 

*Resigned **Elected to replace* 



* 



-8- 



Constables 
Samuel E. Knowlton Robert G. Willeti 

Ivar Peterson Norman L. Perkins 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Horace F. Tuttle . , Term expires 1943 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1944 

Ray L. Harris Term expires 1945 

School Committee 

Fannie E. Davis Term expires 1943 

Edward A. Schmitz Term expires 1943 

Hazel O. Bundy Term expires 1944 

Walter B. Stevens ... Term expires 1944 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1945 

Robert C. Hall Term expires 1945 

**Margaret Eraser 

*Resigned **Elected to replace* 

Trustees of Memorial Lihranj 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1943 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1944 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1945 

Board of Health 

O. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1943 

*Lillian E. Taylor Term expires 1944 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1945 

**Henry K. Doyle 

^Resigned **Elected to replace* 

Agent of Board of Health 
Ernest E. Allsopp 

Tritstees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1943 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1944 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1945 



— 9- 



Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1943 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1944 

IL Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1945 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1943 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1944 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1945 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1943 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1944 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1945 



Appointments Made by Selectmen- — 1942 

Executive Clerk 

Virginia Milbery 

Office : Town Hall Hours : 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30; 

Board of Public Welfare, Tuesday evenings at 7:00. 

Finance Committee 
W. Stuart Allen Henry E. Tolman 

Alden C. Flagg Albert W. Locke 

William T. Merriam Porter G. Jenks 

Superintendent of Streets 
William C. Kazokas 

Toivn Accountant 
Howard L. Jones Term expires 1944 



—10— 

Registrars of Voters 

James W. Coughlin Term expires 1943 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1944 

William B. Feely Term expires 1945 

Harlan E. Tuttle Ex-Officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — Alice C. Duren 
Clerk — James A. Wayne 
^ Inspector — Samuel E. Knowlton 
Inspector — Paul A. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — Marie S. Whouley 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — Ralph L. Rogers 
Deputy Inspector — Leo T. McCarthy 
Teller — Louisa N. Wood 
Teller— Mary L. FitzGibbon 

Precinct II 
Warden — Clarence Robbins 
Clerk — Grace J. Cull inane 
Inspector — Merle M. Hayward 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — David Clayton 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas M. Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Henry L. Capelle 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph H. Lemoine 
Teller — Pauline Bursaw 
Teller — John J. Bradley 

Precinct III 
Warden — Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Charles A. Byron 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Katherine M. Kinsley 



—11— 

Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk — Albert C. Gravlin 
Deputy Inspector — Harry E. Holt 
Deputy Inspector — Mary Laffin 
Teller — Margaret F. Leveroni 
Teller— Marion C. Reed 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 
Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 
H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 
Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Carl E. Anderson 

Toivn Forest Committee 

Albert R. Jenks Term expires 1943 

Clarence E'rost Term expires 1944 

James J. Knight Term expires 1945 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 
Bertram D. Hall Charles E. Smith 

Field Drivers 

Norman E. Livermore Robert G. Willett 

Norman L. Perkins 



-12- 



Swperintendent of Moth Work 
James J. Knight 



Police Officers 
* Michael Foley, Chief 
Norman L. Perkins • 

Robert G. Willett 
* Civil Service — Permanent 



Lawrence Roche 



Burial Agent 
Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 
Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 
Ralph Jones 

Workmen's Compefisation Agent 
Howard L. Jones 



William Braman 
A. W. Davis 
M. B. Ferber 
Philip Newell 
Willard Houghton 
W. H. Soar 
Peter Olsen, Jr. 
Gerald Davis 
Charles Clark 



Public Weighers 

Alfred Davis, Jr. 
G. Howard Reed 
W. H. Francis Davis 
Thomas Hearon 
Fred Stone 
Albert S. Braman 
Harold Whitney 
William Kane 
Edward Hellier 
John William Davis 



■13- 



Selectmen's Report 



Herewith, v/e submit the reports of the various depart- 
ments of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1942; 
also a report of the action taken on all articles submitted to 
the voters at the regular and special town meetings. 

Nineteen hundred forty-two was the first full year after 
this country entered the present world war. Problem.s arising 
out of the support of the war effort, organizing for local 
defense, co-operating with governmental agencies and corre- 
lating the life of the town to the national emergency, has 
multiplied by many times, both the work and responsibilities 
of the Board. 

We wish to thank the members of the Acton Committee 
on Public Safety for the efficient manner in which they have 
assumed much of the added responsibility. Especially do we 
wush to thank the members and staff of Rationing Board 
No. 41 for the forthright and equitable handling of its most 
important but sometimes unpleasant task. It has rendered a 
public service of the highest order. 

In carrying out the wishes of the voters as expressed in 
the regular and special town meetings, we purchased a new 
police cruiser with two-way radio equipment and installed an 
efficient heating plant in the town hall. We purchased the 
power grader now in use on the streets of the town, but due 
to priorities, have as yet been unable to complete the purchase 
of the new fire truck authorized by act of the voters. The 
board is still negotiating with government agencies in regard 
to this purchase. 

Due to the fact that the Legislature did not make the 
necessary appropriations for new road construction under 



—14— 

Chapter 90, no work under this chapter has been done during 
the year. 

We wish to express our appreciation to all the regular 
town officers and committees for the faithful discharge of 
their duties and responsibilities during the year and to the 
citizens of the town whose response to the war emergency 
and its problems has carried the town successfully through a 
most trying year. 

W. BURTON HARVEY, 
ARTHUR W. LEE, 
GEORGE A. MORSE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



—15- 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town 
Meeting, March 9, 1942 



Art. 1. To choose all necessry town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose Waldo E. Whitcomb trustee of the Elizabeth White 
Fund for three years. 

Chose H. Stuart MacGregor trustee of the West Acton 
Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Clarence Frost trustee of the Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Charlotte Conant trustee of the Goodnow Fund 
for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
thousand dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Selectmen 
be three hundred dollars per annum and the other members 
two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salaries of the Assessors be nine hun- 
dred dollars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned 
as they may determine. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk fifteen 
dollars and the other member ten dollars per annum. 



—16— 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board of 
Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars per 
annum and that of the other members seventy-five dollars 
each per annum and that a member of the Board of Public 
Welfare shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assistance and 
that the expense of administering this assistance such as 
necessary supplies, salary and traveling expense of said 
supervisor shall not exceed the amount provided for this 
purpose by the Federal Government. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen 
dollars for the annual meeting and ten dollars for special 
meetings. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be five 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Accountant be five 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to fix the sal- 
aries of all other town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the several 
reports of the town officers. 

Voted : To accept the several reports of town officers. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

The committee appointed under Art. 25 of the warrant 
for the annual meeting, March 10, 1941, recommended no 
action be taken on a highway building due to war conditions. 

Art. 4. To see what sums of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and deter- 



—17— 

mine how the same shall be raised. 

Under this and other articles in the warrant it was voted 
to appropriate and raise by taxation for: 

Highways, Village $ 1,450.00 

Highways, Chapter 81 8,550.00 

Highways, Chapter 90 2,000.00 

General Government 7,200.00 

Bonds (town officers) 251.50 

Notes and Bonds 1,905.33 

Buildings and Grounds 2,000.00 

Police Department: 

Chief's Salary 1,800.00 

Assistant's Salary 1,550.00 

Operating expense for cruiser 450.00 

General expense 400.00 

Cruiser, Police Department, Article 16 1,500.00 

Fire Department 2,800.00 

Fire Department, Boots, Coats, Helmets 500.00 

Forest Fires 900.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department, for spraying only 1,000.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Health Department 1,200.00 

Town Nurse, Salary 2,000.00 

Town Nurse, Expenses 200.00 

Snow Removal, estimated 4,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,950.00 

Public Welfare 5,000.00 

State Aid 240.00 

Military- Aid 300.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 18,000.00 

Department of Education, Schools 52,000.00 

Insurance, High School 300.00 

Library, Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library, Books 200.00 



—18— 

Cemeteries 2,800.00 

Insurance Liability 800.00 

Memorial Day, Article 5 250.00 

Expense of Dog Officer 200.00 

Work Relief 200.00 

Redemption of Tax Titles 100.00 

Jones Athletic Field,' Article 18 300.00 

Unclassified 400.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 400.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 100.00 

Soldiers' Relief 1,600.00 

Middlesex County Hospital Maintenance, Art. 15 1,012.12 

New Seats, Town Hall, Article 9 250.00 

Transfer from Machinery Fund to Mach. Acct. 750.00 

From Overlay Surplus Account 2,000.00 



$140,261.95 



Acting on a motion to appropriate money for Buildings 
and Grounds — Voted : That the Parent Teachers Association 
be given the use of the Town Hall for school lunches from 
October 1, 1942 to April 1, 1943 without charge. 

Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred 
and fifty dollars for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the town 
treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning January 1, 1942, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General 
Laws. 

Voted unanimously: That the town treasurer, with the 



I 



—19— 

approval of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the rev- 
enue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1942, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred (200) dollars for the Work Relief Fund. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $230.00 for the use of the treasurer, to pay 
the expenses of the local dog officer. The town will be re- 
imbursed for the amount spent by the County of Middlesex, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred (200) dollars for the use of the treasurer, to pay the 
expenses of the local dog officer. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase additional seats for the 
Town Hall or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred and fifty (250) dollars for the purchase of additional 
seats for the Town Hall. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to continue the improvement of Main 
Street, from the Carlisle line to the State Road in East Acton ; 
said money to be used in conjunction with any money which 
may be allotted by the State or County, or both, for this 
purpose; or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 



—20— 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase and install directional 
signs or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 12. To see i£ the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of m.oney to purchase and install a new heating 
system in the Town Hall or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That a committee of three be appointed by the 
Moderator to investigate the need of a new heating system 
for the Town Hall and report at some later meeting. Com- 
mittee appointed by Moderator — Walter M. Cook, James Fitz- 
gerald and Ray L. Harris. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to insure the High School Building or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of ($300.00) 
three hundred dollars to pay for the insurance on the High 
School Building to be insured for the amount of ($20,000.00) 
twenty thousand dollars for the term of three years. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will accept as a town way or 
street, the laying out by the selectmen, of an extension of 
Maple Ave., westerly about 341 feet to the house of Charles H. 
Liebfried, as shown on a plan filed in the office of the town 
clerk. 

Voted : To accept as a town street, the laying out by the 
selectmen, of the extension of Maple Ave., westerly about 
341 feet to the house of Charles H. Liebfried, as shown on a 
plan filed in the office of the town clerk. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum sufficient to pay the County of Middlesex, as required 
by law, the town's share of the net cost of the care, mainte- 
nance, and repair of the Middlesex County Tuberculosis Hos- 



—21— 

pital, as assessed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
111 of the General Laws and Acts in amendment thereof and 
in addition thereto and including Chapter 400, Section 25 G 
(6) (a) of the Acts of 1936 or take any action in relation 
thereto. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one thou- 
sand twelve and 12/100 ($1,012.12) dollars to meet the 
assessment made on the town for the purpose mentioned in 
this article. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase a cruiser equipped with 
two-way radio for the police department or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of fifteen hun- 
dred ($1500.00) dollars to purchase a cruiser equipped with 
two-way radio for the police department. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will accept Section 1, Chap- 
ter 85, General Laws as amended relative to bicycle registra- 
tion. 

Voted : To accept Section 1, Chapter 84, General Laws 
as amended relative to bicycle registration. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00 for the maintenance of Jones Com- 
munity Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate three hunderd (300) 
dollars for the maintenance of Jones Community Field, South 
Acton. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of one hundred (100) dollars for the redemp- 
tion of tax titles held by the town. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one hundred 



—22— 

(100) dollars for the redemption of tax titles held by the 
town. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to transfer $750.00 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer seven hundred fifty (750) dollars 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to replace the present ladder truck in 
South Acton or act anything- thereon. 

The following motion was made: 

To raise and appropriate not more than $9,000.00 for the 
purpose of purchasing a ladder truck with the necessary 
equipment for the fire department and to meet said appropria- 
tion, that $1,000.00 be raised in the tax levy of the current 
year and that the treasurer with the approval of the selectmen 
be and hereby is authorized to borrow $8,000.00 and issue 
bonds or notes of the town therefor, payable in not more than 
five years in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

The committee, consisting of David J. Clayton, Lloyd 
Priest, Earl Hayward, Theron Lowden, George Morse and 
William Merriam, are hereby authorized to dispose of the old 
truck to what they consider the best advantage, by sale, turn- 
in toward the new truck or otherwise. 

Amendment that the sum of $2,500.00 be substituted for 
$9,000.00 did not prevail. 

Amendment that the sum of $6,500.00 be substituted for 
$9,000.00 did not prevail. 

The original motion did not prevail. 

Voted: That the article be referred to a committee of 
three to be appointed by the Moderator, to investigate the 



—23— 

matter, with instructions to report at a special town meeting 
within sixty days. Committee appointed by the Moderator — 
H. Stuart MacGregor, Lawrence Donnelly, George S. Braman. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to pay for fighting 
building fires and fix a price thereon. 

Voted : That the matter be left with the Selectmen. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will be responsible for acci- 
dents caused by fire apparatus operators and to what extent. 

Voted : That the Selectmen be authorized to consult legal 
counsel and to take such further action in the matter as they 
may determine. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Special Town 
Meeting, May 4, 1942 

Art. 1. To hear and act upon the report of the committee 
appointed by the moderator to consider Article 12 of the 
annual town meeting, pertaining to a heating system in the 
Town Hall and see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for same or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To take up Article 6 in conjuction with Article 1. 

Voted: That the report of the committee on installing 
a heating system in the Town Hall be accepted. 

Voted Unanimously: To raise and appropriate the sum 
of twenty-five hundred dollars ($2500.00) for the purpose of 
installing a new heating system in the Town Hall. That the 
Selectmen with the committee on heating be instructed to 
install a boiler large enough to heat the library at some future 
date. 



—24— 

Art. 2. To hear and act upon the report of the committee 
appointed by the moderator to consider Article 21 of the 
annual town meeting, pertaining to the replacement of the 
ladder truck in South Acton and see if the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money for same or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To accept the report of the committee on the 
replacement of a ladder truck in South Acton. 

Voted Unanimously: That there be appropriated the 
sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000.00) to replace the ladder 
truck at Precinct 2 and to meet the said appropriation there 
be raised in the tax levy of 1942 the sum of one thousand 
dollars ($1,000.00) and that the treasurer with the approval 
of the selectmen be authorized to borrow the sum of three 
thousand dollars ($3,000.00) and to issue notes therefor pay- 
able in accordance with Chapter 44, General Laws; so that 
the whole loan shall be paid in not more than three years; 
that the purchase of said truck be left to the Board of Select- 
men and the Fire Engineers of the town, also that the Select- 
men be authorized to dispose of any unnecessary equipment. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the report of the town 
counsel to consider Article 23 of the annual town meeting, 
pertaining to the responsibility for accidents caused by fire 
apparatus operators. 

The report of the town counsel was read by the chairman 
of the Selectmen and accepted. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be instructed to insert an 
article in the w^arrant of the next annual town meeting per- 
taining to Chapter 41, Section lOOA. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to increase the salary of the Chief 
of Police and that of the assistant, at the rate of $200.00 each 
per annum or act anything thereon. 



—25— 

Motion : To raise and appropriate the sum of $400, to 
increase the salary of the Chief of Police and that of the 
assistant at the rate of $200.00 each per annum. Did not 
prevail. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to erect and maintain an observation 
tower, for the purpose of spotting and reporting aeroplanes, 
as an aid to defense, in co-operation with the Army Air Corps 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of $400.00 
for the erection of an observation tower. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to connect the heating system of the 
Memorial Library to the heating system of the Town Hall or 
act anything thereon. 

Action taken under Article 1. 

On Motion, Voted to adjourn. 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Special Town 
Meeting, November 23, 1942 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to transfer a sum of 
money not exceeding $2,700.00 from the surplus revenue fund 
for the purchase of the power grader now rented by the town 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : That the sum of $2,700.00 be transferred from 
the surplus revenue fund for the purchase of the power grader 
now rented by the town. 

Voted to adjourn. 



—26— 



State Election, November 3, 1942 



D. — Democratic ' C. — Communist 

R. — Republican S. P. — Socialist Party 

S. L. P. — Socialist Labor Party P. — Prohibition 

Prct 1 Prct 2 Prct 3 Ttl 

Whole number of ballots cast 346 334 372 1052 

Goveiifior 

Roger L. Putnam— D 59 70 75 204 

Leverett Saltonstall— R 282 258 291 831 

Henning A. Blomen— S. L. P 1 1 

Otis A. Hood— C 2 2 

Joseph Massida— S. P 

Guy S. Williams— P 

William McMaster 4 4 

Blanks 5 4 1 10 

Lieutenant Governor 

Horace T. Cahill— R 287 258 301 846 

John C. Carr— D 49 70 62 181 

Walter S. Hutchins— S. P 1 1 2 

George L. McGlynn— S. L. P 1 1 

E. Frank Searle— P 3 3 

Blanks 9 6 4 19 

Secretary 

Joseph J. Buckley— D 45 67 58 170 

Frederic W. Cook— R . 289 254 304 847 

Bernard G. Kelly— S. L. P 2 1 2 5 

Abbie L. Tebbets— P 2 2 4 

Peter Wartiainen, Jr.— S. P 

Blanks 8 12 6 26 



—27— 

Prctl Prct2 Prct 3 Ttl 
Treasurer 

Laurence Curtis— R. 274 244 

Francis X. Hurley— D 58 75 

Martha E. Geer— P 1 

Gote Elvel Palmquist— S. L. P 1 

Anders H. Swenson— S. P 2 

Blanks 13 12 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley— D 63 79 

Russell A. Wood— R 270 239 

Herbert Crabtree— S. L. P 1 

Ethel J. Prince— P 1 

Blanks 12 15 

Attorney General 

James E. Agnew — D 37 58 

Robert T. Bushnell— R 297 263 

Charles F. Danforth— P 1 

Fred E. Oelcher— S. L. P 1 

Howard Penley— S. P 

Blanks 10 13 

Senator in Congress 

Joseph E. Casey— D 51 82 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.~R 288 245 

Horace L Hillis— S. L. P 1 1 

George L. Paine— S. P 

George L. Thompson — P 

One War ballot, Pet. 2 

Blanks 6 7 5 18 

Congressman 

Edith Nourse Rogers— R 315 302 345 962 

One War Ballot, Pet. 2 

Blanks 31 33 27 91 



283 


801 


76 


209 


2 


3 


1 


2 


1 


3 


9 


34 


69 


211 


287 


796 


1 


2 


2 


3 


13 


40 


43 


138 


314 


874 


3 


4 


1 


2 








11 


34 


69 


202 


297 


830 


1 


3 















—28— 

Prct 1 Prct 2 Prct 3 Ttl 
Councillor 

Frank A. Brooks— R 296 257 310 863 

William F. A. Graham— D 32 58 44 134 

Blanks 18 19 18 55 

k 

Senator 

Louis B. Connors— D 76 93 99 268 

Richard I. Furbush— R 255 225 259 739 

Blanks 15 16 14 45 

Representatives in General Court 

John H. Valentine— R 301 274 333 908 

Blanks 45 60 39 144 

District Attorney 

Robert F. Bradford— R 305 266 315 886 

Joseph R. Corish— D 27 50 39 116 

Blanks 14 18 18 50 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

Loring P. Jordan— R 281 239 295 815 

William F. McCarty— D 42 67 51 160 

Blanks 23 28 26 77 

County Commissioner 

Thomas B. Brennan— D 52 74 68 194 

Charles C. Warren— R 276 237 282 795 

Blanks 18 23 22 63 

County Treasurer 

Charles P. Howard— R 305 271 328 904 

Blanks 41 63 44 148 

Question No. 1. Laiv Proposed by Initiative Petition — Birth 
Control. 

Yes 190 137 183 5i0 

No 88 118 125 331 

Blanks 68 79 64 211 



—29— 

Prct 1 Prct 2 Prct 3 Ttl 



Alcoholic Beverages — Question No. 1. 
Shall licenses be granted in this 
town for the sale therein of all alco- 
holic beverages (Whisky, rum, gin, 
malt beverages, wines and all other 
alcoholic beverages.) 

Yes 103 

No 208 

Blanks 35 

Alcoholic Beverages — Question No. 2. 
Shall licenses be granted in this 
town for the sale therein of wines 
and malt beverages (wines and beer, 
ale and all other malt beverages.) 

Yes 108 

No 189 

Blanks 49 

Alcoholic Beverages — Question No. 3. 
Shall licenses be granted in this 
town for the sale therein of all alco- 
holic beverages in packages, so 
called, not to be drunk on the prem- 
ises. 

Yes 117 

No 186 

Blanks 43 

Pari-Mutuel — (Horse) 

Shall the pari-mutuel system of 

betting on licensed horse races be 

permitted in this County? 

Yes 135 

No 162 

Blanks 49 



129 


132 


364 


162 


218 


588 


43 


22 


100 



144 


116 


368 


140 


231 


560 


50 


25 


124 



144 


138 


399 


137 


207 


530 


53 


27 


123 



151 


135 


421 


126 


178 


466 


57 


59 


165 



130 


117 


351 


126 


184 


478 


78 


71 


223 



—30— 

Prct 1 Prct 2 Prct 3 Ttl 
Pair-Mutuel — (Dog) 

Shall the pari-mutuel system of 
betting on licensed dog races be per- 
mitted in this County? 

Yes 104 

No 168 

Blanks 74 

Question of Public Policy. 

''Shall the Representative in the 
General Court from this district be 
instructed to vote to request the 
President and Congress to call at 
the earliest possible moment a con- 
vention of Representatives of all 
free peoples, to frame a Federal 
Constitution under which they may 
unite in a Democratic World Gov- 
ernment?" 

Yes 153 160 180 493 

No 61 45 66 172 

Blanks 132 129 126 387 



-31— 



Schedule of votes cast for Representative in General Court, 
11th Middlesex District — November 3, 19^2 



o 2 -^ 
^ *a xj o 

< ^O O H > H 

John H. Valentine 

of Chelmsford 908 197 2290 368 827 4590 

Blanks 144 41 381 82 282 930 

Total 1052 238 2671 450 1109 5520 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, Town Clerk of Acton 
RUTH C. WILKINS, Town Clerk of Carlisle 
HAROLD C. PETTERSON, Town Clerk of Chelmsford 
GEORGE R. ROBESON, Town Clerk of Tyngsboro 
CHARLES L. HILDRETH, Town Clerk of Westford 



—32- 



Town Clerk's Report 



Births 

Whole number recorded 55 

Born in Acton 1 Native parentage 47 

Males 38 Foreign parentage 2 

Females 17 Mixed parentage 6 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 35 

Residents of Acton .... 39 Residents of other places 31 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 26 

Residents of Acton 25 Residents of other places 1 

Occurring in Acton .... 12 Occurring in other places 14 

Average age in years, 56 plus 



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-40- 



Deaths Registered in 1942 



Date 


Name 


Yrs. 


Mos. 


Dijs. 


Oct. 


2 


Anderson, Otto 


73 




— 


June 


6 


Bondelevitch, Walter E. 


62 


10 


3 


Jan. 


18 


Burdick, Stephen E. 




— 


3 


Sept. 


7 


Cole, Thomas Wallace 


72 


4 


28 


Aug. 


29 


Conquest, John Frederick 


1 


10 


— 


July 


22 


Gomes, Fernando 


60 


— 


— 


Mar. 


15 


Goodearl, William Thomas 


74 


9 


25 


July 


1 


Hill, Janet D. 


1 


4 


21 


Oct. 


17 


Johnson, James Joseph 


66 


4 


28 


Jan. 


6 


Jones, Lillie M. 


65 


4 


21 


Oct. 


26 


Jones, Walter 


72 


8 


9 


Dec. 


27 


Leavitt, Mary C. 


6 


6 


18 


June 


19 


Morrison, Robert Boyd 


73 


6 


7 


Sept. 


18 


Parlin, Anna U. (Johannson) 


80 


— 


— 


Mar. 


18 


Reed, George H. 


88 


4 


16 


July 


17 


Richardson, Jonathan Davis 


86 


7 


26 


Feb. 


2 


Sanborn, Everett Russell 


60 


1 


2 


Feb. 


17 


Schoedel, Adrian Collison 


32 


8 


5 


July 


5 


Smith, Martha Fletcher 


74 


9 


22 


April 


2 


Tuttle, George H. 


76 


1 


15 


Feb. 


27 


Tuttle, Idella Josephine 


72 


9 


17 


Mar. 


14 


Wamboldt, Mary R. (Beach) 


86 


4 


5 


Dec. 


16 


Whittier, Frank 0. 


80 


4 


15 


April 


16 


Woodcock, George Abra 


59 




29 



—41— 









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-48- 



Dog Licenses 



276 Licenses at $2.00 $552.00 

I 50 Licenses at $5.00 250.00 

' 1 License at $50.00 50.00 

$852.00 

Deduct fees 327 Licenses at 20 cents 65.40 

Paid to Town Treasurer $786.60 

Notice 
All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the owners 
or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of time of year ownership is acquired. No tax bills 
are sent to owners of dogs. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



-44- 



Jury List Revised — 1942 



Precinct 1 
Norman E. Livermore — Cen. Main St. 
Charles H. Liebfried — Maple Ave. 
Kenneth E. Jewell — Woodbury Lane 
Iner Peterson — Maple Ave. 
Clarence Frost — Newtown Rd. 
James W. Coughlin — Cen. Main St. 
George E. Horton, Jr. — Cen. Main St. 
Forrest E. Bean — Cen. Main St. 
Warren J. Davis — Great Rd. 

Precinct 2 
Arthur Eraser — Massachusetts Ave. 
George K. Hayward — Main St. 
Wesley P. Wilmot— Liberty St. 
Richard Lowden — Main St. 
James J. Knight — School St. 
Timothy J. Hennessey — Prospect St. 
Ralph W. Piper — Piper Rd. 
Otis J. Reed — Prospect St. 
Ralph H. Littlefield— Main St. 

Precinct 3 
Charles A. Byron — Arlington St. 
Everett B. Coolidge — Windsor Ave. 
Orla E. Nichols— Central St. 
Waklo J. Flint— Church St. 
Louis A. Flerra — Central St. 
Warren L. Davis — Massachusetts Ave. 
Ernest G. Banks — Massachusetts Ave. 
A. Leslie Harris — Arlington St. 
Lester A. Sebastian — Massachusetts Ave. 



-45- 



Report of Cemetery Commissioners 
For the Year 1942 



We have endeavored another year to maintain the high 
standard of the past in the care of our cemeteries. 

In both Woodlawn and Mt. Hope several beds of shrub- 
bery have been set out in different parts of the cemeteries, 
also quite a number of young trees. 

The account of the town treasurer shows that during the 
past year the cemetery department has received and paid into 
the treasury $1293.20, itemized as follows: — 

Sale of lots and graves $173.00 

Annual care of lots 658.20 

Burials 390.00 

Lowering device 63.00 

Foundation 3.00 

Refund on a steel drum 6.00 



$1,293.20 



We ask that these receipts may be considered in making 
your appropriation for the current year. 

We recommend an appropriation for the care of the ceme- 
teries of $2800.00 

An itemized account of the expenditures for the care of 
the cemeteries will be found in the report of the town ac- 
countant. 

We have prepared a schedule of the receipts and expendi- 
tures on account of each lot in perpetual care, in books kept 



-46- 



for that purpose, which may be examined by persons inter- 
ested. 



HARRY E. HOLT, 
RAY L. HARRIS, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



Report of the Sealer of Weights and Measures 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my report as Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the year ending December 31, 1942. 

During the year I sealed 340 weighing and measuring 
devices, did not seal 11, and condemned 1. 

The State Department of Standards loaned equipment 
to check oil tank meter systems as in past years. The State 
also supplied special heavy truck testing equipment to test 
platform truck scales. 

Sealing Fees Collected , $68.49 

Fees Uncollected 1.00 

Paid Town Treasurer $68.49 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. ANDERSON, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



—47— 



Report of the Work of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service in Acton for the Year 1942 



The Extension Service program in Acton has covered all 
phases of agriculture and homemaking. 

The dairy farmers have been advised on growing more 
and better roughage — including alfalfa, alfalfa mixtures — 
pastures including Ladino Clover. A rotation system of graz- 
ing has also been developed. The Albert Jenks farm has been 
developing a system of rotation pastures and is cutting the 
Reed's Canary Grass for ensilage. Porter Jenks is a member 
of the County Dairy Committee. The Dairy Herd Improve- 
ment Association members include David F. Penney, Charles 
H. Liebfried and Porter A. Jenks. The Extension Service 
also assisted farmers of Acton in securing labor for both dairy 
and fruit farms. 

Acton poultrymen have been assisted in their production 
problems through farm visits and circular letters. The 
Middlesex County Poultry Association held five meetings at 
the Women's Club building. These meetings covered all phases 
of poultry production. 

The Home Department held a wide variety of meetings 
including Christmas foods and food preparation. Instruction 
was given on re-upholstering of furniture. This was carried 
out as a leaders' training meeting with a few members in the 
class and hoping that these members would carry it on to 
their neighbors. The women were also instructed on child 
development and family relationship. One of the most suc- 
cessful meetings of the year was in connection with outdoor 
cookery. 65 people attended the meeting to learn better ways 
of cooking meals in the outdoor fireplace. 



-48- 



147 boys and girls were enrolled in 4-H Club Work. 
These boys and girls were instructed in food, clothing, home 
furnishing, gardening, handicraft, and poultry. The clubs 
were under the supervision of the following leaders: Miss 
Ruth Berglind, Miss Grace Callanan, Mrs. Marjorie Flint, 
Mrs. C. I. Stearns, M'rs. Chas. Strack, Miss Caroline Tuttle, 
Mrs. Helen Quinn, Mrs. Kenneth Jewell, Mrs. Howard Bil- 
ling, Mr. Clayton Craig, and Ralph Hayes. Mrs. Warren 
Hartweil was chairman of the committe which sponsored 4-H 
Club Work in the town. Several prizes were presented to 4-H 
club members by the Acton Garden Club. 

Every farmer and home owner was encouraged to pro- 
duce more food for the war effort and to have a victory gar- 
den. Disease and insect control charts were sent to all farm- 
ers every month on vegetables and fruit crops. This enabled 
the farmers of Acton to produce one of the largest and clean- 
est crops on record. 



Report of Workmen's Compensation Agent 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen : 

During the past year there have been three accidents to 
the town employees. All of the accidents were of a minor 
nature and were taken care of by the insurance company in a 
satisfactory way. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 
Workmen's Compensation Agent. 



—49- 



Librarian's Report — 1942 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the Library, January 
1, 1942, 21,783. Increase by purchase, 293. Increase by gift, 
75. Duplicates placed in the Branches, 92. Total increase, 
460. Withdrawn from circulation, 477. Total number of vol- 
umes in the Library, January 1, 1943, 21,766. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was open ,102. 
Number of volumes circulated, 11,181. 
Largest daily circulation, 186 ; January 14. 
Smallest daily circulation, 18; November 11. 
Daily average circulation, 107 plus. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and paid 
to Town Treasurer, $30.25. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : U. S. Gov't, 2 ; State of Mass., 8 ; Town of Acton, 1 ; 
Rita O'Donnell, 23; W. Burton Harvey, 10; Mildred Pope 
Moore, 9 ; Eleanor Stevens, 5 ; George Roe, 3 ; Wilmot Taylor, 
3 ; Charlotte Conant, 2 ; Philip Goldthwait, 2 ; Alfred Jules. 1 ; 
Mrs. Fortesque, 1 ; DuPont Co., 1 ; Benjamin Rush, 1 ; Babai 
Society, 1 ; Sesquicentenial Committee, 1 ; Unknown donor, 1. 
Total 75. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian 



—50— 



Assessors Report — 1942 



Tax assessed as follows : 

Buildings, exclusive of land . . . $2,565,025.00 

Land 631,755.00 

Personal 411,515.00 

$3,608,295.00 

Valuation January 1, 1941 3,560,980.00 

Increase in valuation . 47,315.00 

Rate of Taxation, $28.40 

Real Estate $90,788.55 

Personal Estate 11,687.05 

Polls 1,928.00 

$104,403.60 

Amount of money raised : 

State Tax $9,300.00 

State Parks Tax 119.25 

Amount Returned Commonwealth 

Account Boston Edison Co. . . 378.61 

County Tax 4,893.18 

Tuberculosis Hosp. Assessment 1,012.12 

Town Grant 85,171.41 

Overlay 3,529.03 

$104,403.60 

Added Assessments: 

Polls 60.00 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise : 
Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1135 



—51— 

Total Value of Motor Vehicles 
and Trailers 

Rate of Excise, $36.46 

Total Excise 



$233,000.00 

$8,024.16 



ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
CLARE A. MILBERY, 
CARL C. FLINT, 

Board of Assessors. 



Report of the Inspector of Animals 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the year 1942 : 

Dogs quarantined 17 

Cats quarantined 1 

Rabies 

It was advised by the Livestock Disease Control not to 
make the annual barn inspection this year so as to save gas 
and tires. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST H. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



-52— 



Report of Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 



INVESTMENTS 

Warren Institution for Savings $1,465.54 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

$3,465.54 

RECEIPTS 

Warren Institution for Savings $29.45 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank 20.00 

City Institution for Savings 20.00 

$69.45 

PAYMENTS 

Harlan E. Tuttle, Treasurer of the 

Evangelical Church in Acton . . $49.45 

Town of Acton, care of lot in Woodlawn 

Cemetery 20.00 

$69.45 

CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



—53- 



Report of the Board of Health 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Health of Acton herewith submits the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1942. 

We are pleased to report that there has been no run of 
communicable diseases during .the year, only a few isolated 
cases, and these were kept within complete control. This 
record is especially gratifying as compared with last year, 
when there were over two hundred cases of measles treated 
and twelve cases of scarlet fver. 

The Board sponsored the diphtheria clinic again this 
year under the direction of the school doctor and nurse, Dr. 
E. A. Mayell and Genevieve Greeley, R. N., with the assistance 
of Dr. 0. L. Glark and Lillian Taylor, R. N. The number of 
children given the Schick test w^as sixty and the number of 
doses of Toxoid given was 92. The total number of pupils 
cared for was seventy, 12-pre-school, 58-school. We feel that 
this diphtheria clinic is one of the most important programs 
in the town and every parent should avail themselves of this 
opportunity. 

The town dump has been maintained for the exclusive 
use of the citizens and has been kept in an orderly condition, 
there being an attendant on duty the days it is open. This 
plan has worked out very well. 

On August 29 Genevieve Greeley, R. N., submitted her 
resignation as town and school nurse to accept a much better 
position, not only for the remuneration but to do a different 
type of work with greater responsibilities. Mrs. Greeley 
served the town for several years, faithfully and untiringly. 



—54— 

We were very fortunate in being able to engage Lillian 
Taylor, R. N., to fill the vacancy and to take up again the 
duties of tov^n and school nurse, she having served the tov^n 
in this capacity several years prior to Mrs. Greeley. 

While the maintenance of the town dump and the health 
expenses of the town are unpredictable yet we have kept well 
within the appropriation for 1942 and therefore we recom- 
mend an appropriation for 1943 of $1000. This is $200 less 
than last year and, except for some unexpected or unforeseen 
emergency, we believe this amount will be sufficient to carry 
on. 

Record of contagious diseases January 1, 1942, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1942: 

Dog-bite 14 

Cat-bite 1 

Mumps 2 

German Measles 23 

Influenza 4 

Deaths : 

Residents who died in other towns ... 12 

Total deaths recorded 24 

Residents of Acton 23 

Residents of other places 1 

Total burial permits issued 13 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOWELL H. CRAM, 

Secretary. 



Report of Town Nurse 



Board of Health, Acton Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report as Town Nurs3 since my 
appointment September 1st to December 31st : 

Bedside Nursing Calls ... 438 

Welfare 26 

Pre-natal 10 

Post-natal 26 

Social Service 6 

At the Middlesex County Hospital at Waltham 4 patients 
have been X-rayed and examined. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F, TAYLOR, R. N. 



-56— 



Welfare Department Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Gentlemen : 

We respectfully submit the report of the Welfare Board 
for 1942. 

We intend to make this as brief as possible, but long 
enough so the taxpayers will know how their tax money is 
being spent. 

The appropriation for Welfare for 1942 v/as $5000. We 
spent approximately $3700, leaving a balance of $1300. 
During 1942 we aided ten cases in town and eight cases out 
of town with Acton settlements. At the present time we 
have four cases on Welfare, one in Acton and three out of 
town. The out-of-town cases, over which we have no juris- 
diction except to pay the bills, will cost the Town of Acton 
in 1943 approximately $1330. The case in Acton will cost 
about $400, making a total of approximately $1730 which this 
town will spend for Welfare this coming year. This Board 
needs a reserve fund to take care of emergencies. Therefore, 
we recommend an appropriation of $2500, which is a 50% 
reduction over last year. 

In regard to Aid to Dependent Children, we have lost 
two-thirds of our case load, leaving only two families con- 
sisting of four persons. The appropriation last year was 
$2000, out of which we spent approximately $900. The two 
cases which are receiving this aid will cost about $360 for 
1943. Therefore, we recommend an appropriation of $500, a 
75% reduction. 



—57— 

We are asking for $21,000 for Old Age Assistance for the 
coming year. This is an increase of $3000 over last year's 
appropriation. Many recipients became eligible for increases 
on May 1, 1942, because of state legislation which raised the 
minimum amount of those receiving this assistance. In many 
cases, the local board does not favor the grants and increases 
of applicants, but laws, over which we have no control, make 
it possible for such aid to be given. During the past year, 
ninety-nine persons received Old Age Assistance. Out of this 
number, 74 had Acton settlements, and the remaining 25 were 
out-of-town settled. The present case load is 87. 

The Board' regrets the loss of Mr. Burton Bursaw, who 
has entered the armed service, but the town was indeed fortu- 
nate to secure so capable a man as his successor, Mr. Ben- 
jamin Ineson. 

Appropriations recommended for 1943: 

Old Age Assistance $21,000.00 

Temporary Aid '. . . 2,500.00 

Aid to Dependent Children . . 500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAYMOND L. HATCH, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



-58- 



Police Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report of the Police 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1942. 

Number of motor vehicle accidents reported 22 

Number of occupants killed in accidents 2 

Number of occupants injured 21 

Number of pedestrians injured 1 

A7Tests and Prosecutioyis Made on Following Complaints 

Drunkenness 11 

Assault and battery 6 

Operating under the influence of liquor 6 

Carrying a loaded revolver without a permit 1 

Larceny 3 

Law of road 2 

On default warrant 1 

Leaving scene of accident after causing injury to property 1 

Using a motor vehicle without authority 1 

Speeding 2 

Operating without a license 1 

Keeping an unlicensed dog 1 

Non-support 1 

Indecent assault 1 

Persons committed to Mental Hospitals 2 

Runaway boys picked up 3 

Inmates picked up and returned to Institutions 2 

Accidental deaths reported 1 

Accidental drownings reported 1 

Number of bicycle registrations issued 252 

The patrol car purchased for the department this year 



—59— 

has proved very satisfactory. The car can be used as an 
ambulance and is equipped with a stretcher, four blankets, a 
first aid kit and two-way radio. It has already been used sev- 
eral times as an ambulance and seven persons have been trans- 
ported to hospitals in it. 

The number of arrests and persons injured in accidents 
were much lower this year, due mostly to present conditions. 

We had one fatal accident in which two persons lost their 
lives. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



Report of Elizabeth White Fund 



The Trustees have signed orders to the Treasurer for 
two hundred seventy-five dollars ($275.00) for the year ending 
December 31, 1942. 

These orders have been given after careful investigation 
with the knowledge that each person is worthy of help from 
this trust fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO WHITCOMB, 
CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CLARA SAWYER, 

Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund. 



—60— 



Report of the Fire Department 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1942. 

The total number of alarms responded to by the entire 
department are as follows: 

Building 14 

Automobile 2 

Chimney 9 

False 1 

Out of Town 

Oil 

Miscellaneous I 

Total cost of extinguishing $535.53 

The ladder truck at South Acton has been condemned and 
has been taken out of service. An application for the new 
truck to replace this ladder truck has been sent to Washington 
six times and returned as many times refused. Nevertheless, 
a seventh application has gone in and it has not been heard 
from to date. I expect that by persistent effort we will even- 
tually be rewarded. 

The department is now fairly well equipped with new- 
hose and the men are well equipped with new coats, boots, 
helmets and badges. I feel that we will not have to spend 
any extra amount of money this year for equipment. 

I would like to see, as soon as possible, fire alarm boxes 
distributed throughout the town at danger points. These 
boxes are very important inasmuch as they would be there 
for use twenty-four hours a day, rain or shine. A person 



—61— 

simply pulls the lever and the box sends in the proper alarm. 
This process would eliminate loss of time through telephoning 
or making mistakes that result from excitement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Chief Fire Department. 



Forest Warden's Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Your Forest Vv^arden submits the report for the year 
ending December 31, 1942. 

Total number of fires responded to . . 31 

Out of town calls 

Labor cost of extinguishing .... $534.65 

The Forest Fire Patrol was put on this year for the first 
time during the heavy fire season. As there were less fires 
than usual during this particular period, I feel that the money 
spent in patrolling was a good insurance against property 
loss. 

The forest fire truck, hose and other equipment are in 
good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



—62— 



Report of Town Forest Committee 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The Acton Town Forest Committee herewith submits the 
following report for the year 1942. 

With no funds available, we have been unable to purchase 
additional land to add to our forest or to make improvement 
thinnings in our present forest. 

The present fuel situation, national shortage of lumber 
and inadequate transportation emphasizes the importance 
and value of local municipal forests. These can be managed 
so as to give annual crops of wood and lumber. Several 
municipal forests of sufficient size are now reporting annual 
profits. 

We again solicit the donation of cut over land or parcels 
of woodland to be added to our Town Forest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, 
CLARENCE FROST, 
JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Town Forest Committee. 



■63— 



Report of Tax Collector 



1940 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $9,889.80 

Interest 639.96 

$10,529.76 

Paid Treasurer . $10,321.02 

Abated 204.48 

Tax Titles 4.26 

$10,529.76 

1941 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $23,162.89 

Interest 415.17 

$23,578.06 

Paid Treasurer $14,913.68 

Abated = . 192.26 

Tax Titles 4.26 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 8,467.86 

$23,578.06 

1942 TOWN TAX 

Committed $90,788.54 

Interest 32.21 

$90,820.75 

Paid Treasurer $69,558.36 

Abated 1,284.39 



—64— 

Tax Titles 59.64 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 19,918.36 



1941 PERSONAL TAX 



1942 PERSONAL TAX 



$90,820.75 

1940 PERSONAL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $836.53 

Interest 55.52 



$892.05 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $864.36 

Abated 27.69 



$892.05 



Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $1,214.80 

Interest 12.74 

$1,227.54 
Or. 

Paid Treasurer $418.70 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 808.84 



$1,227.54 



Dr. 

Committed $11,687.06 

Interest 5.09 

$11,692.15 



—65— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $10,554.72 

Abated 32.66 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 1,104.77 

$11,692.15 

1940 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $72.00 

Interest 3.81 

Costs 9.10 

$84.91 
Or. 

Paid Treasurer $70.91 

Abated 14.00 

$84.91 

1941 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $304.00 

Interest 2.69 

Costs 17.85 

$324.54 
Or. 

Paid Treasurer $126.54 

Abated 138.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 $60.00 

$324.54 

1942 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

Committed $1,988.00 

Interest 24.85 

$2,012.85 



—66— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,462.85 

Abated 252.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 298.00 



$2,012.85 
1939 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $8.13 



$8.13 
Cr. 
Abated $8.13 



$8.13 
1940 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $195.75 

Interest $4.44 



$200.19 
Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $51.87 

Abated 122.12 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 26.20 



$200.19 
1941 EXCISE TAX 

Dr. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 $782.77 

Committed Jan. 15, 1942 714.58 

Interest 21.71 

$1,519.06 



—67— 

Cr. 

Paid Treasurer $1,213.21 

Abated 41.36 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 . 264.49 











$1,519.06 




1942 


EXCISE 


TAX 




Committed 




Dr. 




$8,024.16 


Interest 








4.01 














$8,028.17 


Paid Treasurer . , 
Abated 




Cr. 




$6,774.60 
52.04 


Uncollected Jan. 1, 


1943 , 






1,201.53 



$8,028.17 

SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
JANUARY 1, 1943 

Total Debits 

1940 Town Tax $10,529.76 

1941 Town Tax 23,578.06 

1942 Town Tax 90,820.75 

1940 Personal Tax 892.05 

1941 Personal Tax . , 1,227.54 

1942 Personal Tax 11,692.15 

1940 Poll Tax 84.91 

1941 Poll Tax 324.54 

1942 Poll Tax , 2,012.85 

1939 Excise Tax 8.13 

1940 Excise Tax 200.19 



L 



—68— 

1941 Excise Tax 1,519.06 

1942 Excise Tax 8,028.17 

$150,918.16 

. Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $116,330.82 

Abated 2,369.13 

Tax Titles 68.16 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1942 32,150.05 

$150,918.16 

CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes. 



—69— 



Report of Finance Committee 



We were in hopes to tell you approximately what your tax 
would be if our recommendations were followed, but these 
figures are not now available for this report. 

At the time of Town Meeting we hope to give you this 
information. 

This is the first year that we have faced a falling market 
as to income from the State of Massachusetts and this income 
is used to reduce the amount to be raised by taxation. 

War demands are more in many new directions so that at 
the time this report is going to press it appears as if we could 
not escape a substantial increase in taxes. 

Your Committee on Finance respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing recommendations for the ensuing year: 

General Government $ 7,700.00 

Bonds 275.00 

Buildings and Grounds 2,000.00 

Police Department 3,372.50 

Fire Department 2,700.00 

Forest Fires 700.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department 1,000.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Health Department 1,000.00 

Town Nurse and expenses 2,100.00 

Highways, Village 1,450.00 

Chapter 81 5,000.00 

Chapter 90 1,500.00 

Snow Removal, estimate 4,000.00 



-70- 



Street Lighting 3,750.00 

Public Welfare 2,500.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 21,000.00 

Veterans' Benefits 4,000.00 

Education - 54,376.00 

Library Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library Books 200.00 

Cemeteries 2,800.00 

Liability Insurance 700.00 

Memorial Day 250.00 

Expense Dog Officer 200.00 

Work Relief 25.00 

Jones Community Field 100.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 345.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 75.00 

Notes and Bonds ^ 2,000.00 

Unclassified \ . . . , . 650.00 

Rationing 1,300.00 

Spotting Tower 50.00 

Committee Public Safety 250.00 



$133,821.50 



For Education : 

We recommend the appropriation of $52,000.00, same as 
last year, with a War bonus added of $2,376.00, to be 
divided according to Plan *'A" presented by the school 
committee, allowing for payment of $100.00 to each 
regular teacher and principal and a proportionate amount 
for each special teacher, to be paid in installments of one- 
tenth in each school month of 1943. 

For Police Department : 

We recommend the sum of $3,372.50 be appropriated for 
the Police Department and that the Town go back to one 
full time officer, under the present conditions. 



I 



—71— 

The appropriation to be divided as follows : 

Chief's Salary $1,800.00 

Assistants' Salary for first three 

months 387.50 

Expenses and Operating Cruiser . . 950.00 

Chief's War Bonus for last nine 
months of year on the basis of 
$300.00 for one year or until a 
second full time officer is con- 
sidered by the Town 225.00 

$3,372.50 

Article 12: 

We recommend the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $500.00 for Town Forest Committee. 

Article 13: 

We believe this town is still a rural community and be- 
cause it is impossible to serve the v/hole town and because 
there are many farmers keeping pigs that would not want 
it, 

We recommend, that there be no money appropriated or 
any expense contracted to the town, but the control of 
garbage collection and disposal be vested in the Board of 
Health so the local communities can be best served. 

Article 14: 

Recommend no action. 

Article 17: 

Recommend we accept Section lOOA, Chapter 41, of the 
General Laws. 

Recommend the sum of $2,000.00 be appropriated from 
the Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 

The sum of $1,031.08 was transferred during 1942 from 
the Reserve Fund to the following accounts : 

Unclassified $ 100.00 

General Government 595.60 



—72— 

Buildings and Grounds 117.26 

Education 100.00 

Tree Warden 100.00 

Bonds 15.00 

Highways, Chapter 81 3.22 

$1,031.08 

Precinct 1 — Alden C. Flagg, V/. Stuart Allen 
Precinct 2 — Henry E. Tolman, William T. Merriam 
Precinct 3 — Porter Jenks, Albert W. Locke 

Finance Committee 



Report of Tree Warden 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1942. 

An appropriation of $500 was made for this work last 
year. This money was used for emergency work alone. There 
was so much heavy trucking during the past year it was 
necessary to remove many of the lower limbs from the trees 
on Main Street from the Maynard line to the Westford line, 
for the public safety. Also broken limbs and dead trees 
throughout the town were removed. 

Much of the necessary work has not been done as the 
appropriation was not large enough to do what was required. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $800 
be made for emergency work, such as trimming, bolting and 
removing trees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden, 



-73- 



Report of Superintendent of Moth Control Work 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1942. 

An appropriation of $1,000 was made for this work last 
year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $400. The 
labor and running expense of the sprayer and truck was about 
$550. This money w^as only used for spraying. There was 
one spray throughout the town for gypsy and browntail 
moths. Not enough money was left from the appropriation 
to allow for a proper spray for the elm leaf beetle. Conse- 
quently, part of the town trees were left in rather poor con- 
dition. There was no creosoting or scouting for gypsy moth 
egg clusters this year. These are two necessary and impor- 
tant parts of the moth control. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $1,500 
be made for spraying for the gypsy moth and elm leaf beetle 
and for creosoting of gypsy moth egg clusters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent. 



—74- 



Report of the Dog Officer 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I submit herewith my report as Dog Officer, covering 
work done for the year 1942. 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law .... 46 
Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance with 

law 5 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 74 

Warnings to delinquent owners to get licenses 112 

Appropriation $200.00 

46 dogs at $3.00 for six days 138.00 

46 dogs at $1.00 for six days 46.00 

Total for board and disposal 184.00 

Gentlemen : 

I, therefore, recommend that the appropriation for the 
year 1943 be the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dog Officer. 



—75— 

Treasurer's Report 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts : 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1942. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1942 $63,036.12 

Receipts for 1942 : 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Highways $10,841.04 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 15,492.68 

Highways, No. 90 1,536.19 

Aid Dependent Children, Federal . . 923.50 

Income Tax 14,439.00 

Aid Dependent Children 1,023.68 

Old Age Assistance 11,330.46 

Loss on Taxes 590.65 

Vocational Education 13.46 

Highways, Chap. 420 8,464.81 

Training Schools 198.94 

Meal Tax 194.20 

Tuition . . 1,315.39 

Business Corporation Tax 12,616.40 

Gas Light and Water 1.10 

State Aid 170.00 

Military Aid 247.50 

Public Health 25.00 

Aid and Transportation 240.00 

$79,664.00 



h 



—76— 



Received from County Treasurer: 

Highways $3,785.87 

Dog Refund 698.15 

Dog Officer Refund 190.00 



$4,674.02 



Received from Carrie M. Durkee, 
Collector of Taxes: 

Poll, 1940 $ 58.00 

Excise, 1940 47.43 

Tov^n, 1940 9,681.06 

Personal, 1940 808.84 

Town, 1941 12,972.85 

Excise, 1941 2,717.16 

Personal, 1941 405.96 

Poll, 1941 106.00 

Excise, 1942 6,770.59 

Poll, 1942 1,438.00 

Personal, 1942 10,549.63 

Town, 1942 69,526.15 

Interest 1,208.20 

Costs 40.95 



Miscellaneous Receipts : 
Harlan E. Tuttle, Dog Licenses . . . 
Town of Watertown, Old Age Assist. 

Ralph Rogers, Rent of Hall 

Town of Acton, Machinery Account 

Elwin Hollowell, Care Lots 

Concord District Court, Fines 

Selectmen, Licenses 

Board of Health, Nurse Services . . . 

City of Cambridge, Welfare 

Fred Kennedy, Sale Lots, Mt. Hope . 

Fred Kennedy, Care Lots 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 



$784.80 

75.00 

521.00 

561.00 

273.70 

261.15 

61.00 

191.50 

185.95 

88.00 

384.50 

390.00 



$116,330.82 



\ 



—77— 

Fred Kennedy, Lowering Device . . . 63.00 

Arthur Raymond, Tax Title 381.60 

Arthur Raymond, Interest 45.66 

Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines . . . 30.25 

Selectmen, Telephone Calls 1.84 

Carl E. Anderson, Sealer Weights . . 68.29 

Boston & Maine R. R., Fires 218.27 

First Nat. Bank Ayer, Rev. Loan . . 25,000.00 

Michael Foley, Revolver Permits, '41 10.00 

xMichael Foley, Revolver Permits, '42 7.50 

Michael Foley, Bicycle Registration 63.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, Lots Sold, Woodln. 85.00 

Town of Westford, Schools 253.70 

Town East Bridgewater, Welfare . . 91.00 

Town of Boxboro, Welfare 5.00 

Theron A. Lowden, Prem. Refund . 26.99 

Town of Concord, Land Tax 25.12 

City of Boston, Schools 172.26 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations 3.00 

C. A. Durkee Ins. Agy., Ins. Refund 213.44 

Town of Arlington, Old Age Assist. . 180.72 

Town of Concord, Old Age Assist. . 15.00 

Town of Wrentham, Old Age Assist. 129.28 

City of Brockton, Old Age Assist. . . 13.34 

City of Boston, Welfare 88.83 

Carrie M. Durkee, Certificates .... 12.00 

Town of Phillipston, Old Age Assist. 134.00 

Town of Boxboro, Tuition 1,600.00 

Arthur Kendall, Adj. Htg. Contract 17.10 

Elwin Hollowell, Return on Drum . 6.00 

Arthur F. Davis, Books Sold .90 

Transfer, Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 1,348.39 

Transfer, Cemetery Funds 1,262.28 

Transfer, Memorial Library 206.06 

Transfer, Blanchard Fund 25.00 



—78— 
Cancelled Checks 34.00 



$35,615.42 



Total Cash Receipts $236,284.26 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1942 . 63,036.12 

Sum Total for 1942 $299,320.38 

Payments in 1942 : 

Selectmen's Orders $214,637.37 

State Taxes 9,797.86 

$224,435.23 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1942 . . $ 74,885.15 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 

High School Bonds, due 1943 to 1945 $ 3,000.00 

High School Addition Notes, 162 to 176, due 1943 

to 1957 15,000.00 

Anticipation Revenue Loan, Note 178, due June 

25, 1943 25,000.00 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 

Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Principal Fund $82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 315.57 

$82,554.52 

Received Interest for 1942 1,752.80 

$84,307.32 
Balance December 31, 1942: 

Bank Balances in Banks $82,958.93 

Transfer to Tov^n Account 1,348.39 

$84,307.32 



i 



—79— 

CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Principal Fund $43,962.21 

Unexpended Balance 2,621.11 

$46,583.32 

Received for Perpetual Care 950.00 

Received Interest for 1942 972.30 



$48,505.62 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 

Bank Balances in Banks $47,243.34 

Transfer to Town Account 1,262.28 

$48,505.62 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Principal Fund $25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 1,581.52 

$26,581.52 

Received Interest for 1942 562.75 

Balance December 31, 1942 . . $27,144.29 

Bank Balances in Banks $26,869.27 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1942 275.00 

$27,144.27 

WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Principal Fund ... $14,100.96 

Unexpended Balance 289.04 

$14,390.00 

Received Interest for 1942 311.17 

Overdraft in the year 1941 200.00 

$14,901.17 



—80— 

Balance December 31, 1942: 

Bank Balances in Banks $14,695.11 

Transfer to Town Account 206.06 



$14,901.17 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1942: 

Principal Fund $13,500.00 

Unexpended Balance 62.49 

$13,562.49 

Received Interest for 1942 286.08 



$13,848.57 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 

Bank Balances in Banks $13,548.57 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1942 300.00 

$13,848.57 

LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Balance $1,505.13 

Received Interest for 1942 25.47 

$1,530.60 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 

Bank Balances in Banks $1,505.60 

Transfer to Town Account 25.00 

$1,530.60 

CEMETERY SURPLUS 
Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Balance $1,023.53 

Received Interest for 1942 20.56 



$1,044.09 



i 



—Si- 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 
Balance in Bank $1,044.09 

SARAH J. GREEN FUND 

Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Balance $150.00 

Unexpended Balance 1.00 

$151.00 

Received Interest for 1942 3.03 

$154.03 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 
Balance in Bank $154.03 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Balance $622.24 

Received Interest for 1942 12.50 

$634.74 
Balance December 31, 1942 : 
Balance in Bank $634.74 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1942 : 

Principal Fund $2,105.00 

Unexpended Balance 133.53 

$2,238.53 

Received to Fund : 

Company Salaries $230.00 

Interest for 1942 46.05 

$276.05 

$2,514.58 



—82— 

Balance December 31, 1942: 

Balance in Bank $2,510.58 

Paid Trustee's Order for 1942 4.00 



$2,514.58 
Rei^pectfully submitted, 

WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



I 



—83— 



Report of the Town Accountant 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton : 

I herewith submit my annual report covering the financial 
transactions of the town for the year ended December 31, 
1942. Included are a detailed statement of the expenditures of 
each department, a tabulated record showing the appropria- 
tions, transfers and the balances as of December 31, 1942. 
Also are included the statments of the Reserve Fund transfers. 
Machinery Fund, and Cemetery Land Fund, a balance sheet 
as of December 31, 1942. 

I have audited the books of the Collector of Taxes and 
verified the cash on hand. I have audited the books of the 
Treasurer and verified the several trust funds in his custody. 
I have verified the funds in the custody of Trustees. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



5! 



03 

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—88— 

Cash Receipts and Departmental Payments 

TREASURER'S RECEIPTS 
See Treasurer's Itemized Report . . . $236,284.26 $299,320.38 

Cash Balance January 1, 1942 63,036.12 

$299,320.38 

PAYMENTS 

General Government 
Selectmen, Salaries and 
Wages : 

Selectmen $ 700.01 

Clerks 1,034.00 

Selectmen's Assn. Dues . 6.00 

Stationerj^ and Postage . 55.89 

Town Reports 470.00 

Assn. of Finance Com- 
mittees 10.00 

Sundry Expense 20.55 

$2,296.45 

Collector of Taxes : 

Salary $1,000.00 

Stationery and Postage . 161.38 

Printing and Adv 58.44 

Sundry Expense 9.96 

$1,229.78 

Assessors : 

Salaries $850.00 

Transfers 32.17 

Metal file 46.96 

Attending meetings .... 35.00 

Stationery 102.82 

Sundry expense .55 

$1,067.50 

Treasurer : 

Salary $500.00 



I 



—89— 

Stationery and Postage . 167.43 

Telephone 12.50 

Safe deposit box 6.00 

Certification of note . . . 2.00 

Sundry expense 2.50 

$690.43 

Town Accountant : 

Salary $500.00 

Stationery, postage .... 38.06 

$538.06 

Town Clerk : 

Salary $200.00 

Rec. vital statistics .... 84.75 

Stationery, printing .... 93.24 

Binding records 5.72 

Postage 15.00 

Telephone 20.00 

Attending meetings .... 10.00 

Sundry expense 2.00 

$430.71 

Public Welfare: 

Salaries 259.38 

Cattle Inspector: 

Salary 125.00 

Sealer of Weights and 
Measures : 

Sal. and Transportation . $200.00 

Supplies 17.32 

Advertising 2.25 

$219.57 

Soldiers' Relief Agent : 

Salary $50.00 

Membership dues, Mass. 

Assn 2.00 $52.00 



—90— 

Board of Health: 

Salaries 48.32 

Election and Registration : 
Salaries and Wages — 

Registration .... $275.00 

Election officers ..... 195.00 

Labor on voting booths 5.75 

Moderator 35.00 

Street lists 84.38 

Lunches 22.54 

Posting warrants 25.00 

Rent 52.00 

Printing 143.73 



$838.40 $7,795.60 



Bonds : 

Collector, Treasurer, Town 

Clerk, Deputy Collector $266.50 

Buildings and Grounds : 
Salaries and Wages — 

Janitor $410.86 

Care of clock and flag 58.00 

Repairs 59.49 

Care of grounds 139.51 

Grading, inc. fertilizer 68.60 

Heat 577.20 

Light 350.49 

Telephone 70.26 

Water 17.85 

Flags 23.78 

Cleaning bronze tablets . 20.00 

Lawn mower 15.00 

Cement 13.92 

Light fixtures 15.40 

Sundry items 146.56 

New chain for clock . . . 130.34 



$2,117.26 






—91— 

Protection of Persons and 
Property : 

Police Department — 

Salaries and Wages — 

Chief $1,875.87 

Patrolman 1,568.44 

Special officers 71.25 

Telephone 104.10 

Gas and oil 245.29 

Printing, postage 28.38 

Servicing radio 33.75 

Auto repairs 45.55 

Tires 45.70 

Medical services 8.00 

Auto insurance 12.00 

Reflectors 40.00 

Plates for bicycles 24.00 

Flashlights 11.60 

Chains 4.80 

Receiver ^ 31.00 

Sundry items 5.22 

$4,154.95 

Cruiser Equipped with Radio $1,499.00 

Fire Department : 

Salaries and Wages — 

Annual Salaries $460.00 

Fires 611.48 

Janitors 360.00 

Gas and Oil 57.11 

Towel service 10.00 

Heat 355.83 

Light 148.58 

Telephone 97.96 

Water 36.00 

Hose racks 36.70 

Badges 65.77 



—92— 

Repairs to equipment . . 72.55 

Equipment 232.49 

Sundry 61.97 



Tree Warden: 

Salaries and Wages — 

Supt $350.43 

Labor 77.40 

Trucks 130.25 

Tools 8.03 

Tree paint 2.75 

Sundry 3.41 

Health Department: 
Salaries and Wages — 

Agent $ 69.30 

Labor at dump 588.00 



$2,606.44 



Forest Fires : 

Salaries and Wages — 

Fire Patrol $305.00 

Fires 481.12 

786.12 

New Hose 2,990.00 

Rubber boots and coats . 362.37 

Hydrant rental 3,453.00 

Moth Department : 
Salaries and Wages — 

Supt $189.01 

Labor 238.20 

Truck 54.00 

Spraying material 453.75 

Repairs 15.81 

Gas and oil 34.90 

Sundry 14.28 



999.95 



572.27 



—93— 

Prof, service 170.00 

Gasoline 6.94 

Postage .75 

Supplies 36.00 

Sundry 2.80 

Town Nurse — 

Salary $2,000.00 

Supplies . 119.80 



Dog Officer: 

Keeping and killing dogs $184.00 
Postage and printing . . 2.75 



Highivays 
Village : 

Salaries and Wages — 

Supt $146.25 

Includes use of truck 

Labor . 187.00 

Truck 173.75 

Equipment rental 146.00 

Broken stone 101.34 

Gas 8.50 

Paint 90.29 

Sundry items 110.69 

Chapter 81 : 

Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendent $1,696.00 

Includes use of truck 

Labor 4,935.70 

Trucks 3,197.00 

Equipment rental 2,779.50 

Broken stone 400.80 

Tar and road oil 1,638.69 

Gravel 68.70 



873.79 



2,119.80 



186.75 



$963.82 



—94— 

Concrete pipe, culverts . 1,532.56 

Bricks 261.00 

Guard rail posts 312.00 

Grates and frames 237.15 

Sundry items 44.12 



$17,103.22 



Chapter 90, Maintenance: 
Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendent $481.50 

Includes use of truck 

Labor 1,507.20 

Trucks 504.75 

Equipment rental 465.50 

Broken stone 503.55 

Cable guards 104.00 

Sand 16.20 

Tar and road oil 836.00 

Sewer pipe 161.70 

$4,580.40 

Total Highways $22,647.44 

Snow Removal: 

Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendent $511.64 

Includes use of truck 

Labor 556.15 

Trucks 699.01 

Equipment rental 88.50 

Plowing snow 1,247.50 

Blades and parts 541.60 

Salt 209.00 

Sand 20.10 

Gas 2.79 

Sundry items 31.96 



$3,908.25 



Machinery Account: 

New equip., tools, etc ... $370.25 
Gas and oil 257.84 



—95- 



Repairs to equipment . . . 


102.78 




Sundry items 


8.58 


S789 45 


Street Lierhtinff 




3,844.76 


Charities : 






Public Welfare, 






Temporary Aid — 






Attended meetings . . . 


$ 24.58 




Stationery 


1.87 




Fuel 


187.28 




Rent 


275.10 




Light 


3.07 




Provisions 


16.03 




Medical Aid 


11.00 

100.00 

5.00 




Burial 


. 


Transportation 




Cash to Individuals . . 


1,015.00 




Relief by other cities 






and towns 


2,044.47 


$3,683.40 






Aid to Dependent Children : 






Cash Aid 


$860.46 




U. S. Grant: 






Cash Aid 


923.50 






$1,783.96 






Old Age Assistance: 






Cash Aid 


$17,673.48 




Aid by other cities and 






tov^ns 


252.00 

^17 9"^^ iS 






tp ± t yVLjO.'-tO 




U. S. Grant: 






Administration — 






Salary and Expense . . 


$ 499.71 




Assistance — 






Cash Aid 


14,992.97 






$15,492.68 


33,418.16 



—96— 

Soldiers' Relief 

Travel Expense $ 5.93 

Rent 80.00 

Fuel 45.50 

Milk 167.90 

Cash Aid ' 270.80 



570.13 



State Aid : 

Cash Aid 180.00 

Education : 

See Report of School Committee 52,090.93 

Library 
Maintenance : 

Salary and Wages — 

Librarian $108.00 

Assistant librarian . . . 153.00 

Janitor 153.00 

Rebinding books, cata- 
loguing, writing 

cards, etc 52.45 

Postage 1.01 

Heat 306.41 

Light 53.19 

Water 12.00 

Insurance 49.67 

Sundry items 9.28 



$898.01 



Branch Libraries : 
Salaries and Wages — 

Librarians $212.00 

Janitor service 21.60 

Heat 37.66 

Transportation of books 43.00 



$314.26 $1,212.27 



—97— 

Library Books : 

Books, magazines, etc. . . $406.06 

Cemeteries 
Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendents $1,015.06 

Labor 627.80 

Laying out lots and 
compiling report of 
lots under perpetual 

care $ 26.50 

Prof, services 25.00 

Trucks 145.38 

Seed, loam, fertilizer . . . 165.97 

Cement 13.90 

Piper, fittings, labor . . . 39.85 

Spraying 27.08 

Water 34.85 

Flowers and shrubs .... 39.90 
Printing and postage, tel- 
ephone 31.12 

Lumber 18.35 

Insurance 45.00 

Light 10.50 

Burial equipment 140.93 

Sundry items 108.00 

$2,515.19 



Perpetual Care: 

Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendents $642.50 

Labor 509.10 

Flowers 73.40 

Fertilizer 20.83 

Welding fence 12.50 

Sundry items 3.95 



$1,262.28 



—OS- 
Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund : 
Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendent $557.12 

Labor 284.38 

Trees and shrubs 291.93 

Loam K . .. 104.00 

Weed killer 52.75 

Trucks 54.00 

Sundry items 4.21 



Memorial Day: 

Music $125.00 

Flowers and wreaths . . 53.00 

Flags 36.68 

Refreshments 8.05 

Sundry items 4.65 



$1,348.39 



Luke Blanchard Fund : 

Care of lots 25.00 

Work Relief: 

Treas. of U. S. A. Project $15.60 
Surplus Commodities Di- 
vision Rent 12.50 

28.10 



$227.38 



Liability Insurance: 

Premium 707.42 

Seats for Town Hall 250.00 

Power Grader 2,691.96 

Jones Community Field: 
Salaries and Wages — 

Superintendent $145.20 

Labor 75.00 

Gas and oil 41.63 

Sundry items 6.00 

$267.83 



-99- 



Insurance on High School : 

Premiums 187.67 

Heating Plant for Town Hall : 

Contract $2,390.90 

Extras 70.00 

Door and wiring material 26.16 

Over-payment, refunded 

See Treas. receipts . . . 17.10 

$2,504.16 



Spotting Tower: 

Lumber, etc $232.05 

Steel, bolts, etc 36.03 

Coal 11.50 

Installing telephone .... 14.35 

Sundry items 4.57 



$298.50 



Redemption of Tax Titles: 

Exp. 2 trips to Boston . . 5.00 

Committee on Public Safety: 
Salaries and Wages — 

Clerk $124.50 

Postage and printing . . . 33.11 

Telephone 56.78 

Supplies 10.03 

Typewriter 79.50 

Fire Alarm installed . . . 88.00 

Sirens (3) 135.00 

Curtains 22.75 

Lumber 13.48 

Badges, pens and buttons 71.80 

Sundry items 46.74 



State Guard Unit : 

Clothing $873.14 

Ammunition and targets 125.00 



$681.69 



$998.14 



—100— 

Hospital Unit: 

Medical supplies $195.86 

Gauze 38.82 

Canvas 12.25 

Lumber 90.01 

Soil pipe '..... 24.58 

Pipe and fittings 163.02 

Sundry items 4.12 

Unclassified : 

Salaries and Wages — 

Surveying $10.00 

Legal advice 25.00 

Damages 12.50 

Flags 16.50 

Sundry items 6.75 

Rationing Board: 

Salaries and Wages — 

Clerk $217.00 

Postage 3.15 

Supplies, printing, sta- 
tionery 80.41 

Cabinet 28.46 

Sundry items 5.35 

Notes and Bonds : 

High School bonds $1,000.00 

High School addl. bonds . 1,000.00 



Int. on notes and bonds : 

High school bonds . . . $160.00 
High School addition 

bonds 240.00 



$528.66 $2,208.49 



$70.75 



$334.37 $405.12 



$2,000.00 



$400.00 



Interest on Revenue Loans 58.50 



—101— 

No Appropriation Items 

Revenue Loans $25,000.00 

Highway Loan 10,000.00 

Agency : 

State tax . $9,300.00 

State Parks 119.25 

State Corporation Public 

Service Tax 378.61 

County Tax 4,855.09 

Co. Hospital Assessment 1,012.12 

$15,665.07 



Refunds : 




Motor Vehicle Exc. taxes 


$90.34 


Real and Personal Prop- 




erty taxes 


46.02 


Poll taxes 


2.00 



$138.36 
Middlesex County Dog Licenses . . . . $ 766.20 

Middlesex County Sale of Dogs 6.00 

Transferred to Library Fund 200.00 



Total Expenditures $224,435.23 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1942 . . 74,885.15 



$299,320.38 



Statement of Reserve Fund Transfers: 

General Government $ 595.60 

Buildings and Grounds 117.26 

Unclassified 100.00 

Education 100.00 

Bonds, Town Officers 15.00 

Highway, Chapter 81 8.22 

Tree Warden 100.00 

$1,031.08 

Unexpended balance 968.92 

$2,000.00 



—102— 

Statement of Machinery Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1942 $787.20 

Received from Town of Acton Ren- 
tal of Road Machinery 561.00 

Transferred to Road Machinery Acct. $750.00 
Balance, December 31, 1942 598.20 

Statement of Cemetery Land Fund : 

Balance, January 1, 1942 $224.35 

Received from sale of lots 163.00 

$387.35 

Balance, December 31, 1942 $387.35 



$1,348.20 
$1,348.20 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Department 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 

1942 



•109— 



Organization 

School Committee 

Miss Fannie E. Davis, Chairman Term expires 1943 

Mrs. Arthur Fraser 

(appointed until 1943) . . Term expires 1944 

Mr. Robert C. Hall Term expires 1945 

Mr. Richard Lowden Term expires 1945 

Mr. Edward A. Schmitz Term expires 1943 

(Mrs. G. Howard Reed for January and February, 1943) 

Mr. Walter B. Stevens Term expires 1944 

Meetings of the School Committee 
Regular meetings of the school committee are held the 
first Tuesday of each month in the high school at 8:00 p.m. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superinte7ident 

Richard B. Greenman 

Office— High School Building, Telephone 110 

School Physician Ernest A. Mayell, M.D. 

East Acton, Telephone 345-3 

School Nurse Mrs. Simon D. Taylor, R.N. 

North Acton, Telephone 33-22 

Attendance Officer Carl Anderson 

West Acton, Telephone 105 or 16-12 

Custodians : 

High School, Tel 110 Daniel MacDougall 

Center School, Tel, 86 Ralph Rogers 

South School, Tel. 445 Benjamin Sawyer 

West School, Tel. 105 Carl Anderson 



—110— 

Tentative Calendar- for 1943 
January 4 — Schools open. 
February 19 — Schools close. 
March 1 — Schools open. 
April 16 — Schools close 
April 26 — Schools open. 
May 31 — Holiday (Memorial Day). 
June 4 — Elementary schools close. 
June 11 — High school graduation. 
June 18 — High school closes. 

School Year 19J,3-19U 
September 8 — High school opens. 
September 13 — Elementary schools open 
October 12 — Holiday (Columbus Day). 
October 29 — Teachers' Convention. 
November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 
November 25 and 26 — Thanksgiving Recess. 
December 23 — Elementary schools close. 
December 24 — High school closes. 

19U 
January 3 — Schools open. 
February 18 — Schools close. 
February 28 — Schools open. 
April 14 — Schools close. 
April 24 — Schools open. 
May 31 — Holiday (Memorial Day). 
June 2 — Elementary schools close. 
June 9 — High school graduation. 
June 16 — High school closes. 

No School Signal — All Schools All Day 
7:00 A.M., fire whistle in all precincts— 2-2-2-2 
7:00-8:00 A.M., radio announcements over WBZ and WEEI 



— Ill— 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

i. Ad7nission to School 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school until 
they are 5 years, 8 months of age on or before September 1, 
except in the case of those children 5 years, 6 months of age 
on September 1, whose mental age and physical condition are 
satisfactory. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first 
two weeks of school. All children entering for the first time 
must present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 5i/4 hours in the 
elementary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with suffi- 
cient recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to 
pupils except by the principals or persons delegated by the 
principals. 

3. School Busses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils 
must meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct 
themselves properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly. They 
must present a written excuse signed by parent or guardian 
for each absence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon not 
longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and for a 
longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Sec- 
tion 15: 



—112— 

*'A child from a household where a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other infectious 
or contagious disease, or from a household exposed to con- 
tagion from any such disease in another household, shall not 
attend any public school during such illness or exposure until 
the teacher of the school has been furnished with a certificate 
from the local board of health, school physician or from the 
attending physician, stating that danger of conveying such 
disease by such child has passed." 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them 
by the school authorities, and shall not mar or injure any form 
of school property. 

S. Fire Drill 

Fire drills shall be given at least once in two weeks in the 
elementary schools and at least once a month in the high 
school. 



—US- 
Teachers in Service 

As of January 1, lOJ+o 



Center School 





Appt. 


Robert T. Roy, Prin., 


1942 


B. S. E. 




Ruth Berglind 


1935 


Louisa Jordan (Mrs.), 


1942 


B. S. E. 




South School 




Julia McCarthy, Prin. 


1906 


Florence Merriam 


1927 


Carolyn Tuttle, B. S. E. 


1940 



Graduate of 
Hyannis State College 

Lesley Normal School 
Hyannis State College 



Fitchburg State College 
Fitchburg State College 
Fitchburg State College 



Home Addres.s 
West Acton 

South Acton 
Acton 



South Acton 
South Acton 
South Acton 



West School 

Howard A. Libbv 1942 

Grace Callanan, B. S. E. 1935 

Helen Connell, B. S. E. 1942 

Alice Feehan, B. S. E. 1938 



Gorham Normal School 
Fitchburg State College 
Boston University 
Fitchburg State College 



West Acton 
Wesc Acton 
South Acton 
South Acton 



High School 

Richard B. Greenman, Prin. 1935 

A. B., Ed. M. 

Walter W. Holt, Vice-Prin. 1928 

of S. H. S., B. S., M. A. 

Kalervo Kansanniva, Vice- 1938 

Prin, of J. H. S., B. S. E. 

Lydia Abbott, A. B. 1942 

Rebecca Bartlett, B. S. E. 1939 

Margaret Boornazian 1929 

Ruth Eynon, B. S. E. 1941 

Robert Harris, A. B. 1940 

Ralph Hayes 1942 

Wilbert Hayes 1942 

Henry Hopkinson, L. L. B. 1930 

Marjorie Jones, B. S. 1931 

Marion Towne, A. B. 1921 



Harvard University and 
Boston University 
Dartmouth College and 
Boston University 
Fitchburg State College 

Colby College 
Framingham State Coll. 
Burdett College 
Salem State College 
Harvard University 
Castelton Normal School 
Gorham Normal School 
Northeastern Law School 
Simmons College 
Smith College 



West Acton 

East Acton 

East Acton 

West Acton 
East Acton 
West Acton 
East Acton 
Acton 
Boxboro 
West Acton 
West Acton 
South Acton 
Concord 



Supervisors 

Rosemary O'Neil, B. S. E. 1942 

Constance Russo 1941 

Charles K. Yeremian 1941 



B. U. Sargent School 
School of Practical Art 
Longy School of Music 



South Acton 

Waltham 

Watertown 



—114— 



School Committee 



To the Voters of Acton: 

The school committee herewith submits its report with 
that of the superintendent of schools for the year 1942. 

Mrs. Olive Bundy of South Acton resigned from the com- 
mittee in August, to join the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, 
lier office was filled by Mrs. Margaret Fraser, who was voted 
by the remaining members of the committee, and the select- 
men, to fill the vacancy until the March election. 

Acton has lost several teachers during the year to the 
armed forces and better paying positions. There is an acute 
shortage of teachers, and it is almost impossible to replace 
those who leave here for better positions. 

The committee has very carefully figured the 1943 budget, 
and, because of existing conditions, feels justified in asking for 
additional money to operate on, and to try to hold our teachers 
for the benefit of the youth of Acton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE E. DAVIS, Chairman. 



I 



—115— 

Comparison of Net Cost for Acton Schools 

1941 1942 

Received by town treasurer on account of schools — 
State Treasurer: 

General School Fund (state aid on 

account of teachers' salaries) . $4,110.00 $4,519.00 

Tuition of State Wards (full) . . 779.84 1,315.39 

Vocational Education— Waltham . 108.09 212.40 

Trade School (one-half) 

Middlesex Training School (one- 
half) 55.06 

Boxboro Tuition 1,313.43 1,600.00 

Westford Tuition 217.44 132.12 

City of Boston, tuition of wards . . 115.56 172.26 

Total received $6,699.42 $7,951.17 

Appropriated $47,375.00 $52,100.00 

Spent from appropriation 47,369.01 52,080.83 

Received by town treasurer .... 6,699.42 7,951.17 

Net cost $40,669.59 $44,129.66 

Notes : 

1. Receipts were larger in 1942 because of 

a. One additional teacher. 

b. A large group of boys attending the Waltham 

Trade School. 

c. An increase in paying students. 

1940-41 1941-42 
Wards 14 42 

Boxboro students 10 17 

2. The tovni will receive $190 in 1943 from the U. S. 
Government for the sale of school typewriters as 
requested by the Treasury Department. 



—116— 

3. The net cost of education in Acton in 1942 was 
$7951.17 (about 15%) less than the amount appro- 
priated. 

4. In comparing the school costs in 1941 and 1942, the 
increase in appropriation was $4,725, but the increase 
in net cost was only $3,460.07. 

5. The large number of wards and out-of-town students 
attending Acton Schools accounts for the large re- 
ceipts, about 15% of the appropriation in 1942. Thus 
the appropriation in Acton cannot be compared on an 
equal basis with that of all other towns of the same 
size and valuation. It appears that the net cost of 
schools in Acton is not excessive. 

6. The townspeople, through their school committee, are 
at a turning point as far as the schools are concerned. 
The choice is between a policy of operating the schools 
at a minimum of cost, regardless of the service given, 
and a policy of operating the schools economically for 
the long-range benefit of the students at a slightly 
higher cost than at present, but one which the town 
can afford. The choice is now before the town. 

Acton School Department 

Proposed Budget for 1948 

1H2 1943 

2. Supt. of Schools and General 

Expenses $ 2,500 $ 2,500 

3. Supervisors (3) 2,200 3,550 

4. Principals 

High (1) 1,000 1,200 

Elementary (3) 4,100 4,940 

5. Teachers 

High (12) 17,800 21,140 

Elementary (7) 7,800 9,410 



—117— 

6. Textbooks 800 700 

7. Stationery and Misc. Supplies 1,500 1,350 

8. Wages of Janitors 3,840 3,840 

9. Fuel 2,180 2,180 

10. Janitor's Supplies and Power 1,200 1,200 

11. Repairs 1,100 500 

12. Libraries 55 200 

13. Health 300 300 

14. Transportation 5,000 4,750 

15. Sundries 125 140 

16. Vocational Education 500 100 



$52,000 $58,000 

Summary of Expenses for Support for Year 

Ending December 31, 194-2 

Superintendent, Salary and Travelling Expenses . $2,150.00 

Office Expenses 476.65 

Total General Control $2,626.65 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors' Salaries, Drawing, Music, Physical 

Education . . . 2,062.50 

High School Principal 1,000.00 

High School Teachers 17,501.48 

Elementary Principals 4,107.50 

Elementary Teachers 7,385.00 

$32,056.48 

High School Textbooks 616.35 

Elementary Textbooks 448.18 

High School Stationery and Supplies 1,094.63 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies 732.00 

$2,891.16 



—118— 

High School Operating Expenses 

Janitor $1,391.44 

Fuel 1,047.78 

Miscellaneous 852.52 



$3,291.74 



Elementary Operating Expeiises 

Janitors $2,404.00 

Fuel 956.98 

Miscellaneous 538.12 



$3,899.10 

Total Operating Expenses ; 7,190.84 

High School Maintenance and Repairs 455.66 

Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 1,130.24 



Total Maintenance and Repairs $1,585.90 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health, High $149.50 

Health, Elementary . . 125.00 

Libraries 107.05 

Transportation 4,925.0N 

Vocational Education 188.16 

Miscellaneous Expenses, High 156.99 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Elementary 78.10 



$5,729.80 

Total Expended $52,080.83 

Unexpended Balance 19.17 



Appropriation $52,100.00 



—119— 



Report of the Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee of Acton, Massachusetts, 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my second annual report for the year 
ending December 30, 1942. 

In March 1942, Mr. Robert C. Hall and Mr. Richard Low- 
den were elected to the school committee for a three-year 
term, and Mr. Edward A. Schmitz was elected to serve until 
1943. Miss Fannie E. Davis was elected chairman, and the 
superintendent was elected clerk of the school committee. 
When Mrs. Hazel O. Bundy resigned in August 1942 to enter 
the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, Mrs. Arthur Eraser was 
appointed to serve until the next regular town election. 

Teachers 
The following teachers terminated their service since 
January 1, 1942: Mr. Clayton E. Craig (to become principal 
of a school in Jaffrey, N. H.), Miss Helen Appleby (to be 
married), Mr. Robert L. Perry (naval reserve). Miss Cecelia 
Calianan (to teach in North Attleboro), Mr. John Mitchell 
(navy), Mr. Roger T. Walsh (navy), and Miss Rita O'Donnell 
(WAAC). Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Walsh are on leave of 
absence. 

The following teachers were appointed : Miss Helen B. 
Connell, elementary remedial teacher; Miss Rosemary O'Neill, 
physical education supervisor; Miss Lydia Abbott, junior high 
school ; Robert T. Roy, principal of Center School ; Howard A. 
Libby, principal of West School ; and Wilbert Hayes, industrial 
arts. 

Mrs. Chester Jordan (Louisa Wood) was transferred to 



—120— 

Grades 1 and 2 in the Center School, and Mr. Ralph Hayes to 
the high school English and coaching position. 

Five teachers are studying at the Boston University 
School of Education, and three men teachers are taking a 
refresher course in niathematics at the Harvard University 
School of Education under the ESMWT (Engineering, Science 
and Management War Training) program set up by the gov- 
ernment to train teachers not in the field of mathematics or 
physics to take the place of teachers in those fields nov^ in 
service. 

Salaries 
In the 14 school months between September 1, 1941 and 
December 31, 1942 there have been 14 resignations in a staff 
of 26 teachers and principals, an average of one a month. 
This is more than a 50 '/r turnover, compared with 307^ for 
1941. In one year there have been 3 physical training super- 
visors and 3 eighth grade teachers. The need is still clear for 
increasing salaries enough to retain and attract teachers, who 
are the most important single factor in the education of our 
children. It is economical to pay what a teacher is worth, and 
it is costly to subject students to an ever-changing staff. The 
co-operative spirit and excellent work of our present staff, 
however, as reported m many quarters, suggest that the Acton 
people should have the best schools they can afford by keeping 
the staff as a unit. The answer lies in adequate salaries. 

Financial 
Your attention is directed to the net cost of our schools 
rather than to the amount appropriated. In 1942 the appro- 
priation was $52,100, but the net cost was only $44,129.66. 
The amount received by the town on account of schools was 
$7,951.17, about 15% of the appropriation, the receipts being 
listed in another part of this report under ''Comparison of Net 
Cost for Acton Schools." 

Your attention is also called to the urgent need to main- 
tain our present staff of teachers. The committee asks for 



—121— 

$6,000 additional to do this, which is about three-fourths of 
the amount the town received on account of schools in 1942. 
It is reasonable to use part of this income for adequate sal- 
aries, for the town does not consider the schools a source of 
revenue. 

The long-range benefits from a plan of adequate salaries 
are readily seen. Teachers will not come to Acton only for 
experience, using the tov/n as a stepping stone, as they have 
in the past, but will take a more lasting interest in the com- 
munity. Good will on the part of the town toward the 
teachers in the form of adequate salaries long needed, will 
build up the school department and place it on a firm founda- 
tion. The parade of teachers will stop and the result will be 
a more effective training for our children, v/hich all parents 
desire. 

School Plant 
Improvements in the school plant follow : 

South School : 

Painting exterior. 

Plastering and painting one room. 

New bulletin boards. 

New fire escape door. 

Recapping chimney. 

Two radiators added. 

Center School : 

Cement floor in part of basement. 

Work bench and shelves for janitor supplies. 
West School : Washing walls. 
High School : Painting boys' toilet. 

Special appropriations will be needed in the near future. 
The high school roof, leaking in four places, December 30, 
1942, will need to be replaced. The plaster and paint in 
Blanchard Hall need attention. The 5 hot air and 4 steam 
heaters in the 3 elementary buildings, costly to operate, should 
be replaced as a matter of economy, by a single steam boiler 



—122— 

in each building and additional radiators. Before the eye- 
sight of elementary children can be safeguarded with 150-watt 
bulbs, the wiring of each building must be replaced in order 
to carry the load of electricity safely. Some new floors in the 
elementary buildings are needed. A consolidated elementary 
school would be an economy. 

War and High School Program 
The war has brought a number of changes in the high 
school program : 

1. Physical fitness classes for every boy and girl 90 min- 
utes a week. 

2. Aeronautics class (6 boys, 1 girl). 

3. Solid Geometry and Trigonometry class for seniors 
(15 members). 

4. Standard First Aid Course required for senior girls. 

5. Pre-induction course in shopwork, approved by the 
War Department. 

6. Penny milk for all students to increase health (one- 
half pint for one cent). 

7. War stamps on sale daily in the corridor. 

8. Large servings of food at minimum prices through 
surplus commodities and wholesale purchases. 

9. Granting of war-time diplomas to seniors in good 
standing leaving after February 1 for military serv- 
ice, early entrance to college, agriculture or industry 
with approval of senior adviser, principal, and school 
committee. 

10. New folder-type of diploma. 

Scholarship 
The Honor Roll requirements have been raised as follows : 
High honors — all A's; Honors — 2 or more A's and the rest 
B's. Graduates in 1942 now attend Massachusetts State Col- 
lege, Framingham and Hyannis State Teachers' Colleges, 



' 



—123— 

Becker Junior College and Boston College. Three scholarships 
were awarded: $100 by the Acton High School Scholarship 
Fund to Virginia Godfrey; $50 by the Acton Center Woman's 
Club to Florence Lawson; and $50 by the Acton Parent- 
Teacher Association to Helen Bjorklund. The West Acton 
Woman's Club, the Class of 1942, and the Class of 1943 made 
generous contributions to the Scholarship Fund. 

Acton High School Scholarship Fund 
For the year ending June 30, 1942 contributions amount- 
ing to $100 have been received from the West Acton Woman's 
Club and from the Classes of 1941, 1942, and 1943. The 
balance on July 1, 1942 w^as $493.65. It is a policy of the 
trustees to award or lend at least $100 a year, hoping to 
receive in gifts at least the same amount. 

Orgnization of High School 
The junior and senior high school grades were set apart 
in two units w^ith a vice-principal for each, Mr. Kansanniva 
and Mr. Holt. Separate lunch periods, assemblies, and social 
events are held, although the school unites in many activities. 
Most teachers have classes in both units. 

New textbooks w^ere adopted in Mathematics, English, 
History, Science and French. 

A detailed course of studies for Acton in Arc, Music and 
Physical Education have been made. 

Parent-Teacher Association 
The continued co-operation of the P. T. A. has been of 
great benefit to the school department. Its support of the 
hot lunch program in Acton Center, the Milk Fund, the Schol- 
arship Fund, the Stage Equipment Fund is greatly appre- 
ciated. 

Health 
The dental work was discontinued in 1942 because no 
dentist could be secured to carry on the work. Some cases, 
however, were treated by neighboring dentists. The penny- 



—124— 

miik program, started in November, has made available to 
every student a half-pint bottle of milk for Ic, the Acton 
School Milk Fund paying .95c and the Agricultural Marketing 
Administration paying the balance. The demand for milk 
increased in all schools and more than doubled in the high 
school. The Dental Fund has a balance of $9.66. A Health 
Survey of the Acton Schools was made by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health, many of the recommendations 
already being in effect. 

Athletic Association 
All athletic teams showed excellent spirit and improve- 
ment in skill under the coaches : Miss O'Donnell, Miss O'Neill, 
Mr. Walsh, Mr. Kansanniva and Mr. Ralph Hayes. Total 
receipts of the association were $1371.86 and payments were 
$1165.93, the balance being $205.93. Sales in the fall maga- 
zine campaign to support the A. A. reached a new total of 
$712.50. A basketball banquet for the boys' and girls' squads 
was held in March. 

Reports of Special Departments 
Physical Training 

High School Girls and Elementary Schools 
A country at war needs youths who are physically fit. 
Therefore, a Physical Fitness Program is being pursued in 
the schools. The purpose of the program is to develop 
strength, agility and endurance. This end is accomplished 
through conditioning exercises and vigorous activities. 

In the elementary schools there are exercises, mimetics, 
singing, games, story plays, relay races and games suitable for 
the age group. 

In the junior and senior high schools every girl has two 
periods per week of physical education, plus extra curricular 
sports. Among the activities taken by the girls are exercises, 
folk dancing, stunts, tumbling and modern dancing. The par- 
ticular phase taken in modern dancing is a study in rhythm, 



—125— 

space, time and focus, and the dancing is accompanied by 
percussive instruments. 

The extra-curricula sports are field hockey, basketball, 
Softball, hiking, bowling and skating. In the three former 
sports, the teams participate in intra-mural and inter-school 
competition. 

Every student is given a physical examination, and phys- 
ical education is required for all except those excused by a 
doctor. Hot and cold showers are compulsory after all ac- 
tivity. 

Posture is stressed in all classes, posture tests are given 
and suggestions for improvement are made. Talks on health 
and cleanliness are also included in this program. 

Suggestions : 

1. Gymnasium uniforms required for all class work. 

2. Warm sweat suits purchased by the A. A. for school 
team players. 

A Physical Education Demonstration will be held at the 
High School on February 17, 1943. 

Rosemary O'Neill 

High School Boys 
December 5, 1942 marked the initial appearance of a 
revised physical fitness program for all boys from Grades 7 
through 12. Designed to replace the old course, the new 
program meets the present needs for health improvement 
through carefully planned calisthenics, elementary skills in 
tumbling, wrestling and boxing, wand drills and other valuable 
co-ordination exercises, and finally, the completion of endur- 
ance tests adapted by grades to meet minimum requirements 
as established within each individual group. Supplementing 
the new schedule will be varied sports for the purpose of 
developing the spirit of competition. 



—126— 

In embryo at present, the program has been well received 
by all classes, who spend ninety minutes each Tuesday, and, as 
planned, a supplementary afternoon period for the more 
enthusiastic students. To insure greater interest and scien- 
tific development in the various desired skills, professional 
advice and assistance* has been assured. 

Kalervo Kansanniva 

Music 

After a year of instruction and observation, I am happy 
to present my second annual report as supervisor of music. 

A. Pro (J)' ess 

1. Established a much needed course of studies for 
Grades 1-12, in order to insure uniform training in 
the entire school system, including vocal, instru- 
mental, chamber music, theory and music apprecia- 
tion. 

2. Organized Rhythm Band in Grades 1 and 2 to stimu- 
late musical interest and appreciation. 

3. Instruments and music purchased: 

a. Nine musical instruments. 

b. Rhythm instruments for all first and second 

grades. 

c. Four books for the high school music library. 

d. Set of large colored picture of symphonic instru- 

ments. 

e. All vocal and instrumental music for the high 

school. 

f . Forty-one symphonic and operatic records for the 

high school. 

g. Development of a high school orchestra of 22 

members, 
h. Fourteen students receiving instrumental in- 
struction, our future material for the high 
school orchestra. 



I 



—127— 

i. Established annual spring music festival. 

j. Six music stands for the high school orchestra. 

k. Loan of six instruments to the school department 

by citizens of Acton. 
1. A gift of a violin by Miss Julia McCarthy. 

B. Recommendations 
For a better functioning program on a higher level of 
musical instruction, I would like to present the following rec- 
ommendations for your consideration: 

1. Replacement of music books in the lower grades. 

2. Replacement of music books for Grades 7 and 8. 

3. An appropriation of a sum annually for high school 
chorus and orchestra music. 

4. Credit to high school students for outside music study. 
(Now in effect in East Bridgewater.) 

5. Creation of a harmony and composition class as an 
advanced course of music appreciation. 

6. An extra period for the high school orchestra and 
chorus. 

7. An additional day of teaching in order to follow effec- 
tively the extended course of study from elementary 
grades to the high school. 

The morale of all groups is excellent. I wish to extend 
my sincere appreciation to the Parent-Teacher Association 
for their loyal support of the high school orchestra. 

The co-operation of the school department and the towns- 
people has contributed to the success of this program, and it 
has been appreciated. 

Charles K. Yeremian 

Art 

High school art students have had an opportunity to 
develop creative ability and to improve their techniques. Ad- 
vanced problems in design, composition and color have been 



—128— 

worked out as a basis for posters, layouts, illustrations and 
portraits. Several graduates have been sending back their 
work for criticism. 

The elementary work has served to stimulate the imagi- 
nation through free expression. A nev/ course of study for 
Grades 1-12 provides a transition from informal work in the 
grades to individual projects in high school. 

Many Acton School posters have been awarded prizes by 
the Massachusetts S. P. C. A. and by the Acton Center 
Woman's Club. An exhibit was held in the high school in 
April. The Art Department provided the new Honor Roll of 
former students in the service, which hangs in the corridor. 

Among the needs of the department are reference books, 
a special supply cabinet for large materials, and a spray gun. 
Students with special skill should have additional periods. 

Constance Russo 

Home Economics Department 

The Home Economics Department has had several 
changes this year. In September the lunch room was allotted 
surplus commodities by the government. This allowed for 
larger servings at the same price. A paid assistant helps in 
the lunch preparation and in cleaning-up after lunch. This 
is a great improvement as it gives the teacher more time for 
her classes and the classes more time for actual class work. 

The penny niilk program has been introduced into the 
high school as well as the elementary schools. Under this pro- 
gram the student pays only Ic. for a half-pint of milk. The 
balance is paid partly by the government and partly by a local 
sponsor. The high school milk is sponsored by the lunch room. 
This program is made possible for us because of the use of 
surplus commodities. 

In the sewing classes the work is carried on as usual with 
the exeception of particular emphasis upon remodeling old 



! 



—129— 

garments. With much of our materials going into war uses 
it is important to be able to use outmoded clothes by making 
new ones from them. 

Financial^ Report for 19 U2 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1942 $ 11.03 

Sales for 1942 1567.43 

Expenses for 1942 $1567.17 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1943 11.29 



$1578.46 $1578.46 

* Rebecca Bartlett 
Industrial Arts 

In this present emergency when so much depends upon 
industry and our armed forces, it is necessary to train our 
youth to take their places in the long and hard struggle ahead. 
Shop courses are directly beneficial in the training of our boys 
and girls to be of service. 

Grade 7 is an introductory course in which as many types 
of shop work as possible, or advisable, are given to act as a 
background for future shop courses. Some of the types are 
drawing, woodworking and metal working. 

Grade 8 is an exploratory and discovery course in which 
the student with one year of shop work begins to see possibil- 
ities and design projects of his own. Electricity and light 
machine work are added to the seventh grade courses, which 
are continued. The electricity consists of bell wiring, wire 
splicing, extension cord construction and the making of one 
or more electrical projects. The machine work consists of 
learning the use and care of the less dangerous machines such 
as the drill press, scroll saw, and the lathe. Projects consist 
of electric lamps, small tables, what-not shelves and many 
other desirable objects. 

Grade 9 begins with an extensive mechanical drawing 
course for the purpose of teaching the use of the instruments 



—130— 

and equipment neceessary to make a good working drawing. 
Following the drawing course is a course in home mechanics 
which teaches the student certain repair jobs that can be done 
about the home, such as faucet repair, care of windows and 
doors, and cement work. Three girls are enrolled. 

Grade 10 introduces development drawing of sheet metal 
projects. This consists of the drawing of the flat pattern of 
such objects as cones, funnels, boxes, pipes, and many other 
things made of sheet metal. After the drawing of a project 
is completed, it is made, primarily for the purpose of teaching 
the use and care of sheet metal and the sheet metal equipment. 

Grade 11 introduces machine or architectural drawing. 
The machine drawing consists of the drawing of metal objects 
that may be made or worked on, in the machine shop, such as 
spindles, pulleys and castings. The architectural drawing 
consists of the study of and drawing of house plans. Power 
machine work is emphasized and larger projects such as 
tables, book cases and metal lathe projects are made. 

Grade 12 students choose any branch of shop work that 
they wish. Many times they select the type of work that they 
are preparing to follow as their vocation. Some types are 
electricity, machine shop, woodworking, and topographical 
and aircraft drawing. Two girls are taking this course. 

Safety is stressed as of primary importance, and, to 
insure this, students are taught that they should never use a 
tool or a machine until they have been instructed as to its use 
and care. Each class is organized with a shop management 
plan in which the supervisor and other monitors are respon- 
sible to the instructor. This teaches them responsibility as 
well as aiding the safety program. All students are required 
to have an approved plan before a project may be started, 
thus saving time and material. Many students work in the 
shop during spare periods and after school. 

Although the shop is fairly well equipped with tools and 
materials, any additional equipment would certainly pay 



—131— 

dividends in the experience of those who take the shop course. 

New books and magazines have been added to the shop 
library, thus aiding in the ever-broadening shop curriculum. 

Recommendations for shop improvement: 

1. Double period classes. 

2. Improved lighting. 

3. Additional power metal-working machines. 

4. An improved metal lathe. 

5. An improved grinder. 

6. A blue printing machine. 

7. Consideration of pre-induction training courses for 
juniors and seniors. 

In closing, I wish to thank the school committee and the 
townspeople for the kind consideration and co-operation that 
I have received, and state that any suggestions for shop im- 
provement would be gladly received. 

Wilbert Hayes 

A strong spirit of co-operation exists in the entire school 
department and good morale is observed in all buildings. I 
want to thank the townspeople for their generous support 
and the school committee for its sympathetic consideration of 
school problems in a war year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD B. GREENMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



■132— 



School Membership and Attendance 

Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1942 
Boys 

Grade 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Totals 



1 


4 23 


2 


















29 


2 


5 17 


2 
















24 


3 




5 


8 


3 


1 












17 


4 






8 10 


4 


1 










17 


5 








3 


12 


2 3 










20 


6 










6 


13 8 










27 


7 












7 16 7 


1 


1 






32 


8 












3 10 


5 


2 






20 


9 












3 


4 


5 


3 




15 


10 














3 


7 


4 




14 


11 


















8 


3 


11 


12 
















7 


9 


1 


17 


P. G. 




















1 


1 



250 



1 '>Q 
■loo 



Girls 
















Grade 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 


Totals 


1 


3 25 


3 1 










32 


2 


5 14 










19 


3 




7 13 3 1 










24 


4 




1 4 19 










24 


5 




9 14 3 










26 


6 




7 13 4 










24 


7 




4 12 1 1 










18 


8 




6 14 3 


2 








25 


9 




8 16 


7 








31 


10 




9 


10 


1 






20 


11 






3 13 


5 






21 


12 






10 


10 


1 


1 


22 

286 



Total, Boys and Girls 



536 



—134— 



Report of the School Physician 



Mr. Richard B. Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as School Physician. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed on 
November 10, 1942. 

The pre-school and diphtheria clinics were held in May 
and June. 

Extra examinations were held for those taking part in 
sports as part of physical training. 

The general physical condition of the school population is 
good. 

Respectfully submitted, ■ 

E. A. MAYELL, M.D. 



—135— 



Report of the School Nurse 



Mr. Richard Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report as school nurse since my 
appointment September 1 until December 31. The annual 
school physicals show a marked improvement in our students 
since physical education has become a regular part of our 
school curriculum. 

To date we have been quite free from communicable 
disease this year and hope to continue so. 

Due to war conditions over which we have no control we 
are unable to have the dental clinic this year, but hope the 
work may be continued soon. 

Statistical Report 

Simple dressings 135 

Pupils taken home ill 14 

Pupils taken to dentist 3 

Pupils taken to doctor from school . . 4 

Pupil inspections 480 

School physicals with Dr. Mayell .... 530 

Audiometer tests 524 

Audiometer re-tests 98 

At this time may I express my gratitude for your hearty 
co-operation and that of the teachers, and my appreciation 
for the support of the Parent-Teachers Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F. TAYLOR, R. N. 



I 



—136— 

ACTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Graduation Program 

Friday, June 12, 1942 
High School Auditorium at 8:00 P.M. 

E^ntrance March of Seniors 

'Tomp and Circumstance" Elyar 

Invocation 

The Reverend D. Edw^ard O'Bryan 

Salutatory and Essay 

The Importance of Chemurgy Today" 
Virginia Godfrey 

Girls' Glee Club 

"Cycle of Life" Ronald-Cain 

"Fly, Singing Bird" EUjar 

Essay — "The Power of Music" 

Florence Lawson 

Presentation of Glass Gift 

Dorothy Curley 
President of Senior Class 

Essay — "The Bottlnecks of War Industries" 

Geraldene Clapp 

Valedictory 

Helen Bjorklund 

Class Song Florence Lawson 

Presentation of Awards 

Supt. Richard B. Greenman 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Miss Fannie E. Davis 

Finale March — "Priests' March" Mendelssohn 

Reception to Graduates 



—137— 
Graduates, 1942 



I 



Henry EugeneBursaw, Jr. 

'"Helen Anna Bjorklund 

*Geraldene Clapp 

^Dorothy Marie Curley 
Michael Gibbons Curley 
Laura Blanche Biggs 
William Gerard Feely 
Kathryn Ellen Flagg 
Betsey Scott Flangan 
F. Maurice Foote 
Margaret Ellen Eraser 

*Virginia Claire Godfrey 
Barbara Mae Go wen 
Evelyn Esther Greene 

*Honor Students 



* Clare Brunswicke Howard 
^Florence Catherine Lawson 

George Waldo Livermore, Jr. 

Raymond McAvenia 

Burton Atwood Merriam 

Muriel Blanche Pelley 

Edward Leonard Pendergast, J. 

Robert Williams Rimbach 

Katherine Schofield 

Martha May Sheehan 

Paul Justin Sweeney 
"^'Geraldine Lorinda Tracy 

Gladys Elaine Wamboldt 
"^Burton Howard Wayne 



Awards During Year : 

Virginia Godfrey and George Livermore: American 
Legion Awards for best rank in Scholarship, Loyalty, and 
Achievement (Edwards-Quimby Post). 
Helen Bjorklund: Washington-Franklin Medal for best 
records in American History (Massachusetts Society, 
Sons of the American Revolution. 



-ISO- 



INDEX 



Assessors 50 

Board of Health 53 

Cemetery Commissioners 45 

Dog Officer 74 

Elizabeth White Fund 59 

Finance Committee 69 

Fire Department 60 

Forest Warden 61 

Inspector of Animals 51 

Middlesex County Extension Service 47 

Moth Control 73 

Sealer's Report 46 

Selectmen's Report 13 

State Election, November 3, 1942 26 

Schools : 

Budget for 1943 116 

Graduation Program 136 

Organization 109 

School Committee 114 

School Nurse 135 

School Physician 134 

Superintendent 119 

Teachers 113 

Special Town Meeting (Abstract), May 4, 1942 23 



—140— 

Special Town Meeting (Abstract), Nov. 23, 1942 25 

Superintendent of Streets 56 

Librarian's Report 49 

Tax Collector 63 

Town Accountant 83 

Town Clerk's Report 32 

Births 33 

Marriages 36 

Deaths 40 

Non-Resident Burials 41 

Dog Licenses 43 

Jury List (Revised) 1942 44 

Town Forest Committee 62 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 9, 1942 15 

Town Nurse 55 

Town Officers 7 

Treasurer's Report 75 

Tree Warden 72 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 52 

Police 58 

Public Welfare 56 

Warrant, Monday, March 1, 1943 3 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 48 



i 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 

1943 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 

1943 



WAKEFIELO 



-3— 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the 
transaction of town affairs, to meet in their respective pre- 
cincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the sixth day of March, 1944, 
by posting a copy of this warrant by you attested, at each 
of the places as directed by vote of the town, seven days 
at least before the sixth day of March. To bring in their 
votes on one ballot for the following town officers: 



— 4— 

Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of 
taxes, one selectman for three years ; one assessor for three 
years; one member of the board of public welfare for 
three years; four constables for one year; one cemetery 
commissioner for three* years ; two members of the school 
committee for three years; one member of the board of 
health for three years; one trustee Memorial Library for 
three years; one trustee Memorial Library for one year to 
fill vacancy; and a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o^clock noon, and close 
at 8 o'clock p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Com- 
monwealth to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, 
as aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall in said Acton, on 
Monday, the thirteenth day of March, at 7.30 o'clock, p. m., 
then and there to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and 
committees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committee chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

Article 4. To see what sum of money the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and 
usual expenses of the several departments of the town and 
determine how the same shall be raised. 

Article 5. To see what sum of money the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memo- 
rial Day. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, 



— 5— 

to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1944, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and ^ 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The town will 
be reimbursed for the amount spent by the County of Mid- 
dlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $100.00 for the maintenance of 
Jones Community Field, South Acton, or act anything there- 
on. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$750.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Ac- 
count, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 or any other sum to be used 
by the Town Forest Committee for the purpose of purchas- 
ing additional forest land or act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the work of the Post- 
war Public Works Committee, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150.00 for repairs to the town 
sprayer, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Public Welfare to employ a person from the 
Civil Service list for the administration of Old Age Assist- 
ance, Aid to Dependent Children and General Relief in 
Acton, or act anything thereon. 



— 6— 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 to defray the necessary 
expenses of the person employed by the Board of Public 
Welfare in the administration of Old Age Assistance, Aid 
to Dependent Children and General Relief, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1500.00 for power metal-working 
machines in the high school shop, as recommended in the 
report last year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $277.88, as required by law, to be 
paid to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement Board on 
account of teachers on leave of absence for military service, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1500.00 to install fluorescent light- 
ing fixtures in all elementary classrooms or act anything 
thereon. 

Articlel8. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1500.00 for a new high school roof 
covering or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Selectmen to have an annual audit of the 
various accounts of the town or act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1800.00 so that the Board of Health 
may renew the contract for the collection and disposal of 
garbage for the period of one year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $375.00 for the installation of two 
overhead doors in the Acton Center Fire house and for the 



— 7— 

painting of the Acton Center and South Acton Fire houses 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
By-Laws of the Town of Acton, adopted on March 8, 1926, 
by adding at the end of Article 1 of Section 1, the follow- 
ing: The members of the Board of Selectmen, Board of 
Assessors, Board of Public Welfare, School Committee and 
the Board of Health, are to be equally represented from 
each of the three existing precincts, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to appropri- 
ate the sum of $2000.00 from the Overlay Surplus as a Re- 
serve Fund or act anything thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will appropriate from 
the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the State's and 
County's allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 
90, provided that the reimbursement from the State and 
County be credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid 
bills for 1943 or do or act anything thereon. 

Fire Department $208.30 

Forest Fires 130.10 

Snow Account 28.75 

Board of Health 26.00 



$393.15 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 



— 8— 

with your doings thereon to the town clerk at or before the 
time of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this twelfth day of 
January, 1944. 

ARTHUR W. LEE, 
GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

A true copy. Attest: 

ROBERT G. WILLETT, 

Constable of Acton. 



— 9— 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Moderator 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

George A. Morse Town expires 1944 

Arthur W. Lee Term expires 1945 

George S. Braman Term expires 1946 

Town Clerk 

Harlan E. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1944 

Clare A. Milbery Term expires 1945 

Carl C. Flint Term expires 1946 

Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Raymond L. Hatch Term expires 1944 

Benjamin J. Ineson Term expires 1945 

Mary M. Laff in Term expires 1946 

Constables 

Samuel E. Knowlton Robert G. Willett 

Ivar Peterson Lawrence Roche 



—10— 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1944 

Ray L. Harris Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

School Committee 

Walter B. Stevens Term expires 1944 

Margaret Fraser . .Term expires 1944 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1945 

Robert C. Hall Term expires 1945 

Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Marion C. Reed Term expires 1946 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1944 

Frank A. Merriam Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle .Term expires 1946 

Board of Health 

Francis B. Whouley Term expires 1944 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1945 

O. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1946 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1944 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1945 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1946 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1944 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1945 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1946 



—11— 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1944 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1945 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1946 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1944 

Charlotte Conant Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN — 1943 

Executive Clerk 

Virginia Milbery 

Office : Town Hall Hours : 8 A. M. to 4 5- M. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30 

Board of Public Welfare, Tuesday evenings at 7 :00. 

Finance Conunittee 

W. Stuart Allen Henry E. Tolman 

Alden C. Flagg Albert W. Locke 

William T. Merriam Porter G. Jenks 

Superintendent of Streets 

William C. Kazokas 

Town Accountant 

Howard L. Jones Term expires 1944 

Registrars of Voters 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1944 

William B. Feely Term expires 1945 

James W. Coughlin Term expires 1946 

Harlan E. Tuttle Ex-Officio 



—12— 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — Alice C. Duren 
Clerk — James A. Wayne 
Inspector — Samuel E. Knowlton 
Inspector — Paul A. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — Gertrude M. O'Neil 
Deputy Clerk — Spencer H. Taylor 
Deputy Inspector — Ralph L. Rogers 
Deputy Inspector — Leo T. McCarthy 
Teller — Louisa N. Wood 
Teller — Mary L. FitzGibbon 

Precinct II 
Warden — Clarence Robbins 
Clerk — Grace J. Cullinane 
Inspector — Merle M. Hayward 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — Pauline Bursaw 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas M. Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Henry L. Capelle 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph H. Lemoine 
Teller — Marion L. Piper 
Teller — John J. Bradley 

Precinct III 
Warden — Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Charles A. Byron 
Inspector — Havelock J. Schnair 
Inspector — Mary M. Laffin 
Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk — Albert C. Gravlin 
Deputy Inspector — Harry E. Holt 
Deputy Inspector — Katherine M. Kinsley 
Teller — Margaret F. Leveroni 
Teller — Marion C. Reed 



—13— 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 

Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Carl E. Anderson 

Town Forest Committee 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1944 

James J. Knight Term expires 1945 

Albert R. Jenks Term expires 1946 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Oliver D. Wood Charles E. Smith 

Field Drivers 

Norman E. Livermore Robert G. Willett 

Norman L. Perkins 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James J. Knight 

Police Officers 

*Michael Foley, Chief 
Robert G. Willett Benjamin Sawyer 

Louis Leveroni Samuel Knowlton 

* Civil Service — Permanent 



—14— 

Burial Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 

.Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 

Ralph Jones 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 

Howard L. Jones 

Public Weighers 

William Braman Alfred Davis, Jr. 

A. W. Davis G. Howard Reed 

M. B. Ferber W. H. Francis Davis 

Philip Newell Thomas Hearon 

Willard Houghton Fred Stone 

W. H. Soar Albert S. Braman 

Peter Olsen, Jr. Harold Whitney 

Charles Clark William Kane 

Charles Claflin Edward Hellier 

John William Davis Roland Priest 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 

We submit, herewith, the reports of the various depart- 
ments of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1943; 
also a report of the action taken on all articles submitted to 
the voters at the regular and special town meetings. 

Shortly after the annual town meeting, the Boston & 
Maine Railroad stated that they wished to replace a steel 
girder in the South Acton railroad bridge. This necessitated 
that the bridge planking be removed and replaced with new 
material after the steel work was completed. It cost the 
town approximately $800 to do this. 



—15— 

During the year, a new cement apron was installed 
along the east side of the town hall. A coal chute was 
placed in the foundation wall and a cement floor was laid 
in a part of the cellar. New overhead doors have been in- 
stalled at the South Acton fire station and we recommend 
new doors be installed at the Acton Center fire house this 
coming year. 

After filing a number of applications and making sev- 
eral personal calls for the new ladder truck, which was 
voted on at the annual town meeting in 1941, a release was 
finally granted and the new ladder truck was delivered to 
the Town of Acton and put into service on September 11, 
1943. We feel that this piece of apparatus completes the 
requirements for the fire protection of the town. 

Due to the fact that no money was allotted to the town 
for new road construction, a regular program of mainten- 
ance was followed. 

The Board of Selectmen was asked to serve on a Roll 
of Honor committee along with six other citizens of the town. 
Necessary plans and details were arranged and on November 
28, the Roll of Honor was presented to the town by Mr. Her- 
bert Leusher and accepted by Chairman of the Selectmen, 
George A. Morse. 

In the middle of December, Chairman Morse asked for 
a leave of absence, as he had entered the Armed Forces of 
his country. The board regretted to have him leave, but he 
did what he thought was his duty. Since it was so close to the 
end of the year, the two remaining members decided to carry 
on until the annual election. 

The board wishes, at this time, to express its apprecia- 
tion to all town officers and committees for their co-opera- 
tion in carrying out the duties of their respective offices dur- 
ing the past year. 

ARTHUR W. LEE, 
GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



—16— 
TOWN MEETINGS 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 8, 1943 



Art. 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose Charlotte Conant trustee of the Elizabeth White 
Fund for three years. 

Chose James B. Wilson trustee of the West Acton Fire- 
men's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Herbert W. Merriam trustee of the Acton Fire- 
men's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose Horace F. Tuttle trustee of the Goodnow Fund 
for three years. 

Voted : That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
thousand dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Select- 
men be three hundred dollars per annum and the other mem- 
bers two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted : That the salaries of the Assessors be nine hun- 
dred dollars in the aggregate per annum to be apportioned 
as they may determine. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk fifteen 
dollars and the other member ten dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per annum and that of the other members seventy-five dol- 
lars each per annum and that a member of the Board of Pub- 



—17— 

lie Welfare shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assistance 
and that the expense of administering this assistance such 
as necessary supplies, salary and traveling expense of said 
supervisor shall not exceed the amount provided for this pur- 
pose by the Federal Government. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen 
dollars for the annual meeting and ten dollars for special 
meetings. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Clerk be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be six 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Accountant be 
six hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to fix the 
salaries of all other town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the sev- 
eral reports of the town officers. 

Voted : To accept the several reports of town officers. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

The Selectmen made a report on the purchase of a new 
fire truck for South Acton. Due to war conditions they were 
not able to purchase a new truck and the report was accepted 
as a report of progress. 

No action was taken under this article. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and deter- 
mine how the same shall be raised. 



—18— 

Under this and other articles in the warrant it was voted 
to appropriate and raise by taxation for : 

Highways, Village $ 450.00 

Highways, Chapter 81 6,000.00 

Highways, Chapter 90 1,500.00 

General Government 7,700.00 

Bonds (town officers) 275.00 

Notes and Bonds 2,000.00 

Buildings and Grounds 2,000.00 

Police Department 

Chiefs Salary 1,800.00 

Assistant's Salary (1st 3 mos.) 387.50 

Expenses and Operating Cruiser 960.00 

Chiefs War Bonus (9 mos.) 225.00 

Fire Department 2,700.00 

Forest Fires 700.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department 1,000.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Health Department 1,000.00 

Town Nurse and Expenses 2,100.00 

Snow Removal 6,000.00 

Street Lighting . 3,750.00 

Public Welfare 2,500.00 

Veterans' Benefits 4,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children . 1,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 21,000.00 

Department of Education, Schools 58,000.00 

Library, Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library, Books 200.00 

Cemeteries 2,800.00 

Liability Insurance 700.00 

Memorial Day, Art. 5 250.00 

Expense of Dog Officer, Art. 8 200.00 

Work Relief, Art. 7 25.00 

Jones Community Field, Art. 9 100.00 

Unclassified 650.00 



—19— 

Interest on Notes and Bonds " 345.00 

Interest on Revenue Loans 75.00 

Town Forest Committee, Art. 12 500.00 

Reserve Fund from Overlay Surplus Acct. . . . 2,000.00 

Rationing, Art. 15 1,300.00 

Spotting Tower 50.00 

Committee on Public Safety 250.00 

Transfer from Machinery Fund to Machinery 

Account, Art. 10 500.00 

Disposal of Garbage, Art. 13 2,000.00 



$144,445.50 

Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial 
Day. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars for the observance of Memorial Day. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1943, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 
44, General Laws. 

Voted unanimously : That the town treasurer, with the 
approval of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1943, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money for the Work Relief Fund, or act 
anything thereon. 



—20— 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of twenty- 
five dollars for the Work Relief Fund. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $200.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The town will 
be reimbursed for the amount spent by the County of Mid- 
dlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred (200) dollars for the use of the treasurer, to pay the 
expenses of the local dog officer. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $100.00 for the maintenance of Jones 
Community Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate one hundred (100) 
dollars for the maintenance of Jones Community Field, 
South Acton. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$500.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Ac- 
count, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer five hundred (500) dollars from 
the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will adopt Section 38A, 
Chapter 41, General Laws relative to Town Collector or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the use of the Town 
Forest Committee or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 
for the use of the Town Forest Committee. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to defray the cost of collection 



—21— 

and disposal of garbage throughout the town or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of 
($2000.00) two thousand dollars for the collection and dis- 
posal of garbage throughout the town, the said sum to be 
expended under the direction of the Board of Health. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money sufficient to insure the com- 
pressed air tanks and steam boilers of the three fire stations 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the expenses of the Ra- 
tioning Board or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of 
($1300.00) thirteen hundred dollars for the expenses of the 
Rationing Board. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will accept Section lOOA, 
Chapter 41, General Laws relative to indemnification of 
officers or employees for damages, etc., incurred on account 
of injuries arising out of their operation of publicly owned 
motor vehicles, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To accept Section lOOA, Chapter 41, General 
Laws. 

Voted : To adjourn. 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SPECIAL 
TOWN MEETING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1943 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $650.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
Buildings and Grounds account or act anything thereon. 



—22— 

Voted : To transfer the sum of Six Hundred Fifty 
($650.00) dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
Buildings and Grounds Account. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $400.00 from 'the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
Forest Fire Account or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of Four Hundred ($400.00) 
dollars be transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Forest Fire Account. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $500.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
account of the Fire Department or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of Five Hundred ($500.00) 
dollars be transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Fire Department Account. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $800.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
account for Aid to Dependent Children or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of Eight Hundred ($800.00) 
dollars be transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Account for Aid to Dependent Children. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $300.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
account of the Rationing Board or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of Three Hundred ($300.00) 
dollars be transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account 
to the Account of the Rationing Board. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will appoint a commit- 
tee to work in conjunction with the Emergency Public 
Works Commission in preparing a program of Post-War 
Readjustment or act anything thereon. 



—23— 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of 
three to work in conjunction with the Emergency Public 
Works Commission in preparing a program of Post-War Re- 
adjustment. 

Committee appointed by the moderator, Albert R. 
Jenks, Richard F. Deane and Forrest E. Bean, Sr. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $50.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
account of Interest on Revenue Loans or act anything there- 
on. 

Voted: That the sum of Fifty ($50.00) dollars be 
transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account to the Ac- 
count of Interest on Revenue Loans. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $600.00 from the Surplus Revenue Account to the 
Account of the Board of Health or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the sum of Six Hundred ($600.00) dol- 
lars be transferred from the Surplus Revenue Account to 
the Account of the Board of Health to be used for an extra 
Town Nurse as the demand requires. 

This is to be a war measure for the duration of the war 
only. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



—24— 
TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Births 

Whole number recorded 58 

Born in Acton 3 Native parentage 50 

Males 38 Foreign parentage .... 1 

Females 20 Mixed parentage .... 7 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 24 

Resident of Acton .... 26 Residents of other places 22 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 39 

Resident of Acton .... 36 Residents of other places 3 

Occurring in Acton . . 26 Occurring in other places 13 

Average age in years, 71 plus 



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-SI- 



DEATHS REGISTERED IN 1943 



Date Name 

Oct. 30 Battles, Oliver Belcher 

Sept. 9 Bengston, Nils 

Feb. 14 Boynton, John W. 

Feb. 20 Bradley, Bernice M. 

May 6 Bulette, Frank W. 

May 4 Cheney, Frances B. 

Jan. 15 Cobb, Abbott Leslie 

Sept. 1 Connor, Thomas L. 

Jan. 17 Crowfoot, Martha A. (McNeill) 

Dec. 26 Davis, William Henry Francis 

Jan. 16 Durkee, Clark G. 

Dec. 15 Durkee, Mabel C. 

Mar. 12 Farrand, William Henry 

July 14 Gallant, Joseph 

Jan. 29 Gates, Nellie E. (Wilson) 

May 7 Graves, David B. 

Feb. 26 Haase, Louise A. Brown 

Dec. 17 Haney, John 

Dec. 27 Hartwell, Cora B. 

Oct. 20 Holbrook, Nellie 

Oct. 31 Kilgallon, Daniel E. 

Mar. 26 Kinsley, James 

Oct. 16 Kohlrausch, George William 

Aug. 11 LaRoche, Lewis Arthur 

Jan. 2 MacConnell, George V. 

Oct. 2 McAvoy, Mary J. 

June 10 Merriam, Frank A. 

April 30 Morrison, Catherine M. (Jenkins) 

Feb. 28 Parker, George Maynard 

May 11 Peters, Frank Reed 

Dec. 19 Prowse, Florence E. 

Oct. 8 Rich, Earl Clifton 



Y. 


M. 


D. 


88 





12 


80 






74 


8 


8 


39 


2 


5 


72 


8 


7 


72 





25 


78 


2 


17 


61 


10 


27 


75 


4 


18 


66 


2 


2 


87 


4 


20 


79 


10 


13 


83 


11 


10 


75 


8 


24 


65 




15 


87 


6 


20 


77 


10 


5 


67 


10 


27 


90 


7 


6 


82 


5 


21 


68 


10 


10 


86 


11 


26 


87 


11 


19 


71 





30 


50 


10 


19 


72 


10 


8 


73 





21 


71 


1 


20 


86 


7 


4 


76 


2 


14 


74 


4 


28 


53 


1 


17 



—32- 



Sept. 


5 


Robbins, Bessie Etta 


78 


2 


29 


Sept. 


24 


Shea, Peter J. 




74 


6 


7 


Jan. 


25 


Sheehan, Susan M. 


(Falls) 


53 


8 


12 


July 


31 


Tracy, Mabel A. 




1 


6 


12 


Mar. 


25 


Troupe, Nellie 




53 


11 


10 


Oct. 


15 


Whitcomb, Lucy C. 




80 


4 


22 


Aug. 


5 


Young, Ray C. 




67 


9 


3 



—33- 



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—35— 
DOG LICENSES 



282 Licenses at $2.00 $564.00 

56 Licenses at $5.00 280.00 

1 License at $50.00 50.00 

$894.00 

Deduct fees 339 Licenses at 20 cents . . 67.80 



Paid to the Town Treasurer $826.20 

Notice 

All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the 
owners or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of the time of year ownership is acquired. No 
tax bills are sent to owmers of dogs. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



—36— 
JURY LIST REVISED — 1943 



Precinct 1 

Clarence Frost — Newtown Rd. 
James W. Coughlin — Cen. Main St. 
George E. Horton, Jr. — Cen. Main St. 
Forrest E. Bean — Cen. Main St. 
Arthur Freese — Wetherbee St. 
Samuel E. Knovs^lton — Hosmer St. 
Roy H. Linscott — Great Rd. 
Elwin H. Hollowell — Wheeler Lane. 
Foster R. MacKinnon — Esterbrook Rd. 

Precinct 2 

Richard Lowden — Main St. 
James J. Knight — School St. 
Timothy J. Hennessey — Prospect St. 
Ralph W. Piper — Piper Rd. 
Otis J. Reed — Prospect St. 
Ralph H. Littlefield— Main St. 
Edward LeClerc — Piper Rd. 
Llewellyn Fullonton — Piper Rd. 
David F. Penney — Robbins St. 

Precinct 3 

Waldo J. Flint — Windsor Ave. 

Louis A. Flerra — Central St. 

Warren L. Davis — Massachusetts Ave. 

Ernest G. Banks — Massachusetts Ave. 

A. Leslie Harris — Willow St. 

Lester A. Sebastian — Massachusetts Ave. 

Bertram D. Hall — Windsor Ave. 

Albert W. Locke— Willow St. 

Warren H. Liese — Massachusetts Ave. 



—37— 
REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



We have endeavored another year to maintain the high 
standard of the past in the care of our cemeteries. 

The account of the town treasurer shows that during 
the past year the cemetery department has received and 
paid into the treasury $1556.40 itemized as follows: 

Annual care of lots $661.00 

Burials 468.00 

Lowering device 81.00 

Sale of lots 120.00 

Foundations 180.40 

Miscellaneous 46.00 



$1,556.40 



We ask that these receipts may be considered in mak- 
ing your appropriation for the current year. 

We recommend an appropriation for the care of 
cemeteries of $2,800.00. 

An itemized account of the expenditures for the care of 
the cemeteries will be found in the report of the town ac- 
countant. 

There has been added to the perpetual care account the 
past year, in new accounts the sum of $1,400.00. 

We have prepared a schedule of the receipts and ex- 
penditures on account of each lot under perpetual care, in 
books kept for that purpose, which may be examined by 
persons interested. 

HARRY E. HOLT, 
RAY L. HARRIS, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



— SB- 
REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The following is the report of your Sealer of Weights 
and Measures for the year 1943 : 

During the year I sealed 289 weighing and measuring 
devices and condemned one. You will note that this shows 
a decrease of the preceding year due to a number of gas 
stations discontinuing on account of the war. 

The State Department of Standards again loaned the 
equipment to check the oil tank meter systems, thereby sav- 
ing our merchants' time and money by not having to go out 
of town to have this test made. 

Fees collected and turned over to the town treasurer 
were $64.52. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. ANDERSON, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

EXTENSION SERVICE DONE IN THE TOWN 

OF ACTON FOR 1943. 



Because of war conditions, the Staff of the Extension 
Service had to devote a great deal of time this year to over- 
head organization work pertaining to machinery rationing, 
food distribution orders, farm labor and other regulations, 
as issued by our Government, and establishing the number 
of war units on certain farms for Selective Service Boards. 
An attempt was made to see to it that these regulations 
were explained and applied to local conditions. 



—39— 

Agricultural work within the town had to do with 
information on poultry diseases and range improvement, 
assistance to dairymen in the control of mastitis and the 
furnishing of various market information as it pertained 
to milk, ceiling prices on poultry, and the feed situation. 

The establishment of a locker storage plant by A. R. 
Jenks is filling a long felt need and is of definite value to 
farmers and homemakers. 

The promotion of victory gardens was carried on in a 
general way, with talks given before the Garden Club, 
High School Agricultural Club, and home visits. 

Of interest to the homemakers was a series of meet- 
ings on the making of coats in South Acton, canning dem- 
onstrations in Acton Center and West Acton, and the show- 
ing of suggestions for home-made Christmas gifts. 

Acton is one of the leading towns in 4-H Club Work 
and this past year 201 boys and girls were enrolled in eight 
different projects. Mrs. Warren Hartwell served as 4-H 
Club Chairman and leaders assisting were Mrs. Kenneth 
Jewell, Mrs. Albert Durkee, Mrs. Howard Billings, Mrs. 
Charles Vose, Mrs. Giovanna Melise, Miss Ruth Berg- 
lund, Mrs. Edith Bird, Miss Alice Feehan, Mrs. John 
Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn Allen, Miss Barbara Barry, 
Walter Liebfred and Reverend Lynne P. Townsend. Miss 
Grace Callanan was Secretary and Richard Greenman, 
Treasurer of the Committee. An exhibit showing the re- 
sults of the winter projects was held in the spring, along 
with the school exhibit. A second exhibit was held in the 
fall, showing the results of the garden and canning clubs. 
Miss Barbara Barry was state winner in the State Food 
Demonstration Contest and won a fifty dollar War Bond. 
Dawn and Beverley Dagenais were awarded a ten dollar 
prize by the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agricul- 
ture for their work in the poultry club. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Director. 



—40— 
REPORT OF WORKMEN^S COMPENSATION AGENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

There were two slight accidents to town employees 
during the past year. Both were taken care of properly. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Compensation Agent. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT — 1943 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the Library, Jan- 
uary 1, 1943, 21,766. Increase by purchase, 285. Increase 
by gift, 69. Total increase, 354. Withdrawn from circu- 
lation, 250. Total number of volumes in the Library, Jan- 
uary 1, 1944, 21,870. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was opened, 
103. 

Number of volumes circulated, 8,155. 

Largest daily circulation, 133 ; March 13. 

Sroallest daily circulation, 29; December 11. 

Daily average circulation, 79 plus. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and 
paid to Town Treasurer, $41.94. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : State of Massachusetts, 6 ; Smithsonian Institu- 
tion, 1 ; Anon, 1 ; Hoover Library, 1 ; Major Edward Bowes, 
1; New York Trust Co., 1; Charlotte Conant, 2; Kent 
Cooper, 1 ; Mrs. Burton Harvey, 4 ; George Horton, 1 ; 
Alfred V. Jules, 1 ; Mrs. Louis Jones, 1 ; Mrs. Hobart Mead, 
4; Mildred Pope Moore, 39; Ralph W. Piper, Jr., 2 ; H. F. 
Tuttle, 1; F. S. Whitcomb, 1; Mrs. Walters, 1. Total, 69. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



—41— 

REPORT OF THE POST-WAR PUBLIC WORKS 
COMMITTEE 



The Committee has met several times, one time with 
the Executive Secretary of the State Emergency Commis- 
sion of Public Works, at which meeting there were sev- 
eral members of the Town's Official Family present to dis- 
cuss plans with Mr. Nichols. 

After considering projects suggested to us, we have 
several plans ready for use, in case of the emergency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, Chairman 
FOREST E. BEAN, Sr. 
RICHARD F. DEANE, Secretary 



ASSESSORS* REPORT — 1943 



Tax assessed as follows: 

Buildings, exclusive of land $2,573,800.00 

Land 632,555.00 

Personal 418,550.00 

$3,624,905.00 

Valuation January 1, 1942 . . 3,608,295.00 

Increase in valuation 16,610.00 

Rate of Taxation, $28.40 

Real Estate $ 91,060.50 

Personal Estate 11,886.86 

Polls 1,628.00 

$104,575.36 



-42- 



Amount of money raised : 

State Tax $ 3,100.00 

State Parks Tax 93.15 

County Tax 4,410.69 

Tuberculosis Hosp. Assess- 
ment 1,076.28 

Town Grant 92,739.56 

Overlay 3,155.68 

: $104,575.36 

Added Assessments: 

Polls 50.00 

Excise — 1942 10.92 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise: 

Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1074 
Total Value of Motor Vehicles 

and Trailers $168,859.00 

Rate of Excise, $36.33 

Total Excise $5,856.38 

ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
CLARE A. MILBERY, 
CARL C. FLINT, 

Board of Assessors 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for 
the year 1943: 

Dog-bites 13 

Rabies 

It was advised again this year by the Livestock Disease 
Control not to make the annual barn inspection. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



—43— 

REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1943 



INVESTMENTS 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank $ 465.54 

U. S. Savings Bonds 3,000.00 



RECEIPTS 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank $ 20.65 

Warren Institution for Savings 14.65 

City Institution for Savings . . 7.50 

U. S. War Bonds 37.50 



PAYMENTS 

Harlan E. Tuttle, Treasurer of 

the Evangelical Church in 

Acton $60.30 

Town of Acton, care of lot in 

Woodlawn Cemetery .... 20.00 



$3,465.54 



$80.30 



$80.30 



CHARLOTTE CONANT, 
CHARLES E. SMITH, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



—44— 
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The Board of Health herewith submits the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1943. 

There has been no run of communicable diseases dur- 
ing the past year, although there were a few cases of scar- 
let fever reported, but they were kept within the immedi- 
ate families which were scattered in different sections of 
the town. 

The diphtheria clinic was sponsored by the Board 
again this year under the direction of the school doctor, E. 
A. Mayell, M. D. and Lillian Taylor, R. N. The number 
of children given the Schick Test was 68. We cannot im- 
press too strongly the value of this clinic to each and every 
family. 

At the last town meeting it was voted to raise and ap- 
propriate $2,000.00 to defray the cost of the collection and 
disposal of garbage and to place the matter in the hands 
of the Board of Health. The Board advertised in all the 
local newspapers for bids to be opened April 27, 1943 and 
awarded the contract to the lowest bidder, Frederick K. 
Johnson of Lexington at $1,560.00 for one year ending 
May 1, 1944. We feel that the efficient and courteous 
service rendered by Mr. Johnson and his employees war- 
rants a continuation of this service. 

At the beginning of the fall school term it was deemed 
advisable to take some action regarding the duties of the 
Town Nurse. Due to the shortage of doctors in the town 
there are many more calls for her services, besides her 
usual duties and being on call twenty-four hours a day she 
has been greatly overworked. In the event of an epidemic 
of colds, flu, or any other communicable disease it would 
be impossible for her to attend all the necessary calls. We, 



—45— 

therefore, requested the selectmen to appropriate $600.00 
as a war emergency measure for the duration to cover the 
expenses of an assistant nurse to substitute for the regu- 
lar nurse and the doctors, if and when they were not avail- 
able immediately. 

The appropriation was voted at a special town meet- 
ing in September and of this amount we have found it 
necessary to spend only $171.00, although several times the 
regular nurse, after having serv-ed a long tour of duty, re- 
sponded to calls when they should have been turned over 
to an assistant. 

We wish to thank Verne Farquhar, R. N., and Hazel 
Roche, R. N., who have co-operated untiringly and un- 
stintingly of their time whenever we felt it necessary to 
call upon them. 

In explanation of the expenditure of $109.90 for legal 
services, this was made necessary to close a piggery re- 
garding which we had had several complaints as being a 
nuisance, and although the amount seems large the case 
was in the hands of the town counsel for one year and the 
sum also includes two or three other items accumulated 
over the past three years when legal advice was sought 
and no charge had been made at the time. 

We recommend that the nurse be under the complete 
jurisdiction of this Board and an appropriation of 
$3,800.00 be granted to take care of the salaries, supplies, 
assistant nurse and other expenses of the Board. 

Record of contagious diseases Jan. 1, 1943 to Dec. 31, 
1943. 

Scarlet Fever 9 

Measles 19 

German Measles 21 

Meningitis 1 

Syphilis 2 

Dog-bite 13 

Chicken Pox 64 



—46— 

Deaths : 

Burial Permits issued 30 

Residents 26 

Residents who died in other towns 13 

Non-resident burials 3 

Total number of deaths 39 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOWELL H. CRAM, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF TOWN NURSE 



To the Board of Health, Acton, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report for the year ending Dec. 
31, 1943. Nursing services were as follows: 

Bedside Nursing 1878 

Welfare Calls 176 

Pre-natal 150 

Post-natal 118 

Home Confinements 3 

Ten cases have been X-rayed and examined at the 
Middlesex County Hospital. The hospital offers its services 
without charge in effort of early diagnosis and control of 
tuberculosis. 

Four cases were X-rayed and examined at Lakeville 
Sanatorium. 

Six patients have been taken to Emerson Hospital for 
X-rays on Blood Tests. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F. TAYLOR, R. N. 



—47— 
REPORT OF WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen : 

We respectfully submit the report of the Welfare 
Board for 1943. 

The appropriation for Welfare for 1943 was $2,500, 
out of which $2,467.81 was spent, leaving a balance of 
$32.19. During 1943, we aided two cases in Acton and 
nine cases out of town with Acton settlements. At the 
present time, we are aiding nine welfare cases, only two 
of which are in Acton. For the out-of-town bills during 
the past year, we paid $1,784.98 while $649.90 was paid 
for the two cases in Acton. In anticipation of bills which 
will be incurred during 1944, we find it necessary to ask 
for an appropriation of $3,000, which is a small increase 
over last year. 

For Aid to Dependent Children, we are asking an ap- 
propriation of $1,800, the same as was appropriated last 
year. During 1943, we aided three families having a total 
of eight dependent children. As nearly as can be foreseen, 
these cases will continue during the coming year and will 
cost approximately $2,500. Federal Grants which will be 
received by the town will cover the deficit. 

We are asking for $18,000 for Old Age Assistance 
during the coming year. This is a decrease of $3,000 over 
last year's appropriation. On January 1, 1943, our case 
load was 87 and on December 31, 1943, it had dropped to 
64. We added ten cases during the year. On September 
9, 1943, a new law was passed increasing the allotments 
allowed and establishing definite amounts which must be 
contributed by children earning certain salaries. In Acton, 
this law brought about the closing of six cases. Thirteen 



-48— 



others were closed by deaths, ten recipients moved from 
Acton, while four others secured employment. During the 
past year 97 cases were aided, 73 of which had Acton settle- 
ments, 17 with out-of-town settlements and 7 which had no 
settlements. 

Appropriations recommended for 1944: 

Old Age Assistance $18,000.00 

Temporary Aid 3,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children . 1,800.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAYMOND L. HATCH, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
BENJAMIN J. INESON, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report for the Police Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1943. 

Arrests 

Drunkenness 10 

Statutory Rape 3 

Adultery *. . 2 

Begetting 2 

Operating under the influence of liquor 4 

Violation of Fish and Game laws 4 

Assault and battery 1 

Sounding false fire alarm 2 

Violation of Executive Order No. 35 4 



-49- 



Failure to slow motor vehicle at intersection 1 

Keeping unlicensed dogs 2 

Concealing leased property 1 

Operating so as to endanger 1 

Operating without a license 1 

Larceny 1 

Vagrancy 1 

Going away after causing injury to property 1 

Motor Vehicles 

Accidents reported 8 

Persons reported injured 10 

Fatal accidents 

Registrations and Permits . . 

Bicycle Registrations issued 70 

Revolver or Pistol permits issued 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department 

for the year 1943. 

The total number of alarms responded to are as 

follows : 

Building 13 

Automobile 6 

Chimney 7 

False 2 

Out of Town 1 

Miscellaneous 7 



36 



—50— 

The new ladder truck has been received and was put 
into service at the South Acton station on September 11, 
1943. I feel we are well rewarded for our long wait, as this 
piece of apparatus is very essential and will play a very 
important part in the efficiency of the department in the 
future. 

New doors have been installed at the South Acton 
station to replace the old ones which were badly broken. 
I would like to recommend at this time, to have both South 
and Center stations painted this year and also new doors 
installed at Acton Center and to have the steam pipes and 
radiators fixed up at the West Acton station. 

Our equipment is in good condition and we are to re- 
ceive an extra pump and an amount of hose from the gov- 
ernment to be used in case of an emergency. 

There are no major expenditures that have to be made 
this year except the regular repairs and replacements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Chief Fire Department 



FOREST WARDEN'S REPORT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1943 : 

Total number of fires responded to ... . 56 

Out of town calls 

Labor cost of extinguishing $938.90 



—51— 

Although the fire season was light this year, the num- 
ber of grass fires have increased noticeably. This is due, 
in at least 75 per cent of the cases, to people burning rub- 
bish in incinerators that do not measure up to legal re- 
quirements. If this does not improve, the law on fires in 
the open air will have to be enforced. 

At the present time our forest fire equipment is in 
good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. Ma'cGREGOR, 

Forest Warden 



REPORT OF TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The Acton Town Forest Committee herewith submits 
the following report for the year 1943 : 

Your committee used the appropriation given us to 
purchase 49 acres of land in the so-called Texas section 
of town. Much of this land is covered with wood partly 
grown. There is a little wood which could be cut now if 
really needed but will be greatly improved by leaving for 
a few years. 

We have several tracts in other sections of the town 
which we are studying and would like to purchase from 
time to time as funds become available. 

We recommend an appropriation of $500.00 annually. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, Chairman 
JAMES J. KNIGHT 
CLARENCE FROST, Secretary 



—52— 
REPORT OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The Trustees have signed orders to the Treasurer for 
two hundred dollars ($200.00). 

These orders have been given after careful investi- 
gation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB 
CLARA SAWYER 
CHARLOTTE CONANT 
Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



1941 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 ; . . . $8,467.86 

Interest 526.63 



$8,994.49 

Paid Treasurer $8,915.99 

Adjustment .40 

Abated 65.32 

Tax Titles 12.78 



$8,994.49 



1942 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 $19,918.36 

Adjustment .01 

Interest 351.93 



$20,270.30 



-53— 



Paid Treasurer $13,291.87 

Tax Titles 11.36 

Abated 71.56 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 6,895.51 

$20,270.30 

1943 TOWN TAX 

Committed $91,060.50 

Interest 26.38 

$91,086.88 

Paid Treasurer $71,441.34 

Tax Titles 56.80 

Abated 1,272.88 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 18,315.86 



$91,086.88 

1941 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 $808.84 

Interest 50.57 

Overpayment 1.98 



$861.39 

Paid Treasurer $806.01 

Abated 55.38 

$861.39 

1942 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 1,104.77 

Interest 18.14 

I 

$1,122.91 

Paid Treasurer $661.76 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 461.15 

$1,122.91 



—54— 



1943 PERSONAL TAX 



Committed $11,886.86 

Interest 1.18 



$11,888.04 



Paid Treasurer $10,837.08 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 1,050.96 



$11,888.04 

1941 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 $60.00 

Interest 3.26 

Cost 7.35 

$70.61 

Paid Treasurer $60.61 

Abated 10.00 

$70.61 

1942 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1943 $298.00 

Inter^est 2.13 

Cost 15.05 

$315.18 

Paid Treasurer $117.18 

Abated 144.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 54.00 



$315.18 





55 






1943 POLL TAX 




Committed . . . . 




$1,954.00 


Interest 




11.55 










$1,965.55 


Paid Treasurer 




$1,273.55 


Abated 




508.00 


Uncollected Jan. 


1, 1944 


184.00 




$1,965.55 




1940 EXCISE TAX 




Uncollected Jan. 


1, 1943 


$26.20 




$26.20 


Abated 




26.20 










$26.20 




1941 EXCISE TAX 




Uncollected Jan. 


1, 1943 


$264.49 


Interest 




15.19 










$279.68 


Paid Treasurer 




$193.71 


Abated 




85.97 










$279.68 




1942 EXCISE TAX 




Uncollected Jan 


. 1, 1943 


$1,201.53 


Committed Jan. 


6, 1943 


10.92 


Interest 




15.13 










$1,227.58 



-56- 



Paid Treasurer 
Abated 




$718.58 
91 29 


Uncollected Jan. 


1, 1944 

1943 EXCISE TAX 


417.71 


Committed .... 


$1,227.58 
$5,856.38 


Interest 




1.74 








Paid Treasurer 
Abated 


$5,858.12 

$4,947.42 
30.97 


Uncollected Jan. 


1, 1944 


879.73 




$5,858.12 



SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
JANUARY 1, 1944 

Total Debits 

1941 Town Tax $8,994.49 

1942 Town Tax 20,270.30 

1943 Town Tax 91,086.88 

1941 Personal Tax 861.39 

1942 Personal Tax 1,122.91 

1943 Personal Tax 11,888.04 

1941 Poll Tax 70.61 

1942 Poll Tax 315.18 

1943 Poll Tax 1,965.55 

1940 Excise Tax 26.20 

1941 Excise Tax 279.68 

1942 Excise Tax 1,227.58 

1943 Excise Tax 5,858.12 



$143,966.93 



-57- 



Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $113,265.10 

Abated 2,361.57 

Tax Titles 80.94 

Adjustment .40 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 28,258.92 



$143,966.93 

CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes. 



— SB- 
REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Your Committee on Finance respectfully submits the 
following recommendations for the ensuing year: 

General Government $ 8,600.00 

Bonds 280.00 

Buildings and Grounds 2,400.00 

Police Department 

Chief salary $1,800.00 

War bonus for 

year 300.00 

Expenses and 
operating cruiser 

1,000.00 3,100.00 

Fire Department 3,000.00 

Forest Fires 900.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department 1,200.00 

Tree Warden 650.00 

Health Department, including 

Nurses 3,800.00 

Garbage Disposal, Article 20. 1,800.00 

Highway, Village . 1,200.00 

Chapter 81 7,125.00 

Chapter 90 2,000.00 

Snow Removal, estimate 4,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,400.00 

Welfare 3,000.00 

Soldiers' Benefit 3,000.00 

A. D. C. Federal Aid 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 

Aid 18,000.00 

Education 59,000.00 

Library Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library Books 200.00 



-59— 



Cemeteries 


2,800.00 


Liability Insurance 


600.00 


Committee on Public Safety . . 


500.00 


Memorial Day, Article 5 


250.00 


Dog Officer, Article 7 


200.00 


Ration Board 


1,300.00 


Jones Community Field 




Article 8 


100.00 


Unclassified 


300.00 


Town Forest, Article 10 


500.00 


Interest on Notes, Bonds 


320.00 


Interest on Highway Loans . . . 


22.50 


Bonded Indebtedness 


3,000.00 




$143,300.50 



Article 11 : 

Recommend no action at this time. 

Article 12: 

Recommend appropriation of $150.00 for repairing 
Town Sprayer. 

Article 13: 

Recommend great caution in employing Civil Service 
for this purpose. 

Article 14: 

.Recommend appropriation of $100.00 for necessary 
expenses for Public Welfare. 

Article 15 : 

Recommend no action at this time. 

Article 16 : 

Recommend payment of $277.80 for Mass. Teachers' 
Retirement Board. 

Article 17: 

Recommend appropriation of $1,500.00 for Fluores- 
cent Lighting in schools. 



—60— 

Article 18: 

Recommend appropriation of $1,500.00 for repairing 
roof on High School Building. 

Article 19 : 

Recommend this article. 

Article 21: 

Recommend appropriation of $375.00 for repairing 
doors and painting Fire Houses. 

Article 23 : 

Recommend the sum of $2,000.00 be appropriated from 
the Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 

Article 24 : 

Recommend this article. 

Article 25 : 

Recommend the sum of $393.15 be appropriated to pay 
the following unpaid bills for the different depart- 
ments : 

Fire Department $ 208.30 

Forest Fires 130.10 

Snow Removal 28.75 

Board of Health 26.00 

$393.15 

The sum of $1,996.12 was transferred in 1943 from the 
Reserve Fund to the following accounts. 

Highway, Chapter 81 . . . $ 1,126.95 

Chapter 90 .21 

Village 800.00 

Bonds 2.00 

Moth Dept 1.70 

Tree Warden 38.51 

Police Dept 26.75 

$1,996.12 



—61- 



Precinct 1 — Alden C. Flagg, W. Stuart Allen. 
Precinct 2 — Henry E. Tolman, William T. Merriam. 
Precinct 3 — Porter Jenks, Albert W. Locke. 

Finance Committee. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1943. 

An appropriation of $500 was made for this work last 
year. This money was for emergency work alone, such as 
removing dead and broken limbs and removing dangerous 
trees. The ice storm a year ago has not been taken care of 
properly and we have had some heavy wind this year, which 
has left the trees in bad shape. 

I, therefore, recommend that an appropriation of $900 
be made for the care of this emergency work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTH CONTROL 

WORK 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1943. 

An appropriation of $1000 was made for the moth 
work last year. The cost of spraying material was about 
$445. The labor and running expense of the sprayer and 
truck was $550. This money was only used for spraying. 
There was one spray throughout the town for pest control. 



—62— 

Not enough money was left from this appropriation to allow 
for a proper spraying for the elm leaf beetle, consequently 
part of the town trees were left in rather poor condition. 

I, therefore, recommend that an appropriation of 
$1,500 be made for the spraying of gypsy moth and elm leaf 
beetle and for other work that should be done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I submit herewith my report as Dog Officer, covering 
work done during the year 1943. 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law . . 50 
Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance 

with law 3 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 69 

Warnings to delinquent owners to get licenses 124 

Appropriation $200.00 

50 dogs at $3.00 for six days 150.00 

50 dogs disposed of 50.00 

Total $200.00 

Gentlemen : 

I recommend the appropriation for the year 1944 be 
$200.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dog Officer. 



—63— 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1943 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 

Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1943. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1943 $74,885.15 

Receipts for 1943 : 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Highways $ 9,726.34 

Old Age Assistance, Federal . . 16,258.28 

Aid Dependent Children, Fed. 691.40 

Refund, Buildings 5.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,647.78 

Income Tax 14,473.00 

Business Corporation Tax .... 13,964.97 

Aid Dependent Children 695.57 

Loss of Taxes 588.55 

State Aid 170.00 

War Allowance 5.00 

Chapter 90, Highways 1,500.00 

Vocational Education 137.78 

Meal Tax 635.67 

$ 73,499.34 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Dog Account, Refund $ 643.10 

Highways 1,500.00 

Dog Officer 212.00 

$ 2,355.10 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee, 

Collector of Taxes : 

Poll, 1941 $ 50.00 

Personal, 1941 763.56 



—64— 

Excise, 1941 1,363.47 

Town, 1941 7,204.41 

Poll, 1942 100.00 

Excise, 1942 2,129.30 

Personal, 1942 . . . , 1,009.70 

Town, 1942 11,514.09 

Poll, 1943 1,262.00 

Excise, 1943 4,830.65 

Personal, 1943 10,469.82 

Town, 1943 71,529.99 

Interest 1,004.16 

Costs 33.95 



$113,265.10 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 
Boston Typewriter Co., Schs. . . 
Town of Watertown, Old Age 

Assist 

Elwin Hollowell, Care of Lots. 
Elwin Hollowell, Foundations 
Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines 
Arthur F. Davis, Magazines 

Sold 

Town of Acton, Victory Taxes 
Fred Kennedy, Sale of Lots. . . 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 

Fred Kennedy, Care of Lots . . 
Fred Kennedy, Lowering 

Device 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations . 
Fred Kennedy, Miscellaneous 
Board of Health, Nurse Serv. . 

Selectmen, Licenses 

Town of Acton, Mach. Acct. . 
Concord District Court, Fines 
Harry Holt, Rent of Hall 



190.00 

133.75 

136.00 

138.90 

33.19 

8.75 

1,013.36 

60.00 

468.00 

525.00 

81.00 

41.50 

46.00 

216.50 

31.00 

877.30 

163.50 

187.50 



—65— 



I 



Acton Grange No. 259, Rent 




of Hall 


35.00 


Richard Johns, Mach. Acct. . . 


3.00 


William Kazokas, Mach. Acct. 


151.75 


Frederick K. Johnson, Garbage 




Contract 


100.00 


Carl E. Anderson, Sealer Wts. 


65.52 


Harlan E. Tuttle, Dog Licenses 


824.40 


Town of Boxboro, Schools .... 


2,856.11 


Town of Acton, Withholding 




Taxes 


188.62 


George Hendrickson, Tax Title 


85.56 


George Hendrickson, Interest 


9.12 


Town of Concord, Old Age 




Assist 


67.50 


Town of Ashland, Old Age 




Assist 


57.71 


Selectmen, Telephone Calls . . 


.65 


Town of Wrentham, Old Age 




Assist 


139.08 


Town of Concord, Welfare . . . 


178.51 


Town of Littleton, Old Age 


, 


Assist 


53.34 


Town of Swansea, Old Age 




Assist 


39.58 


Town of Maynard, Old Age 




Assist 


109.33 


Boston and Maine R. R. Fires. 


43.00 


Town of Westford, Schools . . . 


335.09 


Horace F. Tuttle, Lots Sold 




Woodlawn 


60.00 


City of Somerville, Old Age 




Assist 


137.52 


Board of Health, Licenses .... 


118.50 


City of Boston, Schools 


184.68 


City of Boston, Welfare 


100.00 


City of Lowell, Old Age Asst. . 


46.25 



-66— 



Town of Concord, Land Tax . . 


25.12 


Second National Bank, Fire 




Truck Notes 


3,000.00 


Second National Bank, Interest 


3.25 


Merchants National Bank, Note 




Chapt. 44 


10,000.00 


Merchants National Bank, Int. 


1.00 


School Dept. Telephone and 




Book Fines 


7.09 


Wm. Henry Soar, Board Health 




1942 


2.50 


Cancelled Checks 


221.62 


Wendall Putnam, Mach. Acct. 


16.00 


Town of Arlington, Old Age 




Assist 


104.25 


Town of Methuen, Military Aid 


75.00 


Town of Methuen, Soldiers' 




Relief 


12.50 


Chief of Police, Revolver 




Permits 


7.00 


Chief of Police, Bicycle Regis. 


17.00 


Concord District Court, Resti- 




tutions 


50.00 


Arthur F. Davis, Book Sold . . 


1.75 


Carrie M. Durkee, Certificate 




Liens 


11.00 


Town of Phillipston, Old Age 




Assist 


52.33 


Ralph Rogers, Salary Adjust.. 


16.00 


Harry Holt, Grange Rent .... 


32.50 


Tlieron A. Lowden, Ins. Refund 


161.39 


Transfer from Memorial Li- 




brary Fund 


212.20 


Transfer from Cemetery Funds 


1,233.20 


Transfer from Susan Noyes 




Hosmer Fund 


488.30 



—67— 

Transfer from Blanchard Fd. . 25.00 



$ 26,117.07 



Total Cash Receipts $215,236.61 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1943 74,885.15 



Sum Total for 1943 $290,121.76 

Payments in 1943 : 

Selectmen's Orders $203,356.90 

State Taxes 3,189.15 

$206,546.05 

Cash Balance, Dec. 31, 1943. . $ 83,575.71 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 

High School Bonds, due 1944 to 1945 $ 2,000.00 

High School Addition Notes, 163 to 176, due 

1944 to 1957 14,000.00 

Anticipation Section 6A Chapter 44, General 

Laws, note 179 due March 15, 1944 from 

State and County 10,000.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, notes 180-181- 

182 due 1944 to 1946 3,000.00 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Principal Fund $ 82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 719.98 

■ $ 82,958.93 

Received Interest for 1943 . . . 1,737.17 

$ 84,696.10 
Balance December 31, 1943: 

Bank Balances in Sav. Banks. $ 84,207.80 

Transfer to Town Account ... 488.30 

$ 84,696.10 



-68— 



CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Principal Fund $ 44,912.21 

Unexpended Balance 2,331.13 

$ 47,243.34 

Received for Perpetual Care . . 1,400.00 

Received Interest for 1943 . . . 947.77 



$ 49,591.11 



Balance December 31, 1943: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 48,357.91 

Transfer to Town Account . . . 1,233.20 



$ 49,591.11 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Principal Fund $ 25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 1,869.27 



$ 26,869.27 
Received Interest for 1943 . . . 558.95 



$ 27,428.22 



Balance December 31, 1943: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Bank . . $ 27,228.22 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1943 200.00 



$ 27,428.22 



WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Principal Fund $ 14,180.75 

Unexpended Balance 514.36 

$ 14,695.11 



—69— 

Received Interest for 1943 .... 307.12 



$ 15,002.23 
Balance December 31, 1943: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 14,790.03 

Transfer to Town Account . . 212.20 



$15,002.23 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943 : 

Principal Fund $ 13,500.00 

Unexpended Balance 48.57 

$ 13,548.57 

Bequest to Fund in 1943 573.70 

Received Interest for 1943 . . . 287.05 



$ 14,409.32 
Balance December 31, 1943:, 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 14,284.32 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1943 125.00 



$ 14,409.32 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Balance $ 1,505.60 

Received Interest for 1943 . . . 25.54 

$ 1,531.14 
Balance December 31, 1943: 

Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 1,506.14 

Transfer to Town Account . . 25.00 

$ 1,531.14 



—70— 

CEMETERY SURPLUS FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Balance $ 1,044.09 

Received Interest for 1943 . . . 20.98 



$ 1,065.07 
Balance December 31, 1943: 
Balance in Savings Bank .... $ 1,065.07 

SARAH J. GREEN FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Balance $ 150.00 

Unexpended Balance 4.03 

$ 154.03 

Received Interest for 1943 3.09 



$ 157.12 
Balance December 31, 1943: 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 157.12 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943 : 

Balance $ 634.74 

Received Interest for 1943 ... 12.75 

Balance Dec. 31, 1943 ... $ 647.49 

Balance in Savings Bank 647.49 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1943: 

Principal Fund $ 2,335.00 

Unexpended Balance 175.58 

$ 2,510.58 



—71- 



Received to Fund: 
Company Salaries 1943 . . . 


. . . $ 


230.00 
51.51 


$ 




Received Interest for 1943. 




281.51 




1943: 




Balance December 31, 
Balance in Savings Bank . . 


$ 

$ 


2,792.09 
2,773.09 


Paid Trustee's Orders for 1 


943. . 


19.00 




$ 


2,792.09 



Respectfully submitted, 



WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 
Gentlemen: 

The Highv^ay Department reports for the year 1943. 

In addition to the ordinary maintenance such as patch- 
ing, cleaning up gutters and drainage the following surface 
treatment program was completed : 

Treated with asphalt and crushed stone : 

Central Street, Concord Road, High Street, Main 
Street, Pope Road, Powder Mill Road, School Street, Sum- 
mer Street. 

Treated with tar and sand and honed : 

Central Street, Concord Street, Elm Street, Hayward 
Road, Main Street, Maple Street, Nagog Hill Road, Piper 
Road, Strawberry Hill Road, Taylor Road, Woodbury Lane. 

Treated with tar and crushed stone road mixed, spread 
and rolled: 

Main Street. 



—72— 

Prospect Street was graveled, graded, rolled and sur- 
face treated from Main Street to Massachusetts Avenue. 

Widening with bituminous patch was done on Concord 
Road, High Street, Main Street and River Street. 

Davis Terrace was surfaced with bituminous concrete. 

The railroad overpass on Main Street was resurfaced 
with hard pine plank. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM C. KAZOKAS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF WAR PRICE AND RATIONING BOARD 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

Your War Price and Rationing Board No. 41, after its 
appointment by the Board of Selectmen on December 29, 
1941, was organized on January 2, 1942 and held its first 
meeting January 5, 1942, its original members consisting of 
Mr. Webster S. Blanchard, Mr. Allen G. Moody and Mr. 
Ralph W. Piper. Its offices were set up in the Town Hall 
at that time. Later, during the year, Mr. Howard J. Billings 
and Miss Clara L. Sawyer were added to the Board. 

Predicated upon the sound premise that rationing is a 
necessity when a scarcity of any essential goods, created by 
the demands of war, might easily lead to a serious maldistri- 
bution of supply, and further, to hoarding by those who 
could afford to buy at the expense of those who could not, 
tires became the first item on the list of rationed commodi- 
ties. In rapid succession followed gasoline, sugar, coffee, 
typewriters, rubber footwear, fuel oil, stoves, bicycles, and 
price control. Many and varied were the complications 
during 1942, with a confusion of instructions, regulations 



—73— 

and directives being almost constantly with us. The year 
1943 has steadied down and the work has become some- 
what routine, yet with many problems. 

Your Board has been extremely fortunate in being 
able to employ, from its inception, Mrs. Beatrice Parsons 
as Executive Secretary, her salary being paid for in full by 
the Federal government. Her courtesy, quick grasp of the 
multitudinous detail, and devotion to her duty, have been a 
great source of strength to us. The office has been most 
efficiently managed by her and the cost of supplies, some 
of which are furnished by the Town, has been kept at a 
minimum. She has been ably assisted by Mrs. Vesta B. 
Thompson, who was with us until her marriage last sum- 
mer, and now by Miss Sonya Farley and Mrs. Dorothy 
Spencer, both loyal and able co-workers, whom we are 
fortunate to have with us. Miss Farley's salary is paid by 
the Federal government in about three-quarters of its 
amount, the balance coming from the Town, while Mrs. 
Spencer's, in its entirety, is paid by the Town. As those of 
you who have been in and out of our office, know, the de- 
tail work keeps all the clerical employees really busy, not 
alone with helping those of you who have rationing prob- 
lems, but also with the great amount of so-called *'red tape" 
reports going to the State Board and Washington. 

To the several able volunteer workers and to the school 
teachers, we are particularly indebted for their conscien- 
tious and much needed assistance from time to time. Their 
help has been invaluable. 

The Board, under its present set-up, is divided into the 
following panels: 

Gasoline : Webster S. Blanchard, Chairman ; Howard 
J. Billings, Miss Clara L. Sawyer. 

Tires: Allen G. Moody, Chairman; Ralph W. Piper, 
Webster S. Blanchard. 



—74— 

Food: Miss Clara L. Sawyer, Chairman; Ralph W. 
Piper, Allan G. Moody. 

Fuel Oil: Howard J. Billings, Chairman; Miss Clara L. 
Sawyer, Webster S. Blanchard. 

Footwear, Stoves, Bicycles, Shoes : Ralph W. Piper, 
Chairman ; Webster S. Blanchard, Howard J. Billings. 

Price Control : Allen G. Moody, Webster S. Blanchard, 
Miss Clara L. Sawyer. 

Volunteer Price Assistant: Harry E. Holt. 

From its organization your Board has felt that, unless 
the citizens of the Town had, at all times, free access to its 
members in order to have their problems delineated to them 
and solved for them in a courteous, just and fair manner, it 
would be derelict in its duty. Consequently, it has been the 
constant endeavor of the members to give the public every 
opportunity to contact those of us who were responsible so 
that we might create a better understanding of the often- 
times rather confused and intricate situations caused by the 
rationing program. 

How well we have succeeded, only those of you who 
have had occasion to deal with us know, but all of us on 
your Board do know that the vast majority of you have 
been very co-operative, very patient, and very patriotic in 
your endeavors to help in an essential and war-created 
problem. We, for our part, wish you to know how greatly 
we appreciate it. At all times we are ready to help you. 

Your Chairman would be remiss if he did not, at this 
time, commend to your attention the amount of time, 
thought and energy devoted to this war cause by the Board 
members, unpaid as they are, who serve with him; time, 
thought and energy given freely, constantly, intelligently, 
and above all, courteously, even in times of stress, and 
many times at the unselfish sacrifice of their own interests. 

Respectfully submitted, for the Board, 

WEBSTER S. BLANCHARD, Chairman. 



—75- 



REPORT OF TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton: 

I herewith submit my annual report covering the finan- 
cial transactions of the town for the year ended December 
31, 1943. Included are a detailed statement of expenditures 
of each department, a tabulated record showing the appro- 
priation's, transfers, and balances as of December 31, 1943; 
also statements of reserve fund transfers, machinery fund 
and cemetery land fund, and a balance sheet as of Decem- 
ber 31, 1943. 

The town was able to buy the new fire truck this year 
which increased our bonded debt a little. The total pay- 
ments on the Bonded Debt this coming year will be $3,000. 
The town increased its surplus revenue substantially 
and closed the year with a Surplus Revenue of $89,079.01. 

I have audited the books of the Collector of Taxes and 
of the treasurer and verified the several trust funds in his 
custody. I have verified the funds in the custody of trustees. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Account 



—76— 



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—80— 

Cash Receipts and Departmental Payments 

TREASURER'S RECEIPTS 

See Treasurer's Itemized Report $215,236.61 

Cash Balance Januat-y 1, 1943 . . 74,885.15 $290,121.76 

PAYMENTS 
General Government 

Selectmen, Salaries and 
Wages: 

Selectmen $ 700.01 

Clerks 1,142.23 

Postage 44.00 

Stationery, 

Supplies 22.16 

Town Reports . . . 251.60 

Middlesex County 
Selectmen's 

Assn 9.00 

Assn. Town Fi- 
nance Commit- 
tees 10.00 

Desk 49.00 

Sundry Expense . . 23.41 

$2,251.41 

Collector of taxes: 

Salary $ 1,000.00 

Postage 88.68 

Printing 40.19 

Stationery 24.92 

Tax Title Expense 15.52 

1,169.31 



-81- 



Treasurer : 

Salary $ 625.00 

Postage 131.93 

Telephone 14.90 

Stationery, print- 
ing 48.28 

Certifying Notes 8.00 

Typewriter 

repairs 7.50 

Sundry expense . 13.37 



Assessors : 

Salaries $900.00 

Stationery, print- 
ing 28.28 

Transfer notices . . 3.15 

Attending meet- 
ings 35.00 

Sundry expense . . 11.74 



\ 



Accountant: 

Salary $625.00 

Postage 7.00 

Stationery, print- 
ing 21.07 



Town Clerk: 

Salary $200.00 

Rec. vital statics. . 85.50 

Postage 15.00 

Stationery, print- 
ing 21.50 

Attending meetings 12.00 

Assn. dues 3.00 



848.98 



978.17 



653.07 



—82— 



Telephone 


20.00 


Repair typewriter 


8.00 


Sundry expense . . 


11.63 


Elections and Regis- 




trations : 


, 


Salaries : 




Registrars .... 


$260.00 


Listing 


75.00 


Moderator .... 


25.00 


Election officers 


65.00 


Printing 


85.22 


Rent 


10.00 


Posting warrants. . 


5.00 


Sundry expense . . 


7.60 


Sealer of Weights 




and Measures: 




Salary and Trans- 




portation .... 


$200.00 


Books, Seals, Adv. 


11.56 


Cattle Inspector: 




Salary 




Board of Health: 




Salaries 


40.00 


Postage, Telephone 


2.09 


Soldiers' Relief Agent: 




Salary 


$50.00 


Assn. dues 


2.00 


Travel expenses . 


9.72 



376.63 



532.82 



211.56 
125.00 

42.09 



61.72 



—83— 

Public Welfare : 

Salaries " 275.00 



Protection of Persons 
and Property : 
Police : 
Salaries : 

Chief $2,025.00 

Patrolman 417.20 

Special officers . 186.75 



$7,525.76 



Bonds: 

Collector, Treasurer, 
Town Clerk, Dep- 
uty Collector . . 277.00 
Buildings and Grounds: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Janitor $644.09 

Labor on grounds 

and building . 255.12 

Heat 644.63 

Lights 242.94 

Telephone 69.86 

Fire House door. . , 273.45 

Cement work 75.00 

Lamps 18.90 

Electrical work . . . 20.00 

Water 13.00 

Truck hire 19.50 

Flags 20.19 

Floor covering po- 
lice office 38.67 

Repair lawn mower 55.87 

Boiler inspection . 5.00 

Boiler repairs .... 9.57 

Cement 11.36 , 

Sundry expense . . 67.60 

2,484.75 



—84— 

Auto repairs 96.55 

Gas, oil 259.07 

Telephone 109.44 

Radio service .... 75.00 

Insurance \ 12.00 

Clothing 102.88 

Prof, services .... 10.00 

Batteries 15.00 

Anti-freeze 7.35 

Repair typewriter. 20.00 

Seat cover 10.00 

Books 20.40 

Sundry expense . . . 32.61 



Fire Department: 
Salaries and Wages: 

Annual $460.00 

Fires 581.27 

Janitors 360.00 

Heat 401.28 

Light 201.58 

Telephone 102.27 

Gas and oil 64.85 

New equipment . . 549.59 

Rep. equipment . . 154.89 

Rep. buildings . . . 5.00 

Chiefs bond 5.00 

Call cards ....... 44.74 

Certificates 10.43 

Dry cells 7.20 

Hose racks 47.11 

Trimming trees 
along fire alarm 

wires 73.52 

Water 36.00 

Towel service .... 12.00 



3,399.25 



■85- 



Anti-freeze 7.00 

Meter 15.00 

Sundry items 36.49 



Hydrants : 




West and South 




Water District . 


$3,200.00 


Town of Concord . 


253.00 


Moth Department: 




Salaries and Wages 




Supt 


$190.50 


Labor 


153.01 


Trucks 


140.85 


Gas and oil 


38.13 


Lead 


444.21 


Repairing sprayer 


7.75 


Battery 


11.50 


Sundry expense . . 


15.75 



Tree Warden: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Supt $290.46 

Labor 112.80 

Trucks 124.15 

Tools 11.10 



3,175.22 



Forest Fires : 

Wages, fires 1,079.52 

Ladder Truck: 

Truck $3,819.00 

Additional equip- 
ment 177.50 

3,996.50 



3,453.00 



1,001.70 



538.51 



—86— 



Health and Sanitation 


Board of Health : 




Salaries and Wages: 




Agent 


$63.40 


Labor, at town* 




dump 


640.00 


Prof, services . . 


108.00 


Postage and tele- 




phone 


2.31 


Books 


4.43 


Legal services . . . 


109.90 


Sundry expense . . 


5.00 


Town Nurse: 




Salary includes 




transportation 


2,000.00 


Medical supplies 


40.34 


Special Nurse : 




Salary 




Dog Officer: 




Keeping and de- 




stroying dogs 





Garbage Disposal: 
Collection of gar- 
bage $1,040.00 

Advertising 8.15 

Sundry expense . . 20.27 



933.04 



2,040.34 



171.00 



200.00 



1,068.42 



—87— 

Highways 

Village : 

Salaries and Wages : 

Supt $93.45 

Labor 230.40 

Trucks 64.20 

Stone 43.22 

Asphalt 147.37 

Planking & spikes 558.53 

Sand 10.46 

Traffic paint 39.60 

Sundry expense . . 24.85 



Chapter 81 : 

Salaries and Wages: 

Supt $1,245.76 

Labor 2,672.65 

Trucks 3,098.10 

Rental of equip- 
ment 1,473.05 

Broken stone 1,898.62 

Patching material. 291.97 

Oil and tar 3,304.47 

Sand 226.47 

Cement 17.40 

Sundry expense . . 23.46 



Chapter 90: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Supt $148.50 

Labor 358.60 

Trucks 427.35 

Equipment rental . 211.00 



1,212.08 



14,251.95 



—88- 

Broken stone 1,340.63 

Patching material. 138.42 
Oil and tar 1,875.71 



Snow Removal: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Supt $249.83 

Labor 1,144.11 

Trucks 1,165.87 

Plowing snow .... 2,486.50 

Equipment rental . 188.50 

Sand 95.30 

Salt 516.00 

Paint 11.75 

Installing plough . 10.00 
Repairing equip- 
ment, parts, etc. 104.30 
Sundry expense . . 25.84 



Machinery Account: 

Tools $62.44 

Gas and oil 181.47 

New equipment . . 44.48 

Repair equipment. 209.26 

Express 8.93 

Sundry items 4.25 



Street Lighting: 

Street lighting .... $3,555.72 
Reducing lights 

from 800 to 600 

lumens 129.99 



4,500.21 



5,998.00 



510.83 



3.685.71 



—89— 

Charities : 

Public Welfare, 
Temporary Aid: 
Cash to indi- 
viduals $391.50 

Provisions 28.00 

Fuel 61.24 

Light . 2.71 

Medical and hos- 
pital aid .... 161.45 
Relief by other 
cities and 
tov^ns 1,784.98 

Administrative : 
Attending meet- 
ings 24.00 

Assn. dues .... 2.00 

Transportation . 5.00 

Stationery 6.93 



Old Age Assistance : 

Cash Aid $16,987.82 

Indirect payments . 111.10 
Aid by other cities 

and towns 300.13 



2,467.81 



17,399.05 



U.S.Grant: 

Cash Aid $15,733.89 

Administration : 

Salary, expenses 524.39 16,258.28 33,657.33 

Aid to Dependent 
Children : 
Cash Aid 1,481.25 



90- 



U. S. Grant: 

Cash Aid 514.75 1,996.00 

Soldiers' Benefits: 

Cash Aid ,. 519.50 

Provisions 49.99 

Medical & hospital 222.71 

Fuel 71.99 

Other Qities and 

towns 44.40 

Administrative : 
Travel 

expense 10.26 

Printing 5.00 



Maintenance : 

Salaries and Wages: 

Librarian $104.00 

Assist. Librarian . 175.50 

Janitors 154.50 

Writing cards, 

printing 45.52 

Heat 291.60 

Light 43.48 

. Postage .86 

Insurance 61.13 

Water 12.00 

Sundry expense . . 2.63 



923.85 



Education: 

See Report of the 
School Comm. . . 57,990.92 



Library 



-91- 



Branch Libraries: 

Salaries, Wages . . $203.75 

Janitors 15.60 

Transporting books 38.00 

Heat 45.91 

Light 10.29 

Sundry expense . . 6.00 



Cemeteries: 

Salaries, Wages: 

Supts $1,573.25 

Labor " 628.70 

Power Trimmer . . 117.60 

Trucking 117.00 

Grass seed 17.57 

Sharpening mowers 27.90 

Flowers, shrubs . . 38.00 

Lumber 44.88 

Tools 12.98 

Fertilizer, cement. 59.75 

Repair tool house. 10.50 

Pipe and laying . . 28.36 

Loam 9.00 

Writing deeds . . . 3.00 

Water 29.87 

Postage, telephone 19.71 

Paint 5.19 

Sundry expense . . 34.10 



1,210.77 



Library Books: 

Books, magazines 

etc 412.20 



Cemeteries 



2,777.36 



—92- 



irpetual Care: 




Salaries and Wages: 




Supts 


$606.75 


Labor ► 


539.70 


Flowers 


66.80 


Fertilizer 


16.95 


Gasoline 


3.00 



Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund : 
Care of lots 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 
Salaries and Wages : 

Supt $358.50 

Labor 93.60 

Trucking 24.00 

Sundry expense . . 12.20 



1,233.20 
25.00 



Liability Insurance : 
Premium 

Committee on Public Safety: 

Curtains $76.35 

Electrical work . . . 24.45 

Postage, stationery 6.49 

Telephone 17.24 

Laundry 9.37 

Rationing Board: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Clerks $1,091.32 

Stationery, printing 135.93 

Telephone . 68.05 

Sundry expense . . 13.60 



488.30 



697.32 



133.90 



1,308.90 



—93— 

Spotting Tower: 

Sundry expense . . 10.48 

Memorial Day: 

Music . $125.00 

Flags 39.66 

Flowers, wreaths . 60.90 

Sundry expense . . 6.54 

232.10 

490.00 

6.00 



Town Forest Committee 


. 


49 acres woodland . 




Work Relief: 




Treas, U.S.A. project 




Jones Community Field 


: 


Salaries and Wages: 




Supt 


$8.40 


Mowing 


28.00 


Gasoline, oil 


15.70 


repairing mower . 


5.80 


Sundry expense . . . 


15.55 


Unclassified: 




Expense acct ra- 




tioning board . . 


$130.38 


Repair typewriter. 


17.50 


Flags 


22.49 


Expense a/c titles. 


15.00 


Sundry expense . . 


9.49 


Notes and Bonds: 




High School bonds $1,000.00 


High School addi- 




tional bonds . . . 


1,000.00 



73.45 



194.86 



2,000.00 



—94— 

Int. on notes and bonds 

High School bonds $120.00 
High School addi- 
tion bonds 225.00 

. 345.00 

Int. on Revenue loans 125.00 

No Appropriation Items 

Agency : 

State Tax $3,100.00 

State Parks 89.15 

County Tax 4,653.62 

County Hospital As- 
sessment 1,076.28 

8,919.05 

Refunds : 

Motor Vehicle Ex- 
cise Taxes $48.40 

Real and Personal 

Taxes 87.18 

Poll Taxes 2.00 

137.58 

Middlesex County Dog 

licenses $839.40 

Cemetery Land Fd. 

Purchase of lots 40.00 

F. K. Johnson refund 
deposit garbage 
contract 100.00 

Tailing account .... 5.50 

Victory and With- 
holding Tax . . . 1,201.98 

2,186.88 

Revenue Loans 25,000.00 



Total Expenditures $206,546.05 



—95- 



Cash Balance .... 

Dec.31, 1943. . 83,575.71 



Statement of Reserve Fund Transfers : 

Bonds (surety) 2.00 

Police Dept 26.75 

Moth Dept 1.70 

Tree Warden 38.51 

Highways Village 800.00 

Highways Chapter 81 ' 1,126.95 

Highways Chapter 90 .21 



$1,996.12 
Unexpended balance 3.88 



Statement of Machinery Fund: 

Balance Jan. 1, 1943 $598.20 

Received from rentals 1,048.05 



Transferred to Rd. Mach. Acct. 500.00 
Balance December 31, 1943 . . . 1,146.25 



Statement of Cemetery Land Fund : 

Balance Jan. 1, 1943 $387.35 

Received from sales of lots .... 131.00 



Paid repurchase of lots 40.00 

Balance Dec. 31, 1943 478.35 



$290,121.76 



2,000.00 



1,646.25 
1,646.25 



518.35 



518.35 



—96— 



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—99— 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

October 28, 1943. 
To the Board of Selectmen: 

Mr. George A. Morse, Chairman 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Acton for the period from No- 
vember 20, 1940 to August 21, 1943, made in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in 
the form of a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 

Director of Accounts 
Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an 
audit of the books and accounts of the town of Acton for 
the period from November 20, 1940, the date of the previ- 
ous examination, to August 21, 1943, and submit the follow- 
ing report thereon: 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked. The ledger accounts were an- 
alyzed, the recorded receipts and payments being checked 
with the treasurer's books. The appropriations voted by the 
town and the transfers from the reserve fund, as recorded, 
were checked with the town clerk's records of financial 
votes passed at town meetings and with the finance com- 
mittee's records of authorized transfers from the reserve 
fund. A trial balance was taken off, and a balance sheet, 



—100— 

showing the financial condition of the town as of August 
21, 1943, was prepared and is appended to this report. 

As may be seen from the balance sheet, the town is in 
very good financial condition. 

The balance sh-eet also shows several appropriation 
overdrafts, which are contrary to the provisions of Section 
31, Chapter 44, General Laws. However, overdrafts in 
Chapter 81 or 90 highway appropriations, toward which 
the State and County contribute funds, may be avoided by 
the issuance of temporary loans under Section 6A, Chapter 
44, General Laws. If the town desires to avoid such loans, 
an appropriation could be voted from available funds for 
the amount of the State's and County's allotments, with a 
provision that the reimbursements from the State and 
County be credited back upon their receipts to surplus rev- 
enue. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked. The cash book additions were ver- 
ified and the recorded receipts were analyzed and com- 
pared with the town accountant's ledger, with the records 
in the various departments, and with other sources from 
which money was paid into the town treasury. The dis- 
bursements were checked with the selectmen's warrants 
authorizing the treasurer to pay out town funds, and the 
cash balance as of August 21, 1943, was proved by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished by 
the bank of deposit and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The recorded payments of debt and interest were 
proved with the amounts falling due and by examination 
of the cancelled securities and coupons on file. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were exam- 
ined. The amounts added to the tax title account were 
com.pared with the tax collector's records, the reported re- 
demptions were checked with the receipts as recorded on 
the treasurer's cash book, and the tax title deeds as listed 
were checked with the records in the Registry of Deeds. 



—101— 

The savings bank books and securities representing 
the investment of the several trust funds in the custody of 
the town treasurer and the trustees were examined. The 
income was proved, the disbursements were verified by com- 
parison with the vouchers on file, and the transfers to the 
town were checked with the receipts as recorded on the 
treasurer's cash book. 

It is again recommended that trust fund income be 
withdrawn from the savings banks before the payment of 
bills chargeable to such income is made. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. The poll, property, and motor ve- 
hicle excise taxes outstanding at the time of the previous 
examination and all subsequent commitments were audited 
and reconciled with the assessors' warrants. The pay- 
ments to the treasurer were checked to the treasurer's cash 
book, the recorded abatements were compared with the as- 
sessors' records of abatements granted, and the outstand- 
ing accounts were listed and reconciled with the respective 
ledger accounts. 

It is recommended that the tax collector's payments 
to the treasurer be made at least weekly, as required by 
the provisions of Section 2, Chapter 60, General Laws. 

Verification of the outstanding accounts was made by 
sending notices to a number of persons whose names ap- 
peared on the books as owing money to the town, the re- 
plies received thereto indicating the accounts as listed are 
correct. 

The records of dog and sporting licenses issued by the 
town clerk were examined and checked. The recorded 
payments to the treasurer and to the State were verified 
and the town clerk's cash balance on September 18, 1943, 
was proved by count of cash in the office. 

Payments of dog license receipts by the town clerk to 
the town treasurer should be made on the first Monday of 
each month or oftener, as required by Section 147, Chapter 
140, General Laws, as amended, while payments to the Di- 



—102— 

vision of Fisheries and Game of money collected for sport- 
ing licenses must also be made on the first Monday of each 
month, in accordance with the provisions of Section 13, 
v^uapter 181, General Laws, as amended by Chapter 599, 
Acts of 1941. 

The surety bonds of the town officials required by law 
to furnish them were examined and found to be in proper 
form. 

The available records of accounts receivable of the 
welfare department, including the bureau of old age as- 
sistance, were examined, the payments made to the treas- 
urer and disallowances by the State were verified, and 
the outstanding accounts as of August 21, 1943, were listed 
and reconciled with the town accountant's books. 

The accounts of the sealer of weights and measures 
were examined and checked and the payments to the 
treasurer were verified. Attention of the sealer is called 
to Section 34, Chapter 98, General Laws, which requires all 
fees collected to be paid into the town treasury monthly. 

The records of licenses and permits issued by the se- 
lectmen and the health department, as well as the records 
of all other departments collecting money for the town, 
were examined, checked, and reconciled with the treas- 
urer's and the town accountant's books. 

It was noted that the receipts for licenses and permits 
issued by the health department during the year 1942, 
were not paid over to the treasurer until September 4, 1943, 
and it is therefore recommended that all such receipts be 
turned into the town treasury each month. 

While engaged in making the audit, cooperation was 
received from all town officials, for which, on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 



—103— 

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance November 20, 1940 $ 61,424.18 

Receipts: 

Nov. 20 to Dec. 31, 

1940 $ 36,655.95 

1941 253,527.52 

1942 236,284.26 



526,467.73 



Payments : 

Nov. 20 to Dec. 31, 

1940 $ 49,699.83 

1941 238,871.70 

1942 224,435.23 



$513,006.76 



Balance Dec. 31, 1942 74,885.15 



Balance Jan. 1, 1943 $ 74,885.15 

Receipts Jan. 1 to 

Aug. 21, 1943 74,082.11 

Unpaid warrant No. 

259 125.00 



Payments Jan. 1 to 

Aug. 21, 1943. $129,478.73 

Balance Aug. 21, 1943: 
First Nat. Bank, 

Ayer $ 17,719.65 

Cash in office ver- 
ified 1,891.38 

Cash variation . . 2.50 

19,613.53 



$587,891.91 



$587,891.91 



$149,092.26 



$149,092.26 



—104— 

First National Bank, Ayer 

Balance August 21, 
1943, per state- • 
ment $ 24,331.21 

Balance August 21, 
1943, per check 
book $ 17,719.65 

Outstanding checks 
Aug. 21, 1943, 

per list 6,611.56 

$24,331.21 



RECONCILIATION OF COLLECTOR'S CASH 

Cash balances August 21, 1943, per tables: 

Polls 1941 $ 14.00 

Personal property- 
taxes 1941 . . . 111.18 
Real estate taxes 

1941 267.73 

Polls 1942 12.00 

Personal property 

taxes 1942 78.10 

Real estate taxes 

1942 1,005.14 

Polls 1943 204.00 

Personal property 

taxes 1943 . 207.46 

Real estate taxes 

1943 8,786.95 

Motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes 1941 12.61 

Motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes 1942 144.36 



—105— 

Motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes 1943 232.17 - 
Interest and costs 

on taxes 77.07 

$11,152.77 

Excess cash August 

21, 1943 1.33 



Collector's overpay- 
ments to treas- 
urer, polls 1943 $100.00 
Cash on hand Aug. 
21, 1943: 
Concord National 

Bank $10,605.54 

In office, verified. 448.56 

$11,054.10 



$11,154.10 



$11,154.10 



Concord National Bank 

Balance August 21, 
1943, per state- 
ment $12,251.20 

Balance August 21, 
1943, per check 
book $10,605.54 

Outstanding checks 
Aug. 21, 1943, 

per list 1,645.66 

$12,251.20 



—106- 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

of the 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31, 1943 



—HI- 
ORGANIZATION 

School Committee 

Mr. Walter B. Stevens, Chairman .... Term expires 1944 

Mr. Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Mrs. Arthur Fraser Term expires 1944 

Mr. Robert C. Hall Term expires 1945 

Mr. Richard Lowden Term expires 1945 

Mrs. G. Howard Reed Term expires 1946 

Meetings of the School Committee 

Regular meetings of the school committee are held the 
first Tuesday of each month in the high school at 8 :00 P. M. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 

Richard B. Greenman 
Office— High School Building, Telephone 110 

School Physician Ernest A. Mayell, M. D. 

East Acton, Telephone 345-3 

School Nurse Mrs. Simon D. Taylor, R. N. 

North Acton, Telephone 33-22 

Attendance Officer Carl Anderson 

West Acton, Telephone 110 or 16-12 
Custodians: 

High School, Tel. 110 Catl Anderson 

Center School, Tel. 86 Harry E. Holt 

South School, Tel. 445 Benjamin Sawyer 

West School, Tel. 105 Ernest G. Banks 

Tentative Calendar for 1944 

January 3 — Schools open. 
February 18 — Schools close. 
February 28 — Schools open. 
April 14 — Schools close. 
April 24 — Schools open. 



—112— 

May 30 — Memorial Day. 
June 9 — Elementary schools close. 
June 16 — High school graduation. 
June 23 — High school closes. 

School Year 1944-1945 

September 6 — High school opens. 
September 11 — Elementary schools open. 
October 12 and 13 — Holiday (Columbus Day). 
October 27 — Teachers' Convention. 
Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 — Thanksgiving Recess. 
December 21 — Schools close at noon. 

1945 

January 2 — Schools open 
February 16 — Schools close. 
February 26 — Schools open. 
April 13 — Schools close. 
April 23 — Schools open. 
May 30 — Holiday (Memorial Day). 
June 8 — Elementary schools close. 
June 15 — High School graduation. 
June 22 — High school closes. 

No School Signal — All schools all day 

7:00 A. M., fire whistle in all precincts— 2-2-2-2. 

7 :00-8 :00 A.M., radio announcements over WBZ and WEEI. 



STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School (as amended by vote of the school 

committee November 2, 1943) 

Children shall not be admitted to the public school un- 
less they are 5 years, 9 months of age on or before Septem- 
ber 1. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first two 
weeks of school. All children entering for the first time 
must present birth and vaccination certificates. 



—113— 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 514 hours in the 
elementary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with suf- 
ficient recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened to 
pupils except by the principals, or persons delegated by the 
principals. 

3. School Buses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils 
must meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct 
themselves properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness (as amended by 
vote of the school committee January, 1944). 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly except 
for illness. They must present a written excuse signed by 
parent or guardian stating a definite reason for each ab- 
sence or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon 
not longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and 
for a longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Sec- 
tion 15 : 

"A child from a household where a person is ill with 
smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other 
infectious or contagious disease, or from a household ex- 
posed to contagion from any such disease in another house- 
hold, shall not attend any public school during such illness 
or exposure until the teacher of the school has been fur- 
nished with a certificate from the local board of health, 
school physician or from the attending physician, stating 
that danger of conveying such disease by such child has 
passed," 



—114— 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to 
them by the school authorities and shall not mar or injure 
any form of school property. 

8. Fire Drill (as amended by vote of the school committee 
January, 1944). 

Fire drills shall be held at least once a month in all 
schools. 



—US- 
TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
As of January 1, 1944 



Center School 

-Ruth Johnson (Mrs.), Prin. 
Eardana Berry (Mrs.) 
Helga Archer (Mrs.) 

South School 

Julia McCarthy, Prin. 
Florence Merriam 
Carolyn Tuttle. B. S. E. 

West School 

-Grace Callanan, B. S. E., 

Prin. 
Alice Feehan, B. S. E. 
Carrie F. Wells 

High School 

Richard B. Greeman, Prin. 

A. B., Ed. M. 
Walter W. Holt, Vice-Prin. 

of .S. H. S.. B. S., M. A. 
-■Richard E. Bradford, Vice 

Prin. of J. H. S., B. S. E. 
Lydia Abbott, A. B. 
Margaret Boornazian 
Mary Emerson (Mrs.) B. S. 
Wilbert Hayes 
Henry Hopkinson, L.L.B. 
Marjorie Jones, B. S. 
Barbara Kundhardt (Mrs.) 

B. S. 
Norma Leppanen. A. B. 
Henrietta Schmidt, B. S. 
Marion Towne, A. B. 

Supervisors 

Dorothy Beers, B. S. P. E. 
Jeanne Toohey (Mrs.) 
Charles K. Yeremian 

-Acting- Principal 
* -Acting Vice-Principal 



Appt. 


Graduate of 


Home Address 


1935 


Lesley School 


West Concord 


1943 


Framingham Normal 


Acton 


1943 


Fitchburg Normal 


Stow 


1906 


Fitchbui'g Normal 


South Acton 


1927 


Fitchburg Normal 


South Acton 


1940 


Fitchburg State College 


South Acton 


1935 


Fitchburg State College 


West Acton 


1938 


Fitchburg State College 


South Acton 


1943 


Fitchburg Normal 


South Acton 


1935 


Harvard University 
Boston University 


West Acton 


1928 


Dartmouth College 
Boston University 


East Acton 


1943 


Bridgewater State Coll. 


South Acton 


1942 


Colby College 


West Acton 


1929 


Burdett College 


West Acton 


1943 


New Hampshire Univ. 


South Acton 


1942 


Gorham Normal 


West Acton 


1930 


Northeastern Law School West Acton 


1931 


Simmons College 


South Acton 


1943 








Boston University 


West Acton 


1943 


Colby College 


West Acton 


1943 


Boston University 


West Acton 


1921 


Smith College 


Concord 


1943 


B. U. Sargent College 


South Acton 


1943 


Mass. School of Art 


Maynard 


1941 


Longy School of Music 


Watertown 



—116— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Voters of Acton : 

The school committee herewith presents its report for 
the year 1943 together with the report of the superintendent 
of schools, which has been accepted by the committee. 

The committee as a whole has worked in complete 
unison and has tried at all times to give you the very best 
service they could possibly render. 

The schools have lost many fine teachers to the armed 
services but we feel that the new teachers obtained to fill 
these vacancies are and will be a credit to the Acton school 
system. 

During the summer vacation the committee decided 
that due to the apparent seriousness of the fuel situation it 
V\^ould be good judgment to buy and have delivered the 
complete winter's supply of fuel for all school buildings. 
One year's supply was delivered and this will assure the 
people of Acton that the schools will not be in any danger 
of being without fuel. This fuel was supplied by local com- 
panies. 

During the year the pupils of all schools have done re- 
markable work in the purchasing of war bonds and stamps 
Diid the parents and pupils should be congratulated. 

Due to O. D. T. rulings the bus service this past year 
Ird to be cut in places. At the present time these routes 
vre in the process of being lengthened and as rules are re- 
laxed, will be lengthened more. The parents, pupils, and 
bus contractor co-operated with the committee splendidly 
on this matter. 

The committee voted to give diplomas to all seniors in 
service and presented these to their mothers at the gradua- 
tion exercises in June 1943. 



—117— 

During the year a survey was made of the lighting sys- 
tem in the grade schools by a lighting engineer of Boston, 
Massachusetts. The lighting was found to be very inade- 
quate and one room in the South School was equipped with 
new fluorescent lights. The committee would like to have 
the parents look at these lights and the committee has a 
special article in the Town Warrant asking for $1,500 to 
install this type of lighting in all class rooms of the grade 
schools. 

The high school roof, which has needed constant at- 
tention, will need a complete new covering and a special 
article has been put in the Town Warrant for $1,500 for 
this work. 

Shop work in the Industrial Arts Department is very 
essential in these times due to war industries. The present 
equipment needs replacement and some is not safe. The 
committee is asking, through a special article in the Town 
Warrant, for $1,500 to be granted to make this department 
practical and efficient. 

In closing, the committee wishes to thank the parents, 
pupils, and teachers for the fine co-operation given them 
during the year 1943. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER B. STEVENS, 

Chairman. 



Comparison of Net Cost of Acton Schools 

Received by Town Treasurer on account of schools: 

1942 1943 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
General School Fund, Part 1 
(State aid on account of 
teachers' salaries) $4,519.00 $4,553.00 



—US- 
Tuition of State Wards (full) 1,315.39 1,222.01 
Vocational Education — 
Arthur A. Hansen Trade 
School and Waltham Part- 
time Co-operative School 

(one-half) 212.40 137.78 

City of Boston, tuition of wards 172.26 184.68 

Town of Boxboro, tuition 1,600.00 2,856.11 

Town of Westford, tuition 132.12 335.09 

Boston Typewriter Company 
5 typewriters sold to U. S. 
Treasury Department Pro- 
curement Program 190.00 

Total received $7,951.17 $9,478.67 

Appropriated $52,100.00 $58,000.00 

Spent from appropriation 52,080.83 57,990.92 

Received by town treasurer .... 7,951.17 9,478.67 

Net cost $44,129.66 $48,512.25 

Notes : 

1. Receipts were larger in 1943 chiefly because of 

a. Increased tuition rates. 

b. Increase in Boxboro students from 17 to 20. 

c. Sale of 5 typewriters to the U. S. Treasury De- 

partment. 

2. The net cost of education in Acton in 1942 was 
15% less than the amount appropriated. In 1943, 
although the appropriation was increased $5,900, 
the net cost was still 15% less than the amount ap- 
propriated. 

3. In comparing the school costs in 1942 and 1943, 
the increase in appropriation was $5,900 but the 
increase in net cost was only $4,382.59. 



—119— 

ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Proposed Budget for 1944 

1943 1944 

2. Supt. and General Expense $2,500 $2,500 

3. Supervisors (3) 3,550 4,124 

4. Principals 

High 1,200 1,300 

Elementary (3) 4,940 4,980 

5. Teachers 

High (12) 21,140 21,340 

Elementary (6) 9,410 8,760 

6. Textbooks 700 986 

7. Stationery and Misc. Supplies .... 1,350 1,200 

8. Wages of Janitors 3,840 4,440 

9. Fuel 2,180 2,180 

10. Janitor Supplies and Power 1,200 1,200 

11. Repairs 500 600 

12. Libraries 200 200 

13. Health 300 300 

14. Transportation 4,750 4,750 

15. Sundries 140 140 

16. Vocational Education 100 

$58,000 $59,000 

Paid For Support For Year Ending December 21, 1943 

Superintendent, Salary and Traveling Expenses $ 2,033.44 
Office Expenses 548.60 

Total General Control $ 2,582.04 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors' Salaries, Art, Music, Physical 

Education 3,129.29 

High School Principal's Salary 1,199.92 

High School Teachers, Salaries 20,640.31 



—120— 

Elementary Principals, Salaries . : 4,905.01 

Elementary Teachers, Salaries 8,256.94 



$38,131.47 

High School Textbooks 562.56 

Elementary Textbooks 717.84 

High School Stationery and Supplies 929.37 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies 378.75 



$ 2,588.52 



High School Operating Expenses 

Janitor $ 1,553.46 

Fuel 1,661.92 

Miscellaneous 891.68 



$ 4,107.06 



Elementary Operating Expenses 

Janitors $ 2,523.92 

Fuel . 1,406.35 

Miscellaneous 587.23 

$ 4,517.50 

Total Operating Expenses 8,624.56 

High School Maintenance and Repairs .... 457.40 

Elementary Maintenance and Repairs .... 210.70 

Total Maintenance and Repairs 668.10 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health, High $ 125.00 

Health, Elementary 125.00 

Libraries, High 185.83 

Transportation 4,750.00 



—121— 

Vocational Education 52.62 

Miscellaneous Expenses, High 157.78 



$ 5,396.23 
Total Expended $57,990.92 



Unexpended Balance 9.08 



Appropriation $58,000.00 

Report of the Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee of Acton, Massachusetts 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit my third annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1943. 

In March, 1943, Mrs. Arthur Eraser of South Acton 
was elected to serve one year to complete the term of 
Mrs. Hazel O. Bundy. Mrs. G. Howard Reed and Mr. 
Waldo J. Flint of West Acton were elected for three- 
year terms. At the organization meeting Mr. Walter B. 
Stevens was elected chairman and the superintendent was 
elected clerk of the school committee. 

Teachers 

Since January 1, 1943, the following teachers have 
left Acton : Mr. Robert T. Roy (to become principal of 
the Sippeican School in Marion, Mass.), Mrs. Louisa Jordan 
(resigned), Mr. Howard A. Libby (change of vocation). 
Miss Helen Connell (to teach in West Bridgewater), Mr. 
Kalervo Kansanniva (Army), Miss Bartlett (to be mar- 
ried), Miss Eynon (to teach in Winsted, Conn.), Mr. Harris 
(to teach in Concord, Mass.), Mr. Ralph Hayes (Army), 
Miss Rosemary O'Neill (to teach in Arlington, Mass.), Miss 
Constance Russo (to teach in Waltham, Mass.), and Miss 



—122— 

Florence Reed (to be married). This is a total of 12 teach- 
ers, one-half of our staff. 

The following teachers were appointed, six of whom 
are married women with considerable experience : Mrs. 
Dardana Berry, Center School, Grades 5 and 6 ; Mrs. 
Catherine Archer, Center School, Grades 1 and 2 ; Mrs. 
Carrie F. Wells, West School, Grades 1 and 2 ; Miss Norma 
E. Leppanen, French and English; Mrs. Mary Emerson, 
home economics; Mr. Richard E. Bradford, acting vice- 
principal of the junior high school, coaching and social 
studies; Mrs. Barbara Kunhardt, commercial subjects; Miss 
Henrietta Schmidt, junior high school subjects; Miss Dor- 
othy Beers, physical education supervisor; Miss Florence 
Reed and Mrs. Jeanne Toohey, art supervisors. A total 
of 11 teachers was appointed. 

Several elementary teachers attended a conference on 
methods at the Bridgewater Teachers College and two high 
school teachers are part-time students at the Boston Uni- 
versity School of Education. 

Custodians 

Mr. Carl Anderson was transferred from the West 
School to the high school, in a new position combining the 
work of custodian, attendance officer, and school depart- 
ment transportation. Mr. Ernest G. Banks took charge 
of the West School. Mr. Ralph Rogers resigned at the 
Center School to enter technical defense work and Mr. 
Harry E. Holt became custodian. 

Salaries 

On April 5 the school committee voted to pay all reg- 
ular teachers and principals a war allowance of $200 in 
1943. The committee again comes before the town with a 
budget including the war allowance. 

During the Summer of 1943 the state legislature made 



—123— 

$1200 the legal minimum salary for teachers and the school 
committee was obliged to meet this requirement on Jan- 
uary 1, 1944. 

Financial 

Your attention is directed to the net cost of our schools 
rather than to the amount appropriated. In 1943 the ap- 
propriation was $58,000, but the net cost was only $48,- 
512.25. The amount received by the town on account of 
schools was $9,478.67, about 15% of the appropriation, 
the receipts being listed earlier in this report under ''Com- 
parison of Net Cost of Acton Schools." 

The committee asks for $59,000 in 1944, $1,000 more 
than last year. Several factors explain this increase : the 
new legal minimum salary, the need to bring our textbooks 
up to date, and the automatic annual step raises for new 
teachers, of whom there were eleven in 1943. 

Special Articles 
1. Payments to Massachusetts Teachers* Retirement 
Board of $277.88. 

This special article complies with Section 9 of Chapter 
708 of the Acts of 1941 and Section 9A of said Chapter 
708, as inserted by Chapter 419 of the Acts of 1943: An 
Act Providing for Special Funds to meet the Liability of 
the Commonwealth and Political Subdivisions thereof to 
Pay Contributions to Contributory Retirement Systems on 
Account of Members thereof in the Military or Naval Serv- 
ice. '*In order to provide funds to carry out the provisions 
of section nine, there shall be appropriated . . . annually, 
in the case of cities, towns, and districts, sums equal to not 
less than one-half of the amount which would have been 
paid by members on military leave of absence referred to 
in said section nine had they remained in the service of the 
commonwealth or of a political subdivision thereof during 
the preceding budgetary period." 



—124— 

The contributions are to be paid on account of the 
estate of Theodore H. Ehrhardt, and on account of Robert 
L. Perry, Roger T. Walsh, John Mitcliell, Kalervo Kansan- 
niva, and Ralph B. Hayes. 

2. Metal- Working Machines for High School Indus- 
trial Arts Shop — $1500. 

Four bench machines are needed, as reported last year, 
which are listed in order of preference : grinder, lathe, 
shaper, and milling machine. Students in service report 
how practical our pre-induction shopwork has been. Metal 
work could be taught in Grades 7-12. Priorities are avail- 
able for these machines, which were recommended by the 
service representative of a nationally known school shop 
equipment concern. The estimated cost includes the addi- 
tional wiring necessary. 

3. Fluorescent Lighting in Elementary Classrooms — 
$1500. 

For several years the superintendent's report has men- 
tioned the inadequate lighting with 100-watt incandescent 
lamps. The fluorescent fixtures are guaranteed to give ade- 
quate light without glare or shadow in all parts of the room. 

4. New High School Roof Covering — $1500. 

For several years the town has been reminded that 
the high school roof leaks. Some flashings are needed to 
replace the Toncan metal flashings originally installed. The 
felt is low and exposed in spots so that parts of the roof 
do not drain, especially during a driving storm or follow- 
ing a heavy snow fall. 

Consolidated Elementary School 

A consolidated elementary school has been under con- 
sideration since 1928 and the matter is being brought again 
to the attention of the town. The school committee rec- 



—125— 

ommends consideration of a consolidated school and is ready 
to co-operate with the local committee representing the 
Massachusetts Emergency Public Works Commission (Mr. 
Albert P. Jenks, Chairman, Mr. Richard F. Deane, and 
Mr. Forrest E. Bean). Considerable interest in a consoli- 
dated school was shown by the town in 1938, when a pro- 
posal to build was defeated by a small margin. 

The chief advantages in a consolidated school will be 
economy of maintenance and improvement of instruction. 
The three elementary schools, all about 60 years old, are 
rated as third class construction. For three buildings there 
are 5 hot air and 4 steam heaters, costly to operate. Al- 
though the elementary schools and the high school have 
about the same number of students, the elementary schools 
cost about $19,000 more to operate between 1926 and 1936. 

Instruction for two grades in one room can not be 
what it should be, particularly in Grades 1 and 2. In the 
West School at present there are 42 pupils in these grades 
in charge of one teacher. 



War and the High School Program 

Several changes in the high school program caused by 
the war were listed last year. These changes are still in 
effect, with two exceptions, and further improvements have 
been made. 

1. Standard Red Cross Home Nursing Course required 
for senior girls and Standard Red Cross First Aid 
Course required for junior girls. Fifteen first aid 
certificates awarded at graduation. 

2. Eight diplomas granted senior boys in service. 

3. Arrangement for John Nichols to complete his 
high school course while in the Navy through the 
U. S. Armed Forces Institute and earn a diploma. 



—126— 

4. Minute Man Flag earned for the high school be- 
cause 90% of the students bought war stamps 
and bonds in one month. Sales are made at noon 
by members of the Salesmanship and Business Or- 
ganization classes under the direction of Mrs. 
Kunhardt, the commercial teacher. Each elemen- 
tary school also earned the Minute Man Flag. 



In Memoriam 

Theodore Herman Ehrhardt, former principal of the 
West School, was killed in action June 4, 1943 in the Latin- 
American area. He was leading a Ferry Command Squad- 
ron from Texas to the Panama Canal Zone. 

Lieutenant Ehrhardt was educated in the schools of 
Whitman and received his master's degree at Bridgewater 
State Teachers' College. He also studied at Harvard and 
Boston University. Enlisting in July, 1941, he received pre- 
liminary training at Spartan Field, Oklahoma, basic train- 
ing in Brady, Texas, and advanced training at Kelly Field, 
Texas. 

Following his graduation from Kelly Field, where he 
was commissioned a second lieutenant in February, 1942, 
he married the former Dorothy Cushman, also a teacher. 
Shortly afterward he was assigned as flight instructor in 
South America. Later he was stationed with the Ferry 
Command at Love Field, Texas, where he was promoted 
to first lieutenant. 

The following paragraph was part of a letter sent by 
the school committee to Mr. Ehrhardt's wife and mother. 

''Mr. Ehrhardt was considered a valued member of 
the staff, particularly in West Acton where he was prin- 
cipal of the elementary school. His friendly attitude, his 
loyal support of our schools, and his interest in music and 
dramatics are strongly impressed on the minds of Acton 
people." 



—127— 

Plans have been made to place a picture of Mr. Ehr- 
hardt, with a suitable inscription, in the West School. Con- 
tributions will be made by students who knew him. 

In Memoriam 

Robert Lynne Townsend, who graduated from Acton 
High School in 1941, died of wounds at Bougainville in 
November, 1943. He was president of his junior class, 
president of student council, and a member of the football 
team, glee club, Torch staff, and traffic squad. The present 
student council members all signed a note of sympathy sent 
to his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Lynne P. Townsend of Well- 
fleet, Massachusetts. 



Plans have also been made to place a picture of "Bob" 
Townsend, suitably inscribed, in the high school building. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

A high academic standard is maintained. Acton High 
School is rated a Class A high school by the state depart- 
ment of education and is approved by the New England 
College Admissions Board. Students from our school with a 
B average are admitted to 14 New England Colleges with- 
out examination. Eligibility for school activities requires 
a passing grade in studies, a mark of 1 in attitude towards 
school work and a mark of satisfactory in conduct. 

Graduates in 1943 now attend Radcliffe, Massachusetts 
State College, Becker Junior College, Westbrook Junior 
College, and the Cambridge Hospital School of Nursing. 
Eight boys are in service and one girl is in the U. S. Cadet 
Nurse Corps. Three scholarships were awarded: $50 and 
$5 by the Acton Center Woman's Club to Jean Elizabeth 
Campbell and Kathleen Mary Feehan on entering nursing, 
and $100 by the Acton High School Scholarship Fund to 
Helen Elizabeth Burroughs. The sympathetic leadership of 
Miss Towne, the senior adviser, and the guidance work of 
Mr. Holt, the vice-principal, contribute greatly to the suc- 
cess of our graduates. 



—128— 

Acton High School Scholarship Fund 

For the year ending December 31, 1943, contributions 
amounting to $118.95 were received from the Class of 1943, 
the West Acton Woman's Club and the Parent-Teacher 
Association. The balance is $522.59. The trustees have 
taken steps to add an amendment to Article III of the dec- 
laration of trust so that current contributions may be used 
as a scholarship up to $100 a year. 

Parent-Teacher Association 

The P.-T. A. continues its interest in school affairs. 
The annual declamation contest was held as a school as- 
sembly, with prizes of $5, $3, and $2 in war stamps. A 
further contribution of $33.94 to the Stage Equipment Fund 
made it possible to install permanent drapes on the stage, a 
great improvement in Blanchard Hall. 

Health 

Dental work is greatly needed but the school clinic 
cannot yet be set up again. An effort is being made to have 
the children see the dentist twice a year and bring to school 
the state department of public health dental certificate. 
Dental care is also stressed in the physical education pro- 
gram. 

Conant Library 

During 1943 the high school library has rceeived many 
gifts from townspeople : the latest edition of Encyclopedia 
Americana (30 volumes), a collection of historical refer- 
ence books, over 150 copies of Fortune magazine, and funds 
to purchase about 50 volumes of standard and recent litera- 
ture for outside reading assignments. 

Athletic Association 

Considering the transportation problems and the short- 
age of boys, all athletic teams co-operated wholeheartedly 
with the coaches: Miss O'Neill, Miss Beers, Mr. Hayes, Mr. 



129- 



Kansanniva, and Mr. Bradford. Many fine games have 
been held. Under the direction of Mr. Holt, Faculty Mana- 
ger of Athletics, the students improved last year's maga- 
zine sales with a total of $915.00, v^hich gave the school 
$309.00 for athletic purposes. The balance on December 
31, 1943 v^as $407.73. 

Textbooks 

Some progress has been made in bringing the text- 
books up to date, including readers in Grades 1 and 2, 
English in Grades 3-8, Science in Grades 7 and 8, all high 
school mathematics, Civics and World History in Grades 
9 and 10, and pre-induction shop courses. New texts 
needed are Geographies in Grades 4-7, Music for all grades, 
readers for Grade 3, Science for Grades 3-6, Dictionaries 
for Grade 8, and Arithmetics for Grades 4-6. In 1945 
probably all our textbooks will be up to date. 

Fuel 

The elementary remedial teaching position was closed 
in February 1943, and the unexpended salary was used, 
with the balance in the budget available for fuel, to pur- 
chase the entire 1943-44 fuel during the Summer. Here- 
after, the committee plans to purchase fuel for the entire 
school year during the preceding Summer. 

Co-operation 

A spirit of co-operation on the part of teachers and 
pupils has insured the success of many auxiliary school 
activities. Over 700 phonograph records were gathered 
to assist the American Legion in its campaign to release new 
records for service men. Various 4-H clubs made and sold 
Christmas greens to benefit the Camp Middlesex Fund for 
a new well. The profits were $86.35. The Art, Home 
Economics, and Industrial Arts Departments have made 
many practical articles for service men under the direction 
of the Junior Red Cross, to which students contributed over 
$30. 



—ISO- 
Home and School 

Members of the school department appreciate the con- 
tinued co-operation of parents and pupils. Teachers are 
glad to discuss with parents at any time the progress of 
their children. 

I want to thank all members of the school department 
and the school committee for their support and encourage- 
ment during a year of many changes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD B. GREENMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Reports of Special Departments 
Physical Training 

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

The health and physical fitness program is being carried 
on in the schools to meet the needs of our youth in this 
present war. It is the purpose of this program to develop 
strength, endurance, agility and co-ordination. This is 
accomplished through cpnditioning exercises, rhythmical 
work, health instruction, and vigorous activities in the form 
of sports and games. 

The elementary school program includes exercises, 
story plays, mimetics, rhythmical activities, relay races, 
hunting, and athletic games. All of these activities em- 
phasize good posture and good health. 

In both the junior and senior high school the majority 
of girls have two periods per week of physical education 
plus the extra-curricular sports. Evei:y student is given a 
physical examination and physical education is required for 
every girl except those excused by a doctor. Included in 
the girls' program are exercises, folk dancing, stunts and 
tumbling, modern dancing, and the fundamentals of the 
various team sports. 



—131— 

The extra-curricular sports — field hockey, basketball, 
and Softball — include team participation in both intra-mural 
and inter-scholastic competition. Tumbling, hiking, and 
skating are also part of the extra-curricular program. 

Posture is emphasized in all classes and tests are given 
with suggestions for improvement. Health instruction and 
lectures are also included in this program. 

A special gymnastic uniform is required of all girls as 
a part of the class attendance. Hot and cold showers are 
also compulsory after all activity classes. 

Suggestions : 

1. Warm sweat suits purchased by the athletic asso- 
ciation for school team players. 

2. Addition of individual sports equipment. 

3. Building of tennis courts behind school for class 
and extra-curricular use. 

The physical education demonstration will be held 
again this year at the high school on May 12, 1944. 

Dorothy Beers. 

HIGH SCHOOL BOYS 

The boys' physical fitness classes started early in Sep- 
tember with definite aims: health improvement, co- 
ordination of all parts of the body, ability to give and take, 
and improvement of general morale through competitive 
games. 

Each boy in Grades 9-12, following a physical exami- 
nation by the school doctor, has two periods (90 min.) per 
week of physical exercise plus 4-6 hours per week of extra 
activities work after school for those who wish to take part. 
Grade 7 and 8 boys have at least one period (two periods if 
weather permits) per week of directed exercises and games. 



—132— 

All boys 'classes are held outdoors whenever the 
weather permits. They consist of calisthenics, tumbling, 
wrestling, and open-hand boxing, relays, close-order drill, 
road running, and the give and take of bodily contact as 
used in touch and tackle football, soccer, and basketball. 

Much of the work carried on is recommended by the 
physical fitness experts of our U. S. Army as conditioning 
work. 

Competitive 11-man football games were had with 
Middlesex, Concord, and Maynard. In basketball, under 
strict eligibility rules, we have scheduled at least a dozen 
games with surrounding schools. Baseball and track, in 
the Spring, will be planned if leisure time allows and if 
schedules can be arranged. 

Skills as developed by our boys will be demonstrated 
to the public in Blanchard Hall on the evening of May 12, 
at 7.30 p. m. 

Richard E. Bradford. 

Music 

My third annual report as supervisor of music in the 
Acton Public Schools is herewith submitted. 

After two and a half years of instruction, observation, 
and recommendation, I am glad to report that I have suc- 
ceeded in establishing a sound and adequate music program 
in our Acton Schools. I am happy to present to you the fol- 
lowing progress made by our music department. 

A. Progress 

1. Established a course of harmony in the high school. 

2. Organized a high school band. 

3. Established a regular music appreciation program 
in the elementary schools. 

4. Organized elementary instrumental class instruc- 
tion. Thirty-one pupils are receiving instrumen- 
tal instruction, seventeen more than last year. 



—133— 

B. Instruments Acquired 

1. Two clarinets purchased. 

2. One violin given by Arthur LaRoche of South 
Acton. 

C. Contribution to the Community 

by the Music Department 

1. Part of the orchestra performed for a benefit 
bazaar. 

2. The chorus sang in the Town Hall at the Honor 
Roll Dedication. 

3. A group of high school singers and instrumental- 
ists sang and played Christmas carols in different 
parts of the town. 

D. Public Performance 

1. Annual music festival in April. 

2. High school orchestra performed at graduation, a 
Parent-Teacher Association meeting, and the sen- 
ior play. 

The morale of all groups is excellent. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the school 
committee, the superintendent, and the townspeople for 
their splendid co-operation, without which our music pro- 
gram could not succeed. 

Charles K. Yeremian. 

Art 

The basic instruction in art education and appreciation 
is outlined below. 

In the first three grades, emphasis is placed upon crea- 
tive self-expression in design and in illustration. This em- 
phasis is continued through the fourth and sixth grades 
with greater stress upon knowledge of design principles, 
elements of color theory, and perspective. Appreciation 



—134— 

is emphasized in the seventh and ninth grades. The senior 
high school students study principles and theory further and 
concentrate upon the branch of art study most desired by 
the student. 

Hectographed outlines with sketches, and sometimes 
samples of the lessons, are given to each grade teacher at 
the first of every month. 

Correlation v^ith other studies is introduced v^rhen pos- 
sible. 

In all grades, most of the month of December was de- 
voted to construction work, design and illustration, and 
making useful objects for Christmas decoration and gifts. 

Some work was done for the Red Cross this year. 

The posters for the senior high school play, "Plane 
Crazy," were made by the eighth grade and placed in store 
windows around Acton and the surrounding towns. 

Jeanne Toohey. 

Industrial Arts 

The primary purpose of the schools of today is to give 
our youth a good general education. To attain this goal, 
definite subjects must be offered such as English, History, 
Science, Industrial Arts, and many others. 

In our Acton High School Industrial Arts Department, 
general industrial training is offered under the units in 
woodworking, metal working, electricity, mechanical draw- 
ing, home mechanics, and two pre-induction training 
courses: fundamentals of shopwork and fundamentals of 
electricity, as approved by the War Department. 

The outstanding value of metal working is quite ap- 
parent in the present day struggle to supply machines and 
materials to our fighting forces. Under metal working, 
machine shop practice stands out in importance both voca- 
tionally and avocationally. Our own machine shop unit 



—135— 

would be enriched greatly and be quite complete with the 
addition of a power grinder, lathe with quick-change gears, 
shaper, and milling machine. All of these machines are 
recommended to be of the bench variety due to available 
shop space. 

The 7th and 8th grades are now given two double 
periods per week, thus doubling their shopwork time and 
credit. Prepared courses prevail in the high school grades 
giving students five credits to'ward graduation for each year 
of successful completion of work in industrial arts. 

Projects being made for the local unit of the Junior Red 
Cross include a book wagon, lamp stand, floor lamp, table 
lamp, dart game, fox and geese game, ping pong paddles, 
and several lapboards and writing boards. 

In closing, I wish to express my appreciation to the 
school board, Mr. Greenman, and all others, who have aided 
me in the industrial arts work for the past year. 

Wilbert H. Hayes. 



—136— 

School Membership and Attendance 

Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1943 

Boys Age 

Grade 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Ttl 



1 


15 


16 1 












32 


2 




4 18 2 












24 


3 




7 12 


2 










21 


4 




5 


7 3 










15 


5 






7 11 


5 1 






• 


24 


6 






5 


8 11 








15 


7 








6 13 7 2 








28 


8 








6 14 5 




1 




26 


9 








3 11 


5 


1 




20 


10 








3 


3 


3 


1 


10 


11 










3 


6 


2 


11 


12 












1 


4 


1 6 



232 















— 


-137 


r 














Girls 








~ 






Age 
















Gr. 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 Ttl 


1 9 


13 


2 
























24 


2 


2 


25 


1 






















28 


3 




11 


6 




1 


















18 


4 






4 


13 


3 


1 
















21 


5 






1 


4 


18 


1 
















24 


6 










9 


12 


2 


2 












25 


7 












9 


12 


4 












25 


8 














5 


11 


2 










18 


9 
















8 


17 


3 


1 






29 


10 


















5 


15 


5 






25 


11 




















11 


8 






19 


12 






















6 


8 


3 


1 18 



274 



—IBS- 
REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Richard B. Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as school phy- 
sician. 

The annual physical examinations were completed in 
November. 

In January there were a number of cases of German 
measles in the Center School and Chicken Pox in the West 
School in March. Neither reached the epidemic stage. 

Immunization clinics for diphtheria were held in May 
and early June. 

I have had the hearty co-operation of the superin- 
tendent, nurse, and teachers, for which I am grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



—ISO- 
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Richard Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report for the school year ending 
December 31, 1943. The physical examinations of all school 
pupils with special attention given to pupils in competitive 
sports was made by Doctor Mayell. Notices were sent to 
parents for all defects which should have attention. 

The Board of Health and school physician carried on 
the usual diphtheria preventative clinic, Schicking 68 pupils. 
Of this number 22 were negative, the rest were given toxoid 
injections. 

The pre-school conference was held in June ; 30 chil- 
dren came for examination for entrance to school in Sep- 
tember. 

There were some measles, chicken pox, and a few 
scarlet fever cases during the year but not to the epidemic 
extent. During the Winter months there were the usual 
prevalent colds. 

May I, at this time, express my thanks for the support 
given me by the teachers and superintendent? 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F. TAYLOR, R. N. 



—140— 

ACTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Graduation Program 

Friday, June 11, 1943 

High School Auditorium at 8.00 p. m. 

Entrance March of Seniors 

*Tomp and Circumstance" Elgard 

Invocation 

The Reverend Arthur H. Wilde 

Salutatory 

Helen Elizabeth ^Burroughs 

Essay — "The Four Freedoms" 
Kathleen Mary Feehan 

Girls' Glee Club 

**Ciribiribin" A. Pestalozza 

"The Omnipotence" Franz Schubert 

Essay — "Air Raid Precautions in a Rural District" 
Francis Michael Collins 

Trumpet Solo 

"Serenade" Franz Schubert 

James Francis McAvenia 

Presentation of Class Gift 

James Francis McAvenia 
President of Senior Class 

Essay and Valedictory 

"Nursing as a Career" 

Jean Elizabeth Campbell 

Class Song 

Words: Marion Elizabeth Nichols 
Music : James Francis McAvenia 



-141- 



Presentation of Awards 

Supt. Richard B. Greenman 

National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Mr. Walter B. Stevens 
Chairman of School Committee 

Final March — ''March Magnificant" A. H. McConnell 

Reception to Graduates in Science Room 



—142— 
GRADUATES, 1943 



**Fred T. Bird, Jr. 

** Charles Walley Boy^r, Jr. 
*Helen Elizabeth Burroughs 

Mary Elizabeth Byron 
*Jean Elizabeth Campbell 
Francis Michael Collins 
Anna Emila Theresa Coulter 

**Cornelius Chas. Cullinane 
Patricia S. Curley 
Dawn Viola Dagenais 
Margaret Elizabeth Davis '- 
Shirley Rita Durand 
Natacha Farley 
* Kathleen Mary Feehan 
Margaret Mary Gallagher 

** Norman Richard Gilbert 

** David Warren Hartwell 
Katherine Frances Hayes 
Barbara Anne Horton 
Florence Elizabeth Larrabee 

* Honor Students 
** In the Service 



Ralph Perkins Marble 

* Dominic Alexander Marini 
James Francis McAvenia 

*Marcia Snowden McCabe 

Elizabeth Merriam 

Robert Murray 

Marion Elizabeth Nichols 
■=* George Pedersen 

Edgar Howard Peterson 

Richard Haskell Peterson 
"''Alvin R. Piper 

* Virginia Lee Richardson 
Charles Albert Smith 

-Phyllis Starbuck 
Eleanour Virginia Stevens 
Phyllis M. Stuart 
William Henry Stuart 
•=* Charles Raymond Sweet 
Charles Frederick Willett 
Karolvn Frances Wilde 



Awards at Graduation: 

American Legion Medal, awarded by Edwards- 
Quimby Post to the senior boy and girl outstanding in 
scholarship, loyalty, and achievement: Virginia Lee 
Richardson, James Francis McAvenia. 

Washington-Franklin Medal, awarded by the Massa- 
chusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion for the best record in American History: Marcia 
Snowden McCabe. 



143- 



$25 War Bonds, awarded by Mrs. Robert Reid, Jr., to 
a senior boy and girl showing the greatest scholastic 
improvement in the past four years and a co-operative 
attitude through service to the school : Karolyn Frances 
Wilde, Dominic Alexander Marini. 



INDEX 

Assessors 41 

Board of Health 44 

Cemetery Commissioners 37 

Dog Officer 62 

Elizabeth White Fund 52 

Finance Committee 58 

Fire Department 49 

Forest Warden 50 

Inspector of Animals 42 

Librarian's Report 40 

Middlesex County Extension Service 38 

Moth Control 61 

Post-War Public Works Committee 41 

Sealer's Report 38 

Selectmen's Report 14 

Schools : 

Budget for 1944 119 

Graduation Program 140 

Organization Ill 

School Committee 116 

School Nurse 139 

School Physician 138 

Superintendent 121 

Teachers 115 



Special Town Meeting (Abstract) Sept. 27, 1943 22 

Superintendent of Streets 71 

State Auditor's Report 99 

Tax Collector 52 

Town Accountant 75 

Town Clerk's Report 24 

Births 25 

Marriages 28 

Deaths 31 

Non-Resident Burials 33 

Dog Licenses 35 

Jury List (Revised) 1943 36 

Town Forest Committee 51 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 8, 1943 16 

Town Nurse 46 

Town Officers 9 

Treasurer's Report 63 

Tree Warden 61 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 43 

Police 48 

Public Welfare 47 

War Price and Rationing Board 72 

Warrant, Monday, March 6, 1944 3 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 40 



■■t««tiAAA«T«A -*— *"*- - ' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 
1944 



L ,«—«„»- -«- -»- -»- -»- -«- -•- -•- -«- -»- -«- -■- -»- -«- -»--•- -«-■■■■»■■»■-«-■■■-»- -»- ■•- ■«■ 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 
1944 



WAHineu) 



TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex ss. 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the 
transaction of town affairs, to meet in their respective pre- 
cincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the fifth day of March, 1945, 
by posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each 
of the places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at 
least before the fifth day of March. To bring in their votes 
on one ballot for the following town officers: 

Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of 
taxes, one selectman for three years; one assessor for three 



years ; one member of the board of public welfare for three 
years; four constables for one year; one cemetery commis- 
sioner for three years; two members of the school commit- 
tee for three years ; one member of the board of health for 
three years; one trustee Memorial Library for three years; 
and a tree warden. ' 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 
8 o'clock p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Com- 
monwealth to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, 
as aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton on 
Monday, the twelfth day of March, at 7:30 o'clock p. m. 
Then and there to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and 
committees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committee chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $250.00 or some other ?um for the 
observance of Memorial Day, this sum to be expended under 
the direction of a committee appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1945, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The amount 



spent for board and disposal of dogs will be reimbursed by 
the County of Middlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$875.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Ac- 
count, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 or any other sum to be 
used by the Town Forest Committee for the purpose of 
purchasing additional forest land or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $500.00 or any other sum from the Surplus 
Revenue Account for the work of the Post-War Public 
Works Committee, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $550.00 for repairs on the town 
roller, or act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 for repairs to the build- 
ings now used by the Highway Department, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $100.00 to defray the necessary 
expenses of office supplies, etc., in connection with the ad- 
ministration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent 
Children and General Relief, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to purchase new hose and 
tiiree (3) lire alarm boxes, or act anything thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
ti'ie Board of Selectmen to approve bills to the amount of 
$1,500.00 for the furnishing and installing of fluorescent 
lights in some rooms of the elementary schools, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $77.80 to pay the balance due on the installa- 
tion of fluorescent lighting in the elementary schools. 



— 6— 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the additional sum of $1,550.00 to complete the 
fluorescent lighting in all elementary classrooms, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 17. To see what sum of money the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and 
usual expenses of the several departments of the town and 
determine how the same shall be raised. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to have an annual audit of the various 
accounts of the town or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,800.00 so that the Board of 
Health may contract for the collection and disposal of gar- 
bage for the period of one year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the Tree Department 
for the replacement of shade trees, or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $600.00 for the purchase of a power 
tractor and attachments for the Highway Department, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $400.00 for a compressor for the 
Cemetery Department, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to accept 
the Honor Roll which was presented by the Citizens of the 
Town of Acton on November 28, 1943, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
gift of $1,500.00 made to the Town of Acton by the will 
of the late Miss Charlotte B. Conant. Said sum to be kept 
as a fund and the income thereof used for the purchase of 
new books for the High School Library to be selected by 
the principal and the heads of the English and History De- 
partments of the High School, or act anything thereon. 



Article 25. To see if the town will accept as a town 
way or street, that road known as Pine Street, westerly 
about 250 feet off Main Street, as shown on a plan filed in 
the office of the town clerk, or act anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of three to report at 
the next annual or special town meeting regarding the ad- 
visability of purchasing a truck for the Highway Depart- 
ment, or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of five to be known 
as the Acton War Record Committee, whose duty it shall be 
to compile a permanent record of all men and women of 
Acton in the military service of the United States or of any 
of its Allies in the present World War. This committee to 
have full power of filling vacancies or enlarging the mem- 
bership of the committee and that such moneys for the 
use of the committee as the Selectmen deem necessary from 
time to time be made available to the committee by the 
selectmen or the Finance Committee from any funds within 
their control. This committee to report at the next annual 
town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of five to investigate 
and submit a set of Zoning Laws at the next annual or a 
special town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of five to investigate 
and submit a set of Building Laws at the next annual or a 
special town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to elect by 
the town meeting a school Building Committee of three, 
working with the School Committee and the Superintendent, 
to survey the elementary school needs of the town, secure 
plans, and discover the cost of a central 8-grade elementary 
school, including sub-primary department, and the cost of 



— 8— 

three new 8-grade elementary schools, including sub- 
primary department, one in each precinct; and to see if 
the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$500.00 for the use of the School Building Committee, and 
instruct it to report to the town at the next annual or a 
special town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of three to investi- 
gate and recommend the advisability of insuring all or any 
part of the town buildings and equipment and report at the 
next annual or a special town meeting, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $2,500.00 from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve 
Fund or act anything thereon. 

Article 33. To see if the town will appropriate from 
the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the Staters and 
County's allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 
90, provided that the reimbursement from the State and 
County be credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account 
or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof, fail not and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the 
time of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this tenth day of 
January, 1945. 

ARTHUR W. LEE, 
LAWRENCE DONNELLY, 
GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

A true copy. Attest: 

ROBERT G. WILLETT, 

Constable of Acton. 



— 9— 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Moderator 

Albert P. Durkee 

Selectmen 

Arthur W. Lee Term expires 1945 

George S. Braman Term expires 1946 

Lawrence Donnelly Term expires 1947 

Town Clerk 

Harlan E. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

* Clare A. Milbery Term expires 1945 

Carl C. Flint Term expires 1946 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1947 

** James W. Baker 

*Resigned **Elected to replace* 

Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Benjamin J. Ineson Term expires 1945 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1946 

Walter B. Stevens Term expires 1947 

Constables 

Samuel E. Knowlton Robert G. Willett 

Ivar Peterson Ralph F. Littlefield 



—10— 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Ray L. Harris Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1947 

School Committee 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1945 

*Robert C. Hall Term expires 1945 

Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Marion C. Reed Term expires 1946 

Edith T. Engman Term expires 1947 

Margaret Eraser Term expires 1947 

**H. Vaughn Allen 

♦Resigned **Elected to replace* 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

Mary Haskell Lothrop Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Wendell F. Davis Term expires 1947 

Board of Health 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1945 

O. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1946 

Robert R. Ford . Term expires 1947 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1945 

Grace O. Lears Term expires 1946 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1947 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1945 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1946 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1947 



—11— 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1945 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1946 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1947 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Ralph P. Marble Term expires 1945 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1947 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN — 1944 

Executive Clerk 

Virginia Milbery 

Office : Town Hall Hours : 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Meetings : Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7 :30 

Board of Public Welfare, Tuesday evenings at 7:00 

Finance Committee 

W. Stuart Allen Pauline Bursaw 

Alden C. Flagg Albert W. Locke 

William T. Merriam Porter G. Jenks 



Superintendent of Streets 

Russell C. Berry 

Registrars of Voters 

William B. Feely Term expires 1945 

James W. Coughlin Term expires 1946 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1947 

Harlan E. Tuttle Ex-Officio 



—12— 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — Alice C. Duren 
Clerk — James A. Wayne 
Inspector — Saipuel E. Knowlton 
Inspector — Paul A. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — Gertrude M. O'Neil 
Deputy Clerk — Helen R. Best 
Deputy Inspector — Ralph L. Rogers 
Deputy Inspector — Leo T. McCarthy 
Teller — Marion C. Jewell 
Teller— Mary F. McCarthy 

Precinct II 
Warden — Doris Soar 
Clerk — Grace J. Cullinane 
Inspector — Merle M. Hayward 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — Marion H. Wilmot 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas M. Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Henry L. Capelle 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph H. Lemoine 
Teller — Marion L. Piper 
Teller — John J. Bradley 

Precinct III 
Warden — Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Anna M. Learmonth 
Inspector — Louise C. O'Brien 
Inspector: — Mary M. Laffin 
Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk — Elizabeth M. White 
Deputy Inspector — Harry E. Holt 
Deputy Inspector — Katherine M. Kinsley 
Teller — Margaret F. Leveroni 
Teller — Marion C. Reed 



—13— 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Forest Warden 

H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 

Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Carl E. Anderson 

Town Forest Committee 

James J. Knight Term expires 1945 

Albert R. Jenks Term expires 1946 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1947 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Oliver D. Wood Charles E. Smith 

Field Drivers 

Norman E. Livermore Robert G. Willett 

Norman L. Perkins 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James J. Knight 

Police Officers 

*Michael Foley, Chief 
Robert G. Willett Benjamin H. Sawyer 

Louis Leveroni Samuel E. Knowlton 

* Civil Service — Permanent 



—14— 

Burial Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 

Frederick Kennedy- 
Workmen's Compensation Agent 
Howard L. Jones 

Public Weighers 

William Braman Albert S. Braman 

G. Howard Reed Philip Newell 

A. W. Davis Thomas Hearon 

John William Davis Albert R. Jenks 

Alfred Davis, Jr. Porter G. Jenks 

M. B. Ferber Edith King 

Willard Houghton L. W. Lowe 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



We submit, herewith, the reports of the various depart- 
ments of the Town for .the year ending December 31, 1944; 
also a report of the action taken on all articles submitted to 
the voters at the regular and special town meetings. 

The Board of Selectmen was organized on March 8, 
1944 with Arthur W. Lee, Chairman; Lawrence Donnelly, 
Clerk and George S. Braman. The Board has had fifty-two 
regular and three special meetings during the year. 

Russell C. Berry was appointed Superintendent of 
Streets on April 5, 1944. 



—15— 

New overhead doors were installed at the Acton Center 
fire house and both the Acton Center and South Acton fire 
houses were painted. 

During the year, the Town purchased the land and 
buildings owned by the Acton Agricultural Holding Com- 
pany. One of these buildings is being used for sand storage 
and another for housing the large pieces of road machinery. 
All town equipment is now stored on town property. The 
old building used by the highway department has been 
turned over to the tree department. 

The Board is asking that committees be appointed to 
submit zoning and building laws to the Town. It has been 
called to our attention that steps along these lines should 
be taken to safeguard the citizens and property of the Town. 

We are also asking that a committee be appointed to 
recommend the advisability of carrying insurance on some 
or all town property and equipment. This matter should be 
brought before the Town for their decision. 

The Board is asking that a committee be appointed to 
investigate the advisability of the Town purchasing a truck 
for the highway department. Practically all towns own one 
or more trucks and we feel that it would be a wise and eco- 
nomical move for this Town to do the same. 

The Board wishes, at this time, to express its apprecia- 
tion to all town officers and committees for their support 
and co-operation in carrying out the duties of their respec- 
tive offices during the past year. 

ARTHUR W. LEE, 
LAWRENCE DONNELLY, 
GEOREGE S. BRAMAN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



—16— 
TOWN MEETINGS 



Abstract of the Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 13, 1944 



Art. 1. To choose all necessary town officers and 
committees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose : Clara L. Sawyer trustee of the Elizabeth 
White Fund for three years. 

Chose : Grace O. Lears trustee of the Elizabeth 
White Fund for two years. To fill a vacancy. 

Chose : Arnold H. Perkins trustee of the West Acton 
Firemen^s Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose: Frederick T. Kennedy trustee of the Acton 
Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose: Charles E. Smith trustee of the Goodnow 
Fund for three years. 

Chose: Ralph P. Marble trustee of the Goodnow 
Fund for one year. To fill a vacancy. 

* Voted : That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
thousand dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Se- 
lectmen be three hundred dollars per annum and the other 
members two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salaries of the Assessors be fifteen 
hundred dollars in the aggregate per annum to be appor- 
tioned as they may determine. 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, the clerk fif- 
teen dollar^ and the other member ten dollars per annum. 



—17— 

Voted : That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per annum and that of the other members seventy-five dol- 
lars each per annum and that a member of the Board of 
Public Welfare shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assist- 
ance and that the expense of administering this assistance 
such as necessary supplies, salary and traveling expense 
of said supervisor shall not exceed more than one hundred 
dollars of the amount provided for this purpose by the Fed- 
eral Government. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen 
dollars for the annual meeting and ten dollars for the 
special meetings. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be two 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Voted : That the salary of the Town Treasurer be six 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Accountant be 
six hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the town highway labor shall be paid 
seventy-five cents per hour provided that it is agreeable to 
the State. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to fix the 
j?!alaries of all other town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the sev- 
eral reports of the town officers. 

Voted: To accept the several reports of town offi- 
cers. 

Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committee chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

Mr. Clare Milbery gave a report of the committee on 
numbering houses. 



—18— 

Voted: To accept the report of the committee on 
numbering the houses as a report of progress. 

Art. 4. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and de- 
termine how the same shall be raised. 

Under this and other articles in the warrant it was 
voted to appropriate and raise by taxation for: 

Highways, Village $ 1,200.00 

Highways, Chapter 81 7,125.00 

Highways, Chapter 90 2,000.00 

General Government 8,600.00 

Bonds (town officers) 280.00 

Buildings and Grounds 2,400.00 

Police Department 

Chiefs Salary 1,800.00 

Expenses and Operating Cruiser 1,000.00 

Chiefs War Bonus 300.00 

Fire Department • 3,000.00 

Forest Fires 1,200.00 

Hydrant Service 3,453.00 

Moth Department 1,200.00 

Tree Warden 650.00 

Health Department, including Nurses 3,800.00 

Snow Removal 4,000.00 

Street Lighting 3,400.00 

Public Welfare 4,500.00 

Veterans* Benefits 3,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 1,800.00 

Old Age Assistance 18,000.00 

Department of Education 59,000.00 

Library Maintenance 1,500.00 

Library, Books 200.00 

Cemeteries 2,800.00 

Liability Insurance 600.00 

Memorial Day 250.00 

Expense of Dog Officer 200.00 



—ID- 
Jones Community Field 100.00 

Unclassified 300.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 320.00 

Post War Public Works Committee 500.00 

Reserve Fund from Overlay Surplus Account 2,000.00 

Rationing 500.00 

Committee on Public Safety 500.00 

Transfer from Machinery Fund to Machinery 

Account 750.00 

Disposal of Garbage 1,800.00 

Interest on Highway Loans 22.50 

Bonded Indebtedness 3,000.00 

Power Metal-Working Machines, Art. 15 1,500.00 

Repairing Town Sprayer 150.00 

Public Welfare, Art. 14 100.00 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement Board, Art. 16 . . 277.88 

Fluorescent Lighting in Schools, Art. 17 ... . 1,500.00 

Repairing High School Roof, Art. 18 1,500.00 

Painting Fire House and Repairing Doors, 

Art. 21 375.00 

Pay the following unpaid bills for the differ- 
ent departments: 

Fire Department 208.30 

Forest Fires 130.10 

Snow Removal 28.75 

Board of Health 26.00 

Surplus Revenue Account on account of State 
and County allotments for highways 

See vote under Art. 24 11,125.00 



$163,971.53 



Art. 5. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for the observance of Memorial 
Day. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars for the observance of Memorial Day. 



—20— 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1944, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Voted unanimously: That the town treasurer, with 
the approval of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1944, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, 
Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The town will 
be reimbursed for the amount spent, by the County of Mid- 
dlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred (200) dollars for the use of the Treasurer, to pay the 
expenses of the local dog officer. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $100.00 for the maintenance of Jones 
Community Field, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate one hundred (100) 
dollars for the maintenance of Jones Community Field, 
South Acton. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
$750.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Ac- 
count, or act anything thereon. 



^21^ 

Voted: To transfer seven hundred fifty (750) dollars 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $500.00 or any other sum to be used 
by the Town Forest Committee for the purpose of purchas- 
ing additional forest land or act anything thereon. 

Motion : That the town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of five hundred (500) dollars for the use of the 
Town Forest Committee. 

Motion did not prevail-. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $500.00 for the work of the Post War 
Public Works Committee, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of five hun- 
dred (500) dollars for the use of the Post War Public Works 
Committee. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $150.00 for repairs to the town sprayer, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one hun- 
dred fifty (150) dollars for repairs to the town sprayer. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Public Welfare to employ a person from the Civil 
Service list for the administration of Old Age Assistance, 
Aid to Dependent Children and General Relief in Acton, or 
act anything thereon. 

Motion : That the town authorize the Board of Public 
Welfare to employ a person from the Civil Service list for 
the administration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent 
Children and General Relief in Acton. 

Voted : That the vote be taken by ballot. 

Four tellers were appointed by the Moderator: H. Ben- 



—22— 

jamin Smith, Wm. Henry Soar, Richard A. Lowden and 
Herbert L. Leusher. 

Motion did not prevail. 

Whole number of votes cast 199 Yes 55 

No 144 

Art. 14. To see if the town w^ill vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $200.00 to defray the necessary ex- 
penses of the person employed by the Board of Public Wel- 
fare in the administration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to De- 
pendent Children and General Relief, or act anything there- 
on. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one hun- 
dred (100) dollars to defray the necessary expenses of the 
person employed by the Board of Public Welfare in the ad- 
ministration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Chil- 
dren and General Relief. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1500.00 for power metal-working 
machines in the high school shop, as recommended in the 
report last year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of fifteen 
hundred ($1500) dollars for power metal-working machines 
to be used in the high school shop. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $277.88, as required by law, to be paid 
to the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board on ac- 
count of teachers on leave of absence for military service, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two hun- 
dred seventy-seven and 88/100 (277.88) dollars to be paid 
to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement Board. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1500.00 to install fluorescent lighting 
fixtures in all elementary classrooms, or act anything there- 
on. 



r-23— 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of fifteen 
hundred (1500) dollars to install fluorescent lighting 
fixtures in all elementary classrooms. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1500.00 for a new high school roof 
covering, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of fifteen 
hundred (1500) dollars for a new high school roof covering. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to have an annual audit of the various 
accounts of the town or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To instruct the Board of Selectmen to have an 
annual audit of the various accounts of the town. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1800.00 so that the Board of Health 
may renew the contract for the collection and disposal of 
garbage for the period of one year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of eighteen 
hundred (1800) dollars so that the Board of Health may 
renew the contract for the collection and disposal of gar- 
bage for the period of one year. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $375.00 for the installation of two 
overhead doors in the Acton Center Fire House and for the 
painting of the Acton Center and South Acton Fire Houses, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of three 
hundred seventy-five dollars for the installation of two 
overhead doors in the Acton Center Fire House and for the 
painting of the Acton Center and South Acton Fire Houses. 

Act. 22. To see if the town will vote to amend the 
By-Laws of the Town of Acton, adopted on March 8, 1926, 
by adding at the end of Article 1 of Section 1, the following: 



—24— 

The members of the Board of Selectmen, Board of Assessors, 
Board of Public Welfare, School Committee and the Board 
of Health, are to be equally represented from each of the 
three existing precincts, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass, over the article. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $2000.00 from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve 
Fund or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of two thousand 
(2000) dollars from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve Fund. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will appropriate from the 
Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the State's and 
County's allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 
90, provided that the reimbursement from the State and 
County be credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate from the Surplus Revenue 
Account the sum of eleven thousand one hundred twenty- 
five (11,125) dollars the amount of the State's and County's 
allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 90, pro- 
vided that the reimbursement from the State and County be 
credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate a sum of money to pay the following unpaid bills 
for 1943 or do or act anything thereon. 

Fire Department $208.30 

Forest Fires 130.10 

Snow Account 28.75 

Board of Health 26.00 



$393.15 

Voted: That the sum of $393.15 be appropriated to 
pay the unpaid bills under Article 25. 

Voted : To adjourn. 



—25— 

ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SPECIAL 
TOWN MEETING HELD SEPTEMBER 11, 1944 

Art. 1. To see if the town will vote to transfer from 
the Surplus Revenue Account an amount not exceeding 
$6000 for the purchase of land and buildings offered for 
sale by the Acton Agricultural Holding Company or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To transfer from the Surplus Revenue Ac- 
count an amount not exceeding six thousand (6000) dollars 
for the purchase of land and buildings offered for sale by 
the Acton Agricultural Holding Company. 

Yes 67 

This vote was taken by ballot: No 10 

Total 77 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to set aside a sub- 
stantial part of the property owned by the Acton Agricul- 
tural Holding Company as a public playground, this play- 
ground to be named the "Goward Field" or act anything 
thereon. 

Amendment: To substitute the name "Roberts 
Field" instead of "Goward Field," in memory of the 
three Roberts who were the first three casualties from the 
Town of Acton in this war. 

Did not prevaiL 

Voted : To set aside a substantial part of the property 
to be purchased from the Acton Agricultural Holding Com- 
pany as a public playground, this playground to be named 
the "Coward Field." 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
terms offered by the Acton Agricultural Holding Company, 
namely: on request of a Personal or Real Estate tax payer 
of the Town of Acton, subject to the approval and control 
of the Board of Selectmen, said playground to be used with- 



—26— 

out charge, for the purposes of Fairs, Old Home Days or 
other like gatherings beneficial to the Town of Acton and 
its citizens, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To accept the terms offered by the Acton 
Agricultural Holding Company namely: on request of a 
Personal or Real Estate tax payer of the Town of Acton, 
subject to the approval and control of the Board of Select- 
men, said playground to be used without charge for the 
purposes of Fairs, Old Home Days or other like gatherings 
beneficial to the Town of Acton, and its citizens. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
treasurer to accept sums of money received due to the pur- 
chase by the Town of Acton of land and buildings owned 
by the Acton Agricultural Holding Company and credit the 
same to the Surplus Revenue Account or act anything there- 
on. 

Voted: To authorize the treasurer to accept sums of 
money received due to the purchase by the Town of Acton 
of land and buildings owned by the Acton Agricultural 
Holding Company and credit the same to the Surplus Rev- 
enue Account. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $1000 from the Overlay Surplus Account for the 
alteration and relocation of Concord Road, beginning at the 
railroad tracks and extending in a northwesterly direction 
for approximately 1000 feet or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of one thousand (1000) 
dollars from the Overlay Surplus Account for the alteration 
and relocation of Concord Road, beginning at the railroad 
tracks and extending in a northwesterly direction for ap- 
proximately 1000 feet. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $2000 from the Surplus Revenue Account, which is 
the amount of the State and County allotments for the 



—27— 

alteration and relocation of Concord Road, beginning at the 
railroad tracks and extending in a northwesterly direction 
for approximately 1000 feet provided that the reimburse- 
ment from the State and County be credited back to the 
Surplus Revenue Account or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of two thousand (2000) 
dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account, which is the 
amount of the State and County allotments for the altera- 
tion and relocation of Concord Road, beginning at the rail- 
road tracks and extending in a northwesterly direction for 
approximately 1000 feet, provided that the reimbursement 
from the State and County be credited back to the Surplus 
Revenue Account. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $300 from the Surplus Revenue Account for the 
Board of Public Welfare for Temporary Aid or act anything 
thereon. 

V 

Voted: To transfer the sum of three hundred (300) 
dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account for the Board of 
Public Welfare for Temporary Aid. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $250 from the Surplus Revenue Account for the 
operating expenses of the Police Department or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of $250 from the Sur- 
plus Revenue Account for the operating expenses of the 
Police Department. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $450 from the Surplus Revenue Account for the 
operating expenses of the Rationing Board or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of four hundred fifty 
(450) dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account for the 
operating expenses of the Rationing Board. 



—28— 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $400 from the Surplus Revenue Account for the pur- 
chase and installation of new grates for the boiler at the 
Acton High School or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of four hundred (400) 
dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account for the purchase 
and installation of new grates for the boiler at the Acton 
High School. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $75 from the Surplus Revenue Account for the salary 
of a part-time man to fire the boiler at the Acton High 
School during the cold months or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of seventy-five (75) dol- 
lars from the Surplus Revenue Account for the salary of a 
part-time man to fire the boiler at the Acton High School 
during the cold months. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $300 from the Road Machinery Fund to the Road 
Machinery Account or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer the sum of three hundred (300) 
dollars from the Road Machinery Fund to the Road Ma- 
chinery Account. 

Voted to adjourn. 



—29— 
TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Births 

Whole number recorded 51 

Born in Acton 1 Native Parentage .... 45 

Males 20 Foreign parentage .... — 

Females 31 Mixed parentage 6 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 22 

Resident of Acton .... 29 Resident of other places 15 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 39 

Resident of Acton .... 30 Resident of other places 9 

Occurring in Acton ... 28 Occurring in other places 11 

Average age in years, 66 plus 



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—35— 
DEATHS REGISTERED IN 1944 



Date 


Name 


Y. 


M. 


D. 


Aug. 


4 


Aylward, Hannah 


44 


11 


28 


April 


16 


Barker, Harriet Crabtree 


73 


10 




May 


7 


Boyer, Charles W. 


55 


— 


— 


July 


15 


Branley, Norbert Francis 


36 


3 


15 


May 


24 


Chaplin, Donald Emerson 


16 


4 


24 


Oct. 


3 


Charter, William Wesley 


68 


6 


15 


Jan. 


28 


Conant, Charlotte 


68 


4 


— 


June 


8 


Conway, Sarah J. 


63 


4 


18 


Aug. 


27 


Crosby, Edwin Henry 


86 


— 


— 


May 


2 


Downey, John J. 


83 


10 


23 


Feb. 


10 


Durkee, Raymond F. 


56 


1 


8 


Sept. 


15 


Ellice, Clarissa L. 


73 





17 


July 


17 


Fiske, Elizabeth G. 


88 


9 


27 


April 


12 


Fullonton, Llewelyn T. 


68 


7 


— 


Feb. 


26 


Coding, James Alfred 


84 


10 


3 


May 


28 


Hall, Grace N. 


71 


4 


20 


May 


30 


Hampson, Ralph 


33 


3 


10 


July 


21 


Hausauer, Kenneth Nelson 


37 


— 


— 


Feb. 


14 


Haynes, Henry Lee 


78 


5 


1 


Sept. 


2 


Hennessey, Daniel J. 


79 


3 


15 


Jan. 


2 


Jones, Ralph Thomas 


61 


1 


1 


Sept. 


15 


King, Mary E. (Devane) 


57 


2 


16 


May 


19 


Kinsley, David Thomas 


78 




— 


Jan. 


9 


Knowlton, Ellen Hall 


93 


6 


22 


Jan. 


12 


Littlefield, Susan 


93 


2 


11 


April 


23 


Oikemus, John H. 


61 


— 


29 


Mar. 


21 


O'Rourke, Hugh F. 


62 


1 


13 


Dec. 


2 


Penney, Mabel L. 


59 


1 


19 


Mar. 


7 


Furrier, Raymond Eugene 


12 


4 


4 


June 


8 


Saeger, Wilford Cook 


63 


4 


14 


May 


8 


Seiders, Carl Fredrick 


66 




17 


Jan. 


2 


Sias, Harry 


79 


4 


10 


Aug. 


28 


Sisson, Stella Henrietta 


82 


9 


13 



r-86— 



Oct. 18 


Stockbridge, Irene V. 


71 


7 


25 


June 17 


Teele, Martha R. 


70 


11 


17 


May 14 


Tuttle, Hattie Lee (Miles) 


72 


3 


3 


April 29 


Tuttle, Jane M. 


85 


1 


9 


Nov. 1 


Wherren, Carrie Edna 


76 


8 


8 


Nov. 27 


Whitcomb, Frances S. 


69 


11 


22 


1943 










July 12 


DeCoster, Minnie Louise 


78 


10 


— 



-37— 



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—39— 
DOG LICENSES 



301 Licenses at $2.00 $602.00 

67 Licenses at $5.00 335.00 

1 License at $50.00 50.00 

1 License at $25.00 25.00 

$1,012.00 

Deduct fees 370 Licenses at 20 cents . . 74.00 



I 



Paid to the Town Treasurer $938.00 

Notice 

All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the own- 
ers or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of the time of year ownership is acquired. No tax 
bills are sent to owners of c(ogs. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



—40— 
JURY LIST REVISED — 1944 



Precinct I 



James W. Coughlin — 295 Main St. 
George E. Horton, Jr. — 437 Main St. 
Forrest E. Bean — 451 Main St. 
Arthur Freese — 40 Wetherbee St. 
Roy H. Linscott — 343 Great Rd. 
Elwin H. Hollowell — 13 Wheeler Lane 
Foster R. MacKinnon — 73 Esterbrook Rd. 
Herbert L. Leusher — 84 Woodlawn Lane 
John N. Stevens — 16 Newtown Rd. 

Precinct II 

Otis J. Reed — 7 Prospect St. 
Ralph F. Littlefield — 164 Main St. 
Edward LeClerc— 13 Piper Rd. 
David F. Penney — 81 Robbins St. 
Harold C. White— 38 Main St. 
H. Daniel Flanagan — 47 Main St. 
Chester A. Spinney — 103 Main St. 
Lossie E. Laird — 2 Fletcher Ct. 
Harold G. Nicola — 86 Concord St. 

Precinct III 

Ernest G. Banks — 637 Massachusetts Ave. 
A. Leslie Harris — 102 Willow St. 
Lester A. Sebastian — 457 Massachusetts Ave. 
Bertram D. Hall — 39 Windsor Ave. 
George A. Rifford — 186 Central St. 
Edward A. Schmitz — 57 Windsor Ave. 
Joseph F. Redfern — 220 Central St. 
Harry E. Fannon— 249 Central St. 
R. Almont Lawton — 235 Central St. 



—41— 
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION HELD NOVEMBER 7, 1944 



R. — Republican. 

D. — Democratic. 

S. L. P. — ^Socialist Labor Party. 

P. — Prohibition Party. 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet 3 TtL 

Whole number of ballots cast 452 491 492 1435 

President and Viee President 

Dewey and Bricker, R 378 332 350 1060 

Roosevelt and Truman, D 66 144 139 349 

Teichert and Albaugh, S. L. P 

Watson and Johnson, P 

Blanks 8 15 3 26 

Governor 

Horace T. Cahill, R 348 318 338 1004 

Maurice J. Tobin, D 96 162 149 407 

Henning A. Blomen, S. L. P 3 3 

Guy S. Williams, P 

Blanks 5 11 5 21 

Lieutenant Governor 

Robert F. Bradford, R 381 366 384 1131 

John B. Carr, D 58 104 98 260 

Alfred Erickson, P 1 1 2 

George Leo McGlyn, S. L. P 2 2 

Blanks 11 20 9 40 

Seeretary 

Frederick W. Cook, R 395 378 395 1168 

Margaret M. O'Riordan, D 48 93 81 222 

Horace L Hillis, S. L. P 1 1 

Blanks 8 20 16 44 



—42— 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Ttl. 
Treasurer 

Fred J. Burrell, R 358 334 352 1044 

John E. Hurley, D 75 133 123 331 

Herbert Crabtree, S. L. P 2 2 

Earle L. Smith, P. . . . 1 1 2 

Blanks \ 6 24 16 56 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley, D 94 127 116 337 

Frank A. Goodwin, R 343 333 355 1031 

Gote Elvel Palmquist, S. L. P 1 1 

Charles E. Vaughan, P 1 1 

Blanks 14 31 20 65 

Attorney General 

Clarence A. Barnes, R 368 347 381 1096 

Francis E. Kelley, D 68 115 96 279 

Fred E. Oelcher, S. L. P 2 2 

Howard B. Rand, P 

Blanks 14 29 15 58 

Senator in Congress 

(To fill vacancy) 

John H. Corcoran, D : . . . 42 83 59 184 

Leverett Saltonstall, R 396 388 419 1203 

Bernard G. Kelley, S. L. P 2 2 

E. Tallmadge Root, P 1 1 2 

Blanks 11 19 14 44 

Congressman 

Edith Nourse Rogers, R 399 399 429 1227 

Milton A. Wesson, D 39 68 51 158 

Blanks 14 24 12 50 

Couneillor 

Frank A. Brooks 407 384 443 1234 

Blanks 45 107 49 201 



—43— 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Ttl. 
Senator 

Merton H. Cochran, D 60 112 100 272 

Richard I. Furbush, R 371 343 367 1081 

Blanks 21 36 25 82 

Representative in General Court 

John H. Valentine, R 388 381 417 1186 

Blanks 64 110 75 249 

County Commissioners 

William G. Andrew, R 338 322 355 1015 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch, R 331 293 336 960 

Thomas B. Brennan, D 58 96 87 241 

Augustine F. Watson, D 54 72 64 190 

Blanks 123 199 142 464 

Sheriff 

Joseph M. McElroy, D. R 386 385 422 1193 

Blanks 66 106 70 242 

County Commissioner 

Melvin G. Rogers, R 395 380 424 1199 

Blanks 57 111 68 236 

iiiiJ 

QUESTION NO. 1 
PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Shall an amendment to the constitution to provide for 
a Fair, Concise Summary, instead of a Description, of Each 
Proposed Amendment to the Constitution and Each Law 
submitted to the People, under the Initiative and the Refer- 
endum, and Certain Changes relative to the Filing of Initia- 
tive Petitions which is further described as follows : — 

This amendment amends Article XL VIII of the Amend- 
ments to the Constitution by striking out section three under 



—44— 

the heading "The Initiative II. Initiative Petitions" and in- 
serting in place thereof a new section w^hich provides, — 

That an initiative petition for a constitutional amend- 
ment or a lav^ shall first be signed by ten qualified voters 
of the Commonwealth and shall be submitted to the Attor- 
ney General not later than the first Wednesday of the 
August before the assembling of the General Court into 
which it is to be introduced. It may be filed with the Sec- 
retary of the Commonwealth if the Attorney General shall 
certify that the measure and its title are in proper form and 
that it is not, affirmatively or negatively, substantially the 
same as any measure which has been qualified for submis- 
sion or submitted to the people at either of the two preced- 
ing biennial state elections, and that it contains only sub- 
jects not excluded from the popular initiative and which are 
related or which are mutually dependent. 

The Secretary shall provide blanks for the use of sub- 
sequent signers. He shall print at the top of each blank 
a fair, concise summary of the proposed measure, as de- 
termined by the Attorney General as it will appear upon 
the ballot, together with the names and residences of the 
first ten signers. All such petitions, with the first ten signa- 
tures attached, shall be filed with the Secretary not earlier 
than the first Wednesday of the September before the as- 
sembling of the Legislature into which they are to be in- 
troduced, and the remainder of the required signatures shall 
be filed not later than the first Wednesday of the following 
December. 

Section 3 of that part of said Article XL VIII under the 
heading 'The Referendum. III. Referendum Petitions," is 
also amended by striking out the second sentence of such 
section and inserting in place thereof provisions that the 
Secretary shall provide blanks for the use of signers of a 
referendum petition on a law requesting that the operation 
of such law be suspended subsequent to the first ten signers 
and shall print at the top of each blank a fair, concise sum- 



—45— 

mary vof the proposed law as determined by the Attorney 
General as it will appear upon the ballot, together with the 
names and residences of the first ten signers. 

Section 4 of that part of said Article XLVIII under the 
heading "The Referendum. III. Referendum Petitions," is 
also amended by striking out the third sentence of such sec- 
tion and inserting in place thereof provisions that the Sec- 
retary shall provide blanks for the use of signers subse- 
quent to the first ten signers of a referendum petition asking 
for the repeal of an emergency law or of a law which takes 
effect because the referendum petition does not contain a 
request for suspension, and shall print at the top of each 
blank a fair, concise summary of the proposed law as such 
summary will appear on the ballot together with the names 
and residences of the first ten signers. 

Article XLVIII is further amended by striking out sub- 
heading "III. Form of Ballot'' and subheading "IV Infor- 
mation for Voters" under the heading "General Provisions" 
and inserting in place thereof new subheadings III and IV, 
which provide, respectively: 

III. Form of Ballot 

A fair, concise summary of each proposed amendment 
to the Constitution and each law submitted to the people, 
as determined by the Attorney General shall be printed on 
the ballot. The Secretary shall give each question a number 
and cause such question, except as otherwise authorized in 
said article of amendment, to be printed on the ballot in the 
following form: 

In the case of an amendment to the constitution: Do 
you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the con- 
otitution summarized below, (here state, in distinctive type, 
whether approved or disapproved by the general court, and 
by what vote thereon) ? Yes. — No. 

(Set forth summary here) 



—46— 

In the case of a law : Do you approve of a law summa- 
rized below, (here state in distinctive type, whether ap- 
proved or disapproved by the general court, and by what 
vote thereon) ? Yes. — No. 

(Set forth summary here) 

IV. Information for Voters 

The Secretary shall print and send to each registered 
voter the full text of every measure to be submitted to the 
people, together with a copy of the legislative committee*s 
majority and minority reports, with the names of the ma- 
jority and minority members and a fair, concise summary 
of the measure as such summary will appear on the ballot 
and, in such manner as may be provided by law, other 
arguments for and against the measure, — 
which proposed amendment was approved by the General 
Court and in a joint session of the two branches held July 8, 
1941, received 201 votes in the affirmative and 2 in thai 
negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held 
May 12, 1943, received 214 votes in the affirmative and 5 in 
the negative, — be approved? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 224 212 245 681 

No 28 21 29 78 

Blanks '. 200 258 218 676 



QUESTION NO. 2 
PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Shall an amendment to the constitution to provide that 
the General Court may prescribe the terms and conditions 
under which pardons of offences which are felonies may be 
granted which is further described as follows : — 

This article of amendment to the Constitution of Mass- 
achusetts annuls Article VIII of section 1 of chapter II of 
Part the Second of the Constitution, which vested the Gov- 



—47— 

ernor, by and with the advice of the Council, with the full 
and unrestricted power of pardoning offences of which a 
person is convicted, except such as persons may be con- 
victed of before the Senate by an impeachment of the 
House, and adopts a new Article VIII in place thereof. 

This new Article VIII vests the pardoning power in the 
Governor, by and with the advice of the Council, but pro- 
vides further that if the offence to be pardoned is a felony 
the Legislature shall have power to prescribe the terms and 
conditions upon which a pardon may be granted. 

The new Article Villi contains the same provision as 
the old with relation to the ineffectiveness of pardons grant- 
ed before a conviction, — 

which proposed amendment was approved by the General 
Court and in a joint session of the two branches held July 8, 
1941, received 199 votes in the affirmative and 1 in the neg- 
ative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 
12, 1943, received 198 votes in the affirmative and in the 
negative, — be approved? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 153 150 173 476 

No 122 105 117 344 

Blanks 177 236 202 615 



QUESTION NO. 3 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Shall an amendment to the constitution restoring An- 
nual Sessions of the General Court and an Annual Budget 
which is further described as follows : — 

This amendment to the Constitution of Massachusetts 
annuls Article LXXII of the Amendments which provided 
for biennial sessions of the Legislature and a biennial bud- 
get, and makes effective those earlier provisions of the Con- 



—48— 

stitution and its Amendments which were annulled or 
affected by said Article LXXII, — 

which proposed amendment was approved by the General 
Court and in a joint session of the tw^o branches held July 
8, 1941, received 172 votes in the affirmative and 38 in the 
Txegative, and in a joint session of the two branches held 
May 12, 1943, received 188 votes in the affirmative and 52 
iTk the negative, — be approved? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 104 138 133 375 

No 178 134 167 479 

Blanks 170 219 192 581 



QUESTION NO. 4 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Shall an amendment to the constitution providing for 
Absent Voting by Qualified Voters who by Reason of Phys- 
ical Disability are unable to vote in Person which is further 
described as follows: — 

This amendment to the Constitution of Massachusetts 
annuls Article XLV of the Amendments to the Constitution 
v.hich related to absentee voting and adopts in its place a 
new Article XLV which authorizes the Legislature to pro- 
vide for voting, in the choice of any officer to be elected or 
upon any question submitted at an election, by qualified 
voters of the Commonwealth who at the time of such an 
election are absent from the city or town of which they are 
inhabitants or are unable by reason of physical disability to 
cast their votes in person, — 

which proposed amendment was approved by the General 
( ourt and in a joint session of the two branches held July 
3, 1841, received 171 votes in the affirmative and 30 in the 
negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held 
May 27, 1943, received 184 votes in the affirmative and 61 
in the negative, — be approved ? 



—49— 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 249 229 243 721 

No 33 39 46 118 

Blanks 170 223 203 596 

QUESTION NO. 5 

LAW SUBMITTED UPON REFERENDUM AFTER 
PASSAGE 

Shall a law described as follows: — This law amends 
chapter 271 of the General Laws by striking out section 
22A, as previously amended, and inserting in place thereof 
a new section 22A, which provides the conducting or pro- 
moting a game of whist or bridge in connection with which 
prizes are offered to be won by chance, or allowing such a 
^ame to be conducted or promoted, shall not authorize the 
prosecution, arrest or conviction of any person for such acts 
under chapter 271 of the General Laws, which deals with 
crimes against public policy, if the entire proceeds of the 
charges for admission to such game are donated solely to 
charitable, civic, educational, fraternal or religious pur- 
poses. This new section does not contain, as did the sec- 
tion now stricken out, provisions authorizing the licensing 
and conducting of the game of beano, — 

v/hich section was approved by both branches of the Gen- 
eral Court, by vote not recorded, — be approved? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 185 161 215 561 

No 75 96 71 242 

Blanks 192 234 206 632 

To obtain a full expression of opinion, voters should 
vote on all three of the following questions : — 

(a) If a voter desires to permit the sale in this city (or 
town) of any and all alcoholic beverages to be drunk on 
and off the premises where sold, he will vote "YES" on all 
three questions. 



—50— 

(b) If he desires to permit the sale herein of wines 
and malt beverages only to be drunk on and off the prem- 
ises where sold, he will vote "NO'* on question one, "YES" 
on question two and "NO" on question three. 

(c) If he desires to permit the sale herein of all alco- 
holic beverages but only in packages, so called, not to be 
drunk on the premises where sold, he will vote "NO" on 
questions one and two and "YES" on question three. 

(d) If he desires to permit the sale herein of wines 
and malt beverages to be drunk on and off the premises 
where sold and in addition other alcoholic beverages but 
only in packages, so called, not to be drunk on the premises 
where sold, he will vote "NO" on question one and "YES" 
on questions two and three. 

(e) If he desires to prohibit the sale herein of any and 
all alcoholic beverages whether to be drunk on or off the 
premises where sold, he with vote "NO" on all three ques- 
tions. 

1. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for 
the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, rum, 
gin, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic bever- 
ages) ? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 144 183 158 485 

No 238 211 251 700 

Blanks 70 97 83 250 

2. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for 
the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and 
beer, ale and all other malt beverages) ? 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 159 197 168 524 

No 217 184 227 628 

Blanks 76 110 97 283 

3. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for 
the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, so 
called, not to be drunk on the premises? 



—51— 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Yes 182 217 212 611 

No 202 173 199 574 

Blanks 68 101 81 250 



RECOUNT HELD TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1944 

Attorney-General 

Clarence A. Barnes 1092 

Frances E. Kelley 279 

Fred E. Oelcher 3 

Howard B. Rand 

Blanks 61 

Total 1435 

JAMES B. COUGHLIN, 
WILLIAM B. FEELEY, 
JAMES B. WILSON, 
HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 
Registrars of Voters of Acton. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1944. 

An appropriation of $650 was made for this work last 
year. This money was for emergency work, such as, remov- 
ing dead and broken limbs and removing dangerous trees. 

The hurricane this last year has left the trees in very 
bad condition. We have taken out a number of trees in the 
last two years and should have some new replacements. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $1000 



—52— 

be made for the care of the shade trees, such as, trimming 
and removing dangerous trees and a sum of $250 for the 
replacement of new trees throughout the town. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden. 



REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1944. 

An appropriation of $1200 was made for the moth 
work last year. 

The cost of spraying material was about $500, the 
labor and running expense of the sprayer and truck was 
$650. This money was used for spraying through the town 
once for pest control, and a second spray for pest con- 
tral and elm leaf beetle through part of the town. 

I therefore recommend that an appropriation of $1500 
be made for the suppression of gypsy moth and elm leaf 
beetle and for other work that should be done. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is the report of your Sealer of Weights 
and Measures for the year 1944. 

I examined 31*4 weighing and measuring devices of 



—53— 

which 311 were sealed and 2 not sealed and 1 condemned. 
Fees collected $63.32. 

The Bureau of Standards again loaned their standard 
equipment for measuring tanks. 

I found the merchants very co-operative and anxious to 
have their measuring devices accurate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. ANDERSON, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION 
SERVICE — 1944 



Due to a shortage of manpower in the County Exten- 
sion office a general report is given rather than a detailed 
report as has been done during previous years. 

The Extension Service during 1944 turned over all its 
facilities to the war effort in the production and conserva- 
tion of food and other factors necessary to help win the war. 
The County Trustees, Town Directors and local leaders 
gave freely of their time in spite of the fact that most of 
them were fully occupied with other duties. 

Under agriculture most of the time was spent in co- 
operation with Selective Service Boards in furnishing in- 
formation relative to registrants employed on farms. This 
probably was the most important job of the year as the 
food production program could not continue unless the key 
men on our farms were retained. 

Farm labor is probably the next important item, with 
the local director cooperating with the school system in 
helping to make available all the boys and girls within the 
town and any other available people to help meet the ex- 
treme labor shortage on farms. The County office was in- 
strumental in finding some outside available help and 



especially during the harvest season various types of help 
were obtained to harvest the crop. 

General assistance w^as given in all production prob- 
lems in order that the maximum amount of food could be 
produced. 

Homemakers were assisted, especially in the conserva- 
tion and preservation of food, a better understanding of 
wise use of ration points and food that had to be purchased 
along with greater use of home-grown foods. Good nutrition 
for the family was especially stressed in order that the 
health of the family could be maintained under war condi- 
tions. Clothing renovation and construction, refinishing and 
upholstering furniture were all projects emphasized to help 
the homemaker carry on more efficiently under war condi- 
tions. 

With Boys' and Girls' 4-H Club Work, it was difficult 
here to carry on due to lack of available local volunteer 
leaders. Much credit, however, should go to the leaders 
who gave all their available time to help our boys and 
girls carry on with their various projects. The club mem- 
bers of your town were part of the 1,700,000 in the United 
States who helped 4-H earn the recognition of having made 
the largest contribution in the war effort of any of the youth 
organizations of the nation. Food Production, Food Preser- 
vation and Homemaking were the clubs given the greatest 
emphasis during the year. 

HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Director. 



—55— 
REPORT OF WORKMEN^S COMPENSATION AGENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 
Gentlemen: 

During the year 1944 there were two accidents in the 
highway department, both injuries were of a minor nature 
and the insurance company took care of them promptly and 
satisfactorily. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Compensation Agent. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT — 1944 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the Library January 
1, 1944, 21,870. Increase by purchase, 252. Increase by 
gift, 115. Total increase, 367. Withdrawn from circulation, 
321. Total number of volumes in Library, January 1, 1945, 
21,916. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was opened, 102 
days. 

Number of volumes circulated, 7,419. 

Largest daily circulation, 159 ; December 2. 

Smallest daily circulation, 15 ; December 20. 

Daily average circulation, 73 plus. 

Received from Library fines and magazines sold and 
paid to Town Treasurer, $75.19. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : U. S. Government, 1 ; State of Massachusetts, 8 ; 
General Electric Co., 1 ; Seventh Day Adventists, 1 ; Auto 
Council, 1 ; The Rosicrucians, 1 ; Heinz Products Co., 1 ; 
Proctor & Gamble Co., 1 ; Kalamazoo Co., 1 ; a graduate 
of Yale University, 1 ; Mildred Pope Moore, 43 ; Mrs. Day, 
16; Mrs. Roy S. Whitcomb, 11; Mr. Roy S. Whitcomb, 2; 



■56— 



J. A. S. Kimball, 7; W. H. Slayton, 3; Anon, 4; William 
W. Smith, 2 ; Mrs. Howard Jones, 1 ; R. W. Robbins, 1 ; Paul 
Bellamy, 1 ; M. E. Davis, 1 ; E. H. Washburn, 1 ; Ralph W. 
Piper, 1; Alden Flagg, 1; Mrs. Burton Harvey, 1; M. G. 
Sayethe, 1 ; Theodore Lowden, 1. Total, 115. 

This year Miss Mary H. Lothrop has become the As- 
sistant Librarian. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 

1944 
Non-Fiction 

Adams, J. Q. — Parties in the United States 32A214p 
Adams, S. H. — Incredible Era, Life and Times 

of Warren Gamiebiel Harding 922H263a 

Ahern, E. — The v^ay v^e wash our clothes 64A285w 

Allman, N. F. — Shanghai lawyer 915.1A444s 

Angell, N. — Let the people know 17A583L 
Anon — Into the second century with Proctor 

and Gamble 33A100i 
Baker, A. L. — Seventh-day Adventists 28B167s 
Ballou, R. O. (Ed.)— The Viking portable Bible 22B193v 
Bancroft, G.— The flight of the Least Petrel 917.2B213f 
Beard, C. A. & M. R. — The Beard Basic His- 
tory of the United States 973B368b 
Beck, H. C. — Fare to Midlands — forgotten 

towns of Central New Jersey 917.3B393f 
Bowen, C. D. — Yankee from Olympus, Justice 

Holmes and his family 922H7521bo 

Brooks, V. W.— The opinions of Oliver Allston 81B8731o 
Brownell, W. L. — Horse and Buggy Philosopher 81B882h 

Brucker, P. F.— The future of Industrial Man 33B888f 

Burnett W. (Ed.)— This is my best 80B964t 

Burroughs, H. E. — Boys in men's shoes 36B972b 
Cairns, H., Tate A. and Van Doren M. — 

Invitation to learning 80C136i 

Carlson, J. R.— Under cover 940.4C278u 

Clapesattle, H. B.— The Doctors Mayo 921M473s 



—57— 



Coatsworth E. — Country neighborhood 81C652c 

Cobb, I. S.— Exit laughing (Auto Biog.) 922C6531c 

Coe, D. — Road to Alaska 35C672r 

Coe, G. A.— What ails our youth 37C672w 
Conger, E. M. — American tanks and tank 

destroyers 62C789a 
Copeland L. (Ed.) Popular quotations for all 

uses 80C782p 
Cot P. — Triumph of treason 940.4C843t 
Crane, C. E.— Winter in Vermont 917.3C891w 
Cross, W. L. — Connecticut Yankee, an auto- 
biography 922C951C 
Cunningham, E. W. — The kid next door 940.4C973k 
Davis, M. E. — Industrial life insurance in the 

U. S. 36D263i 
Dawson, M. M.— The ethics of Confucius 18D272e 
DeChambrun, R. — I saw France fall 940.4D293i 
Denham, A. F. — 20 years progress in com- 
mercial motor vehicles 62D393t 
Deutsch, B. — Walt Whitman, builder for 

America 922W615d 
Eaton, W. E. (Ed.)— Wakefield, Massachu- 
setts, a history, 1644-1944 974.5E14w 
Elliott, C. N. — Conservation of American 

resources 33E46c 
Elting, M. and Weaver R. — Battles, how they 

are won 908E51b 
Fairchild, D. — Garden islands of the Great 

East 910F165g 

Fenton, C. L. and M. K. — The land we live on 55F3421 
Ferris, H. (Ed.) — Loves, enchantment, story 

poems and ballads 82F3942 
Fifield, R. H. and Parecy, G. E. — Geopolitics 

in principle and practice .32F469g 

Fortesque W.— Trampled lilies 940.4F738t 

Fowler, G. — Good-night sweet prince 922B275f 

Gibran, K.— The prophet 89G463p 



—58— 



Giles N. — Punch in Susie, a woman's war 

factory diary 940.4G472p 

Oilman, W. — Our hidden front 940.4G487O 

Ginzberg, E. — Grass on the slag heaps, the 

story of the Welsh miners 914.2G492g 

Girdler, T. M. — Bootstraps — Life of Tom M. 

Girdler 922G524g 

Golenpaul, D. (Ed.) — Information, please. 

Game Book 
Gordin, A. — Communism unmasked 
Griffin, A. F. — Freedoms American style 
Grove's, E. R. — Personality and social adjustment 



79G625i 
33G661C 
32G851f 
17G884P 
924C5631g 
22H217b 
922S823h 



Guedalla, P. — Mr. Churchill 
Hamilton, E. N. — Bible names 
Hammond, J. W. — A magician of science 
Hay, T. R. and Werner, M. R. — The admir- 
able trumpeter 922W686h 
Hedin, S. — The wandering lake 915.8H454w 
Heindel, M. — The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception 36H468r 
Helion, J. — They shall not have me 940.4H475t 
Hindus, M. — Mother Russia 914.7H662m 
Hogner, D. C. — Summer roads to Gaspe 917.1H714s 
Holmes, F. L. — Abraham Lincoln traveled 

this way 917.3H749a 
Holmes, F. L. — George Washington traveled 

this way 917.3H749g 
Hubbard, W. L. (Ed.) — American history 

and encyclopedia of music, 11 vols. 78H876a 

Irwin, D. — Alone across the top of the world 919.8172a 

world 919.8172a 

Johnston, E. — America Unlimited 33J72a 

Johnson, O — Bride in the Solomons 919.3J681b 
Kimball, F. T. and Allen, A. W. — How to feel 

better and look it 61K49h 

Landon, M. — Anna and the King of Siam 919.1L259a 

Lasser, J. K. — Your corporation tax, 1944 33L347yo 

Lasser, J. K. — Your income tax, 1944 33L347y 



—59- 



Latane, J. H. and Wainhouse, D. W. — A his- 
tory of American foreign policy 973L351h 
Leigh, W. R. — Frontiers of enchantment, one 

artist's adventures in Africa 916.7L528f 
Leugyel, E.— Siberia 915.7L566s 
Liddell and Scotts — An intermediate Greek- 
English Lexicon, 7th Ed. 48L712i 
Lilienthal, D. E. — T. V. A. democracy on the 

march 62L728d 
Loucks, W. N. and Hoot, J. W. — Comparative 

economic systems 33L886c 
Loveridge, A. — Many happy days Tve 

squandered 59L896m 

MacArthur, D. — MacArthur on war 35M116m 

MacCormac, J. — America and world mastery 940.4M131a 

MacCreagh, G. — White waters and black 918M132w 

Martin, D. — I know Tunisia 916.1M379i 

Mead, J. M.— Tell the folks back home 940.4M479t 

Miller, C. — Cannibal caravan 919.1M647c 

Miller, F. T. — Eisenhower, man and soldier 922E36m 
Morehouse, W. — George M. Cohan, prince of 

the American theatre 922C678m 
Mottram, R. H. — Trader's dream (British 

East India Co.) 33M921t 

Needham, J. G. — Introducing insects 59N374i 

Opdyke, G. H. — Art and nature appreciation 70061a 
Osterweis, R. G. — Rebecca Gratz, a study in 

charm 922G773o 
Ottley, R. — New world a-comin'inside black 

America 32089n 

Peppard, H. M. — Sight without glasses 61P424s 

Perry, J. — Democracy begins at home 32P463d 

Pierce, A. — Quick freezing 64P615q 

Pinchon, E. — Zapata the unconquerable 972P647z 

Poore, H. R. — Arts place in education 70P823a 

Powers, J. R. — The Power's girls 70P888p 

Pyle, E. — Here is your war 940.4P996h 



—60— 



Reynolds, Q. — The curtain rises 

Riess, C. — The Nazis go underground 

River, W. L. — Malta story 

Robbins, R. W. — Thru the covered bridge 

Robinson, T. — In and out 

Rolo, C. J. — Wingate's raiders 

Russell, W. — Berlin embassy 

Rutherford, R. — Boys grown tall, a story of 

American initiative 
Santayana, G. — Persons and places 
Sav^^yer, C. W. — Our rifles 
Shackelford, S. — Electric eel calling 
Shiber, E. — Paris underground 
Smallzried, E. A. and Roberts, D. J. — More 

than you promise, a business at work in 

society 
Spencer, C. — Made in China 
Stettinius, E. R., Jr. — Lend-lease weapon for 

victory 
Sun Fo — China looks forward 
Swank, E. S. — The story of food preservation 
Taylor, H. J. — Time runs out 
Van Ess, J. — Meet the Arab 
Vaughan, J. — The music of wild flowers 
Waldeck, T. J. — Treks across the veldt 
Walker, S. — Dewey, an American of this 

century 
Wells, S. — The time for decision 
Willkie, W. — An American program 
Wonsetler, J. C. — Yanks in action 
Wood, L. N. — Raymond L. Ditmars, his excit- 
ing career with reptiles, animals and 

insects 
Woodbury, D. O. — Elihu Thomson, beloved 

scientist 
Woollcott, A. — Letters of Alexander Woollcott 
Ziff, W. B. — The coming battle of Germany 



940.4R464C 

940.4R559n 

940.4R621m 

81R635t 

81R665i 

940.4R744W 

940.4R968b 

921R975b 

922S231S 

62S3710 

918S524e 

940.4S555P 



33S635m 

70S845m 

940.4S8411 

951S957C 

64S972S 

910T242t 

915.3V249m 

82V367m 

59W1581t 

922D5191W 

940.4W456t 

32W737a 

35W872y 



922D615W 

922T469W 

922W9131W 

940.4Z68C 



-61— 



Fiction 

Adams, S. H. — Canal town A217ca 

Albrand, M. — Endure no longer A341e 

Alexander, E. — This is my son A3751t 

Allen, H.— Bedford village A426b 

Allis, M. — All in good time A438a 

Baldwin, F. — Change of heart B181ch 

Baldwin, F. — He married a doctor BlSlhf 
Barber, W. A. and Schabelitz, R. F. — Murder 

draws a line B234m 

Bates, H. E.— Fair stood the wind for France B3292f 

Baum, v.— Hotel Berlin, '43 B347h 

Bayer, O. W. — Paper chase B357p 

Bemelmans, L. — Now I lay me down to sleep B455n 

Berlin, E. — Land I have chosen B5151 

Billings, B. — Ruttlers three B598ru 

Bowen, R. S. — Dave Dawson at Casablanca B7861dm 

Boyle, K.— Avalanche B792a 

Brennan, F. H. — Memo to a firing squad B838m 

Brinig, M. — The gambler takes a wife B858g 

Brooks, A. T.— The girl next door B872g 

Buck, P. — China sky B9221c 

Buck, P.— His proud heart B9221hi 

Burroughs, E. R. — The beasts of Tarzan B972b 

Burroughs, E. R. — The return of Tarzan B972r 

Carneiro, C. J.— The bonfire C289b 

Carroll, G. H. — Dunnybrook C3191d 

Chase, V. — The American house C4874A 
Cobb, I. S. — A laugh a day keeps the doctor 

away C65351 

Cohen, O. R. — Romance in crimson C678r 

Cole, J. — The valley of revenge C689v 

Colin, G. C— Rio red C696ri 

Collier, T. — Fire in the sky C699f 

Collins, M. — The sister o' Cain C7121s 

Connington, J. J. — Jack-in-the-box C752j 

Coxe, G. A.— The lady is afraid C87911 



—62— 



Cozzens, J. G. — Men and brethren C882m 

Cronin, A. J. — The green years C9471g 

Cunningham, E. — Spiderweb trail C9732s 

Curry, T. — The Norman trail C976m 

Dane, C. — The arrogant history of White Ben D179a 

Davenport, M. — The valley of decision D247v 

De la Roche, M. — The building of Jalna D339b 

De Madariaga, S. — The heart of Jade D369h 

Doner, M. F. — O distant star! D68I0 

Dowdey, C. — Tide water D745t 

DuJardin, R. — Brief glory D876b 

Eberhart, M. G. — The dark garden E161d 

Eberhart, M. G.— Hasty wedding E161h 

Emerson, L. W. — Bronco blood E53b 

Ernenwein, L. — Boss of Panamint E71b 

Evans, A. R.— All in a twilight E922a 

Fast, H.— Freedom road F251f 

Fenisong, R. — Murder needs a name F333m 

Fenton, F. — A place in the sun F342p 

Ferrell, E. and M.— Full of thy riches F3681f 

Fitt, M.— Blues to Christobel F547c 
Foley, M. (Ed.) — Best American short stories 

for 1944 F663b 

Foster, E. — Dirigo Point F754d 

Fox, N. A.— The stanipede kid F793st 

Franken, R. — Claudia F829c 

Freeman, H. W. — His own place F855h 

Fuller, T. — Reunion with murder F968r 

Gabriel, G. W.— I got a country G118i 

Gaither, F. — The red cock crows G137r 
Gardner, E. S. — The case of the sleepwalker's 

niece G2261cb 
Gardner, E. S. — The case of the black-eyed 

blonde G2261cd 

Geer, N. N.— Way o' the West G298w 

Gibbons, R. — Bright is the morning G4411b 

Gibbons, S.— The bachelor G4412b 



—63- 



Giles, G. E.— Target for murder G467t 

Golding, L. — No news from Helen G619n 

Goudge, E. — Green Dolphin Street G688g 

Greig, M. — Heart appeal G824h 

Greig, M. — No retreat from love G824no 

Grey, Z. — Wilderness trek G842wk 

Hall, J. N.— Lost island H1771 

Hancock, L. A.— Pat Whitney, R. N. H234p 

Hancock, L. A. — Student nurse • H234s 

Harrison, C. W.— Puncher Pards H3181p 

Hathaway, K. B.— The little locksmith H3631 

Hersey, J. — A bell for Adano H572b 

Hilton, J. — Good-bye Mr. Chips H656g 

Hopson, W. — Sunset ranch H799s 

Houston, M. B. — Pilgrim in Manhattan H843p 

Jameson, S. — Cloudless May J31cl 

Jennings, J. — The shadow and the glory J54s 

Kelland, C. B. — Heart on her sleeve K293h 

Keyes, F. P. — Senator Marlowe's daughter K44s 

Kossak, Z. — Blessed are the meek ' K86b 

Langley, D. — Wait for Mrs. Willard L283w 

Larrimore, L. — Bugles in her heart L334b 

Lee, C. — Cornish tales L477c 

Lindberg, A. M. — The steep ascent L742s 

Linscott, E. L. — ^The silver link L759s 

Lofts, N.— The golden fleece L829g 

Lomax, B. — Horse thief creek L839h 

Lomax, B. — Rusty guns L839r 

Longstreet, S. — The land I live L8571 
McNeile, H. C. — Bulldog Drummond strikes back M1591b 

Mann, E. B.— The blue-eyed kid M281b 

Mann, E. B. — Stampede M281s 

Mann, F. — Joseph the provider M282j 

Mapother, E. R. — Dark Darragh M297d 

Marsh, N. — Vintage murder M366v 

Marshall, M. M. — Arms and the girl M369a 

Mason G. and Carroll R. — Mexican gallop M399m 



—64— 



Maugham, S. — The narrow corner 
Millar, M. — The devil loves me 
Millar M. — Wall of eyes 
Mitchell, G.— When I last died 
Moore, I. — It's time to say good-bye 
Neumann, R. — Mr. Tibbs passes through 
Nichols, M. — Portrait of love 
O'Brien, K. — The last of Summer 
Perkins, J. R. — The emperor's physician 
Popkin, Z. — No crime for a lady 
Queen, E. — The Chinese orange mystery 
Queen, E. — The tragedy of Z 
Raine, W. M. — Border Breed 
Reisner, M. — Shadows on the wall 
Rice, J. — The windmill circle 
Rider, B. — Circle C moves in 
Ripperger, H. — 112 Elm street 
Robertson, E. A. — The signpost 
Ronald, J. — The night is ending 
Seeley, M. — The crying sisters 
Seeley, M. — The listening house 
C }ton, A. — Dragon wyck 
Shaun, R. — Twenty-four hours' leave 
Siodmak, C. — Donovan's brain 
Smith, B. — A tree grows in Brooklyn 
Snow, C. H. — Horsethief Pass 
Spinelli, M. — From jungle roots 
Standish, R. — Bonin 
Standish, R. — The three Bamboos 
Stevenson, D. E. — The two Mrs. Abbotts 
Stuart, J. — Taps for Private Tussie 
Sweeney, S. L. — Harvest of the wind 
Tennant, K. — Time enough later 
Thirkell, A. — Growing up 
Walker, M. — Winter wheat 
Wallis, J. H. — A niece of Abraham Pein 
Wallis, R. S. — Too many bones 



M449n 

M645d 

M645w 

M6811W 

M8222i 

N492m 

N621p 

01321 

P449e 

P828n 

Q3c 

Q3z 

R155bp 

R375S 

R497w 

R5441C 

R5930 

R6491S 

R768n 

S452C 

S4521 

S495d 

S524t 

S618d 

S643t 

S674h 

S757f 

S784b 

S784t 

S8471t 

S931t 

S974h 

T285t 

T473g 

W182W 

W2141n 

W2142t 



—65- 



Wells, A. M. — A talent for murder W4531t 

Wentworth, P.— The clock strikes XII W479c 

Westland, L. — Prentiss of the Box 8 W529p 

Whipple, D. — They were sisters W5741t 

Wilde, P.— Tinsley's bones ' W671t 

Winslow, A. G.— The dwelling place W778d 

Woods, W.— The edge of darkness W898e 

Wren, P. C. — Two feet from Heaven W945t 

Juvenile 

Anon — Honk the moose JAlOOh 

Best, H. — Garram the hunter JB561g 

Clark, M. — The poppy seed cakes JC594p 

Clymer, E. — Here comes Pete JC649h 

Cormack, M. — Road to down under JC811r 

Cory, D.— White otter JC833w 

Crane, A. — Gloucester Joe JC891g 

Daugherty, J. — Abraham Lincoln J9D736d 

Davis, L. R. — Stand fast and reply JD262s 

Dean, G. M.— Riders of the Gabilans JD281r 

DeAngeli, M. — Yonie Wondermose JD283y 
DesChesnez, E. M. — Lady Green Satin and 

her maid Rosette JD4411 

Dickens, C. — The life of our Lord J9D5481 

Disney, W. — Pinocchio, Disney's version JD612p 
Ditmar's, R. L. — Twenty little pets from 

everywhere JD615t 

Dixon, F. W.— The clue of the broken blade JD621c 

Dixon, F. W. — The sinister sign post JD621si 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Columbia JD675c 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Costa Rica JD675co 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography. El Salvador JD675e 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Guiana JD675g 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Nicaragua JD675n 
Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, New 

Foundland JD675ne 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Paraguay JD675p 

Donaldson, L. — Pictured geography, Uruguay JD675u 



-66— 



Farmer, W. — Bicycle commandos JF234b 

Foster, E. — Gigi, merry-go-round horse JF7542g 

Garrett, E. — Angelo, the naughty one JG2391a 
Graham, S. and Lipscomb, G. D. — Dr. George 

Washington Carver scientists J9G741d 

Harper, W. — Uncle Sam's story book JH2951u 

Haning, A. — The living forest JH4871 

Hildreth, G. — I know a secret JH644i 

Hoke, H. — Shep and doctor JH721s 

Hull, K. and Whitlock, P. — The far-distant Oxus JH9131f 

Ilin, M. and Segal, E. — A ring and a riddle JI28r 

Knight, R. A. — Valiant comrades JK712v 

Kristoffersen, E. — A bee in her bonnet JK931b 

Lansing, M. F. — Great moments in exploration JL294g 

Lasher, M. H. — Loggins chance JL3441 

Lawson, R. — Rabbit Hill JL425r 

Leaf, M. — Fair play JL434f 

Lent, H. B. — Full steam ahead JL574f 

Lippincott, J. W. — Wilderness champion JL765w 
MacDonald, G. and Weisard, L. — Red light, 

green light JM1351r 

Meigs, C. — The w^illow v^^histle JM5121w 

Molloy, A. — Becky's secret JM726d 

Montgomery, R. — Big Brownie JM788b 

Moon, G.— Nadita JM818n 

Nolan, J. C. — Treason at the point JN788t 

Norton, A. — The sword is drawn JN882s 

Nura — All aboard we are off JN974a 

Olds, H. D. — Jill, movie-maker J0442J 

Payne, E. — Katy no-pocket ' JP346k 

Perkins, L. F. — Eskimo twins JP449e 

Perkins, L. F. — The Italian twins JP449i 

Philbrook, E. — Far from Marlborough street JP545f 

Poston, M. L. — A girl without a country JP857g 

Sasse, A. B. — Terry Carvel's theatre caravan JS252t 

Smith, E. B.— So long ago JS646s 

Sperry, A. — Storm canvas JS751st 



—67— 

Stark, S. — Chaucho, a boy and his pig in Peru JS795c 
Shapiro, I. — Yankee thunder, the legendary 

life of Davy Crockett J9C938s 

Urmston, M. — Plain clothes Patricia JU77p 

Ward, M. B.— Boat children of Canton JW261b 

Worth, K. — New worlds for Josie JW932n 

Wright, A. R. — Summer at Buckthorn JW947s 



REPORT OF THE POST-WAR PUBLIC WORKS 
COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen : 

We feel, as of our report to the town at the last town 
meeting, that we are prepared to present several projects 
for the emergency employment, if and when it should be 
necessary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, Chairman. 
FOREST E. BEAN, Sr. 
RICHARD F. DEANE, Secretary 



ASSESSORS' REPORT — 1944 



Tax assessed as follows: 

Buildings, exclusive of land $2,593,275.00 

Land . 631,330.00 

Personal 446,300.00 

$3,670,905.00 



—68— 

Valuation January 1, 1943 . . . 3,624,905.00 

Increase in valuation 46,000.00 

Rate of Taxation, $29.40 

Real Estate $ 94,803.52 

Personal Estate 13,121.40 

Polls ► 1,514.00 



-$ 109,438.92 



Amount of money raised: 

State Tax $ 7,986.00 

State Parks Tax 134.37 

State Audit of Municipal 

Accounts 710.69 

County Tax 5,108.21 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assess- 
ment 1,286.80 

Town Grant 88,903.95 

Overlay 5,308.90 



.$ 109,438.92 



Added Assessments 

Polls 20.00 

Excise — 1943 57.55 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise : 

Number of Vehicles Assessed, 1066 
Total Value of Motor Vehicles 

and Trailers $ 135,860.00 

Rate of Excise, $35.85 

Total Excise $ 4,655.25 

ALBERT P. DURKEE, 
CARL FLINT, 
JAMES W. BAKER, 

Board of Assessors. 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for 
the year 1944: 

Cows 287 

Bulls 16 

Young Cattle 59 

Goats 39 

Swine 64 

Barns Inspected 51 

Dog-bites 12 

Rabies 

I find cattle and stables in very good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Animals. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1944 



INVESTMENTS 
Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank \ $ 465.54 

U. S. War Bonds 3,000.00 

$ 3,465.54 

RECEIPTS 
Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank $ 6.98 

U. S. War Bonds 75.00 

$ 81.98 



—70— 

EXPENDITURES 
Harlan E. Tuttle, Treasurer of 
the Evangelical Church in 

Acton $ 61.98 

Town of Acton for care of 
Goodnow lot in Woodlawn 

Cemetery 20.00 

$ 81.98 

CHARLES E. SMITH, 
RALPH P. MARBLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



December 31, 1944. 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The Board of Health of Acton herewith submits the 
following report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1944. 

We are pleased to report that the general health of 
the town is good and that during the year there have been 
few complaints of nuisances or conditions considered detri- 
mental to public health. 

With the shortage of doctors everywhere, due to the 
war, we have been most fortunate to have living within our 
town several dependable registered nurses who have been 
of great help and, being on call night and day, have materi- 
ally assisted the doctors and the public nurse. 

Lillian F. Taylor, R. N., the public health and school 
nurse, experienced a very busy year and on occasion has 
required the assistance of Verne Farquhar, R. N., a most 
willing and co-operative worker, going out day or night 
on call as needed. Lydia Rhodes, R. N., and Hazel Roche, 



—71— 

R. N., also have assisted the board many times during the 
year and for all of these services we are greatly apprecia- 
tive. 

While the nurse is on call twenty-four hours a day, yet 
her regular hours are 9 A. M. to 5 P. M., six days a week, 
Monday through Saturday, and although she frequently 
makes calls outside of those hours she should not be called 
or expected to attend outside of those hours except in the 
case of an emergency. Furthermore, each call made by the 
nurse should be paid for at the rate of fifty cents each visit. 
A few of our townspeople either have been unaware of this 
or overlooked it. 

This year our appropriation was $3,800.00 which, to- 
gether with a balance of a special war emergency appro- 
priation carry over of $429.00 gave us $4,229.00. We have 
spent $4,137.92 of our appropriation. This was due to the ex- 
tra nursing service furnished the town, the demands for 
which we hope will not be as great this year. We have been 
most willing to provide this service, demanded by the towns- 
people, to which they are entitled, and we could see no way 
of cutting down this expense. 

We recommend, therefore, an appropriation of 
$4,000.00 for the use of this board for the year 1945. 

Report of contagious diseases Jan. 1, 1944 to Dec. 31, 
1944. 

Chicken Pox 10 

Whooping Cough 10 

Scarlet Fever 5 

German Measles 4 

Mumps 4 

Measles . 67 

Meningococus M^eningitis 1 

Gonorrhea 2 

Syphilis 1 

Dog Bites 12 



—72— 

Deaths: 

Burial Permits issued 33 

Residents of Acton 30 

Residents who died in other towns 11 

Non-resident burials 9 

Total number of deaths recorded 39 

Respectfully submitted, 

O. L. CLARK, M. D., Chairman. 
L. H. CRAM, Secretary. 
R. R. FORD. 



REPORT OF TOWN NURSE 



January 3, 1945. 
To the Board of Health, Acton, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1944. Nursing services as follows: 

Bedside Nursing 2134 

Child Welfare Calls 193 

Pre-natal 200 

Post-natal 125 

Home Confinements 2 

Night Calls 235 

Over 350 hours of night nursing was done in the past 
year — all emergency calls. 

Eight patients have been X-rayed at the Middlesex 
County Sanitarium. 

Six more were taken to the Emerson Hospital for X-rays 
and Blood Tests. 



—73— 

It has been a busy year but there has been excellent 
co-operation from the other nurses. The central telephone 
exchange has been most helpful in their co-operation in 
transferring calls to the nurse on duty and getting help in 
emergencies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F. TAYLOR, R. N. 



REPORT OF WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen : 

We respectfully submit the report of the Welfare 
Board for 1944. 

The appropriation for Welfare for 1944 was $4,800, 
out of which $4,365.99 was spent, leaving a balance of 
$434.01. During 1944, we aided four cases in Acton and 
ten cases out of town with Acton settlements. At the 
present time, we are aiding eleven welfare cases, only four 
of which are in Acton. For the out-of-town bills during the 
past year, we paid $2,849.89 while $1,516.10 was paid for 
the four cases. in Acton. In anticipation of bills which will 
be incurred during 1945, we find it necessary to ask for an 
appropriation of $4,000, which is a decrease of $800.00 
from last year. r 

For Aid to Dependent Children, we are asking an ap- 
propriation of $2,000. This is an increase over last year of 
$25.00. During 1944, we aided four families having a total 
of nine dependent children. Our present case load is two 
families with a total of four children. 

We are asking for $20,000 for Old Age Assistance for 
the coming year. This is an increase of $2,000 over last 
year's appropriation. On January 1, 1944, our case load 



—74— 

was 64 and on December 31, 1944, it was 65. Although the 
number of recipients remained practically the same as in 
1943, administration and social services to these individuals 
have been increased by legislation, thereby necessitating 
an increase in our demands for next year. During the entire 
year, 74 persons were aided under this category of assist- 
ance, 58 of these had Acton settlements, 10 with out-of-town 
settlements and 6 which were unsettled. 

Your Board, desiring to give you an analysis of the 
expenditures for 1944, submit the following: 

TEMPORARY AID 
Paid to State on Acton settled cases . . $ 915.00 
Paid to other places on Acton settled 

cases 1,934.89 

Paid to cases in Acton 1,516.10 

Total expended $4,365.99 

Estimated reimbursement from other 

towns 650.21 



Approximate net cost to Town of Acton $3,715.78 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Total expended $ 2,487.70 

Estimated Federal Grants $ 547.50 

Estimated State reimbursement $ 829.24 1,376.74 



Approximate net cost to Town 

of Acton $1,110.96 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Total expended $ 31,656.20 

Estimated Federal Grants $ 13,843.64 

Estimated State reimbursement 11,933.58 
Estimated reimbursement from 

other places 687.83 26,465.05 



—75— 

Approximate net cost to Town 

of Acton $5,191.15 

Appropriations recommended for 1945 : 

Old Age Assistance $20,000.00 

Temporary Aid 4,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN J. INESON, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
WALTER B. STEVENS, 

Board of Public Welfare. 



REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 



January 1, 1945. 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit the following report of arrests made 
in Acton during the year ending December 31, 1944. 

Drunkenness 10 

Operating under the Influence of liquor 6 

Assault and battery 4 

Breaking and entering and larceny 1 

Larceny 3 

Causing injury to Real Estate 1 

Indecent exposure 1 

Keeping unlicensed dogs 3 

Arson 1 

Conspiracy 2 

Lewd and lascivious 2 

Fish and game violations 2 

Selling mortgaged property 1 

Violation of Executive Order (Speeding) 20 

Operating an unregistered motor vehicle 1 



—76— 

Operating a motor vehicle with improper equipment . . 1 

Operating a motor vehicle without a license 4 

Operating so as to endanger 2 

Operating after revocation of license 1 

Failing to slow at intersection 1 

Violation of the law of the road 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1944. 

The total number of alarms responded to are as 
follows : 

Building 16 

Automobile 3 

Chimney 3 

False 1 

Emergency 2 

25 

I would like to recommend painting the West Acton 
fire house next year and also replacing a small rear door 
which is beyond repair. 

One new box was added this year, No. 32, and located 
near the Ark Manufacturing Company on Central street. 
I would like to have three more added to the system next 
year. 



—77— 

Our equipment is in reasonably good condition and 
should be all right for the coming year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



FOREST WARDEN'S REPORT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1944: 

Total number of brush fires responded to . . . 61 
I would like to recommend at this time, if it is possible, 
to include the forest fire appropriation with the fire depart- 
ment. This would save a lot of red tape and also I think 
that the danger of running over would be a great deal less. 
The equipment is in fairly good condition, considering 
a few additions and changes to be made this year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden. 



REPORT OF TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 
Gentlemen : 

The Acton Town Forest Committee herewith submits 
the following report for the year 1944. 

Without funds we have been unable to extend our 



—78— 

acreage which now totals 71 acres. The great shortage of 
labor makes it impractical for us to commence needed thin- 
ning. We feel also that such work should be delayed until 
there is a real unemployment problem or until there is an 
acute fuel shortage. 

The Town Forest area in Massachusetts is increasing 
rapidly. We recommend an appropriation of $500.00 
annually. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, Chairman 
JAMES J. KNIGHT 
CLARENCE FROST, Secretary. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS FOR 1944 



We herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1944. 

The account of the town treasurer shows that during 
the past year the cemetery department has received and 
paid into the treasury the sum of $1,603.31 itemized as 
follows : 

Annual care of lots $ 649.06 

Burials 513.00 

Lowering device 78.00 

Sales of lots 205.00 

Foundations 100.25 

Miscellaneous 58.00 

Total $1,603.31 

We ask that these receipts may be considered in mak- 
ing your appropriation for the current year. 

We recommend an appropriation for the care of the 
cemeteries the sum of $2,800.00 and also the special appro- 



—79— 

priation of $400.00 for the purchase of a small compressor 
for this department. 

There has been added to the perpetual care account 
the past year, in new accounts the sum of $2,425.00. 

An itemized account of the expenditures for the care 
of the cemeteries will be found in the report of the town 
accountant. 

We have prepared a schedule of the receipts and ex- 
penditures on account of each lot under perpetual care, in 
books kept for that purpose, which may be examined by 
persons interested. 

HARRY E. HOLT, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
RAY L. HARRIS, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



REPORT OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The trustees have signed orders to the treasurer for 
three hundred and seventy-five dollars ($375.00) for the 
year ending December 31, 1944. 

These orders have been given after investigating and 
finding each person to be needy and worthy of help from 
this trust fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CLARA L. SAWYER, 
GRACE O. LEARS, 

Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



1942 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 6,895.51 

Interest '. 435.40 



$ 7,330.91 

Paid Treasurer $ 7,264.17 

Abated 65.32 

Tax Titles 1.42 



$ 7,330.91 



1943 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $18,315.86 

Interest 307.65 

$18,623.51 

Paid Treasurer $12,993.22 

Tax Titles 1.42 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 5,628.87 

$18,623.51 

1944 TOWN TAX 

Committed $94,803.52 

Interest '. 37.88 

$94,841.40 

Paid Treasurer $78,259.22 

Abated 918.75 

Tax Titles 48.51 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 15,614.92 

$94,841.40 



—81— 

1942 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 461.15 

Interest 31.65 



$ 492.80 

Paid Treasurer $ 481.44 

Abated 11.36 

$ 492.80 

1943 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 1,050.96 

Interest 16.80 

$ 1,067.76 

Paid Treasurer $ 597.73 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 470.03 

$ 1,067.76 

1944 PERSONAL TAX 

Committed $13,121.40 

Interest 4.92 

$13,126.32 

Paid Treasurer $12,045.37 

Abated 47.04 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 1,033.91 

$13,126.32 

1942 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 54.00 

Interest 2.70 

Cost .6.30 

$ 63.00 



—82— 

Paid Treasurer $ 55.00 

Abated 8.00 



$ 63.00 

' 1943 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 184.00 

Interest 2.74 

Cost 14.70 

$ 201.44 

Paid Treasurer $* 129.44 

Abated 46.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 26.00 

$ 201.44 

1944 POLL TAX 

Committed $ 1,926.00 

Interest .04 

Cost 80.05 

$ 1,934.09 

Paid Treasurer $ 1,204.09 

Abated 586.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 144.00 

$ 1,934.09 

1942 EXCISE TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 $ 417.71 

Interest 25.67 

$ 443.38 

Paid Treasurer $ 342.06 

Abated 101.32 

$ 443.38 



-83— 



1943 EXCISE TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 

Committed Jan. 6, 1944 

Interest 


. $ 


879.73 
57.55 
27.95 






Paid Treasurer 

Abated 


$ 

. $ 


965.23 

790.35 
57.33 


Uncollected Jan. 1, 1944 


117.55 



$ 965.23 

1944 EXCISE TAX 

Committed $ 4,655.25 

Interest 1.39 



$ 4,656.64 



Paid Treasurer $ 4,082.87 

Abated 11.58 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 562.19 



$ 4,656.64 



SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
JANUARY 1, 1945 

Total Debits 

1942 Town Tax $ 7,330.91 

1943 Town Tax 18,623.51 

1944 Town Tax 94,841.40 

1942 Personal Tax 492.80 

1943 Personal Tax 1,067.76 

1944 Personal Tax 13,126.32 

1942 Poll Tax 63.00 

1943 Poll Tax 201.44 



—84— 

1944 Poll Tax 1,934.09 

1942 Excise Tax 443.38 

1943 Excise Tax 965.23 

1944 Excise Tax 4,656.64 



$143,746.48 

Total Credits 

Cash Paid Treasurer $118,244.96 

Abated 1,852.70 

Tax Titles 5.1.35 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 23,597.47 



$143,746.48 



CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes. 



REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1944. 
Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law. . 42 
Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance 

with law 5 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 73 

Warnings to delinquent owners to get licenses 140 

Summoned to court 1 

Appropriation $200.00 

42 dogs at $3.00 for six days 126.00 

42 dogs disposed of 42.00 

Total $168.00 



—85— 

Gentlemen : 

I recommend the appropriation for the year 1945 be 
$250.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dog Officer. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1943 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1944. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1944 $ 83,575.71 

Receipts for 1944 : 

Received from State Treasurer : 

Public Safety $ 845.79 

Old Age Assistance, Federal . 14,289.28 

Highways 6,164.87 

Aid Dependent Children, Fed. 596.01 

Tuition 1,386.39 

Transportation 110.00 

Old Age Assistance 11,799.82 

Highway Fund, Chapter 569 . 6,906.60 

Income Tax 15,842.00 

Corporation Tax 16,876.60 

Meal Tax 780.05 

Reimbursement Loss of Taxes. 580.77 

Aid Dependent Children . . . 872.88 

Vocational Education 39.06 

Highways, Chapter 90 1,999.54 

State Aid 327.50 

$ 79,417.16 



—86— 



Received from Country Treasurer: 

Dog Account, Refund $ 698.17 

Highways 1,999.54 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee, 
Collector of Taxes: 

Poll, 1942 $ 46.00 

Personal, 1942 473.86 

Excise, 1942 292.32 

Tov^^n, 1942 6,828.77 

Poll, 1943 112.00 

Personal, 1943 580.93 

Excise, 1943 762.40 

Tov^n, 1943 12,685.57 

Poll, 1944 996.00 

Personal, 1944 12,040.45 

Excise, 1944 4,281.48 

Tovi^n, 1944 78,221.34 

Interest 896.54 

Costs 27.30 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 
Harlan E. Tuttle, Dog Licenses 
Horace F. Tuttle, Lots sold 

Woodlawn 

Wm. J. Gallagher, Sale Junk 
Town of Watertown, Old Age 

Assistance 

Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines 
Concord District Court, Fines 
Elwin, Hollowell, Care of Lots 

Selectmen, Licenses 

Fred Kennedy, Care Lots . . . 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 

Fred Kennedy, Lowering 

Device 

Fred Kennedy, Miscellaneous . 



$ 934.40 

155.00 
10.00 

220.33 
75.19 
317.55 
261.06 
26.00 
388.00 
513.00 

78.00 
58.00 



$ 2,697.71 



$118,244.96 



—87— 

Fred Kennedy, Sale of Lots, 

Mt. Hope 50.00 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations . . 100.25 

Board of Health, Licenses . . . 41.00 
City of Cambridge, Old Age 

Assistance 10.00 

Town of Acton, Mach. Acct. . . 796.25 
Martha Greenwood, Burial 

Expense 100.00 

Board of Health, Nurse Services 238.00 

W. L. Marshall, Jr., Forest Fire 17.77 

Town of Boxboro, Welfare . . . 59.85 
Boston and Maine R. R., Forest 

Fires 18.60 

Harry Holt, Grange Rent .... 49.50 

Harry Holt, Rent of Hall 491.00 

Mathew Freeman, Machin- 
ery Account 3.00 

School Dept. Telephone Book 

Fines 23.39 

Town of Westford, Schools . . . 334.31 

Town of Concord, Welfare . . . 540.75 

Town of Boxboro, Schools 3,127.92 

Town of Littleton, Old Age 

Assistance 49.41 

Town of Wrentham, Old Age 

Assistance 156.31 

Town of Marblehead, Old Age 

Assistance 63.43 

Carl E. Anderson, Sealer 

Weights 63.32 

City of Lynn, Old Age Assist. . 8.30 
Michael Enneguess, Land Low 

Value 25.00 

City of Boston, Schools 150.89 

Town of Swansea, Old Age 

Assistance 23.33 



88 




City of Lowell, Old Age Assist. 


27.41 


Chief of Police, Revolver 




Permits 


5.00 


Chief of Police, Bicycle Regis. 


13.25 


City of Boston, Welfare 


107.83 


Town of Concord, Land Tax . . 


25.12 


Selectmen, Maps 


1.00 


Old Colony R. R. Tax Title . . . 


62.49 


Old Colony R. R. Interest 


11.04 


Horace F. Tuttle, Library 




Books 


1.40 


William Hellowell, Advertise- 




ment 


1.28 


Dewey Boatman, Advertise- 




ment 


1.28 


James E. Kinsley, Advertise- 




ment 


1.28 


Lester Sebastian, Advertise- 




ment 


1.28 


James E. Barsi, Advertisement 


1.28 


Theron A. Lowden, Prem- 




Ref und 


104.92 


Town of Ashland, Old Age 




Assistance 


134.37 


Carrie M. Durkee, Liens 


41.00 


Acton High School, Ind. Arts 




Shop 


22.87 


Transfer from Blanchard Fd. . 


25.00 


Transfer from Cemetery Fd. . . 


1,509.22 


Transfer from Susan Noyes 




Hosmer Fund 


2,417.98 


Transfer from Memorial Li- 




brary Fund 


200.00 



$ 14,294.41 

Total Cash Receipts $214,654.24 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1944 83,575.71 



Sum Total for 1944 $298,229.95 



—89— 

Payments in 1944: 

Selectmen's Orders $199,809.58 

State Taxes 4,838.06 

$204,647.64 

Cash Balance Dec. 31, 1944 ... $93,582.31 

OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 

High School Bond, due 1945 $ 1,000.00 

High School Addition Notes, 164 to 176, due 

1945 to 1957 13,000.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, notes 181 

and 182 due 1945-1946 . 2,000.00 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 
Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 82,238.95 

Unexpended Balance 1,968.85 

$ 84,207.80 

Received Interest for 1944 . . . 1,655.30 



$ 85,863.10 
Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Bank . . $ 83,445.12 

Transfer to Town Account . . . 2,417.98 



$ 85,863.10 



CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 46,312.21 

Unexpended Balance 2,045.70 

$ 48,357.91 

Received for Perpetual Care 

for 1944 2,425.00 

Received Interest for 1944 ... 886.00 



$ 51,668.91 



—90— 

Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 50,159.69 

Transfer to Town Account . . . 1,509.22 



$ 51,668.91 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 2,228.22 



$ 27,228.22 

Received Interest for 1944 . . . 562.53 



$ 27,790.75 



Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks . $ 27,415.75 

Paid Trustees Orders for 1944 375.00 



$ 27,790.75 



WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 14,262.47 

Unexpended Balance 527.56 

$ 14,790.03 

Received Bequest to Fund ... 1,500.00 

Received Interest for 1944 ... 286.76 



$ 16,576.79 



Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Savings Bank $ 16,376.79 

Transfer to Tov^n Account . . . 200.00 



$ 16,576.79 



—91— 

GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 14,073.70 

Unexpended Balance 210.62 

$ 14,284.32 

Received Interest for 1944 293.58 



$ 14,577.90 



Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks. $ 14,452.90 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1944 125.00 



$ 14,577.90 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944 : 

Balance $ 1,506.14 

Received Interest for 1944 . . . 22.86 



$ 1,529.00 



Balance December 31, 1944: 
Bank Balances in Sav. Banks $ 1,504.00 

Transfer to Town Account . . . 25.00 



$ 1,529.00 

CEMETERY SURPLUS 

Balance January 1, 1944: 

Balance $ 1,065.07 

Received Interest for 1944 . . . 18.71 



$ 1,083.78 



Balance December 31, 1944: 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 1,083.78 



^92— 

WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944 : 

Balance $ 647.49 

Received Interest for 1944 . . . 13.00 

$ 660.49 

Balance December 31, 1944: 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 660.49 



ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1944: 

Principal Fund $ 2,565.00 

Unexpended Balance 208.09 

$ 2,773.09 

Received Donation to Fund . . 50.00 

Company Salaries 230.00 

Received Interest for 1944 . . 56.66 



$ 3,109.75 

Balance December 31, 1944: 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 3,109.75 

ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 

Principal Fund $ 1,500.00 

Received Interest for 1944 ... 9.38 



$ 1,509.38 

Balance December 31, 1944: 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 1,509.38 

Respectfully submitted 

WM. HENRY SOAR, 

Town Treasurer. 



—OS- 
REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Your Committtees on Finance respectfully submits the 
following recommendations for the ensuing year: 

Particular attention is called to the report of the 
Finance Committee for 1945. 

While the Finance Committee has carefully considered 
the amounts and other articles asked for by the several 
departments and in each case has made its recommenda- 
tion thereon, they have particularly given attention to the 
manner in which this report is presented. 

The reasons for the changes and itemization is in 
accordance with a plan followed by the many towns and 
recommended by the Association of Town Finance Com- 
mittees. Its aim and value being the authentic comparison 
with other towns according to valuation, population and per 
capita tax. 

In the last year an unfortunate circumstance occurred, 
due to misunderstanding, in the installation of fluorescent 
lighting. 

Due to dissatisfaction of the product furnished the 
School Committee incurred an overdraft to install fluores- 
cent lighting in four elementary school rooms instead of 
completing the installation of fluorescent lighting in all the 
elementary school rooms. This fact has made it neces- 
sary for the Selectmen to take certain actions in order to 
keep within the law. 

The Finance Committee recommends their action and 
a "yes" vote on all articles pertaining thereto, that the 
matter may be satisfactorily straightened, out and further 
recommend the $1,550.00 to finish the job as recommended 
by the School Committee and originally voted by the Town. 

We do, however, call attention of all departments to 
the difficulties that have arisen, that future votes may be 
carefully read and the amount voted, not exceeded. 



—94— 

The Finance Committee would call attention to the 
budget as set forth under Education. 

While the Finance Committee is in accord and recom- 
mend all that the School Committee asks, they feel that it 
is a mistake to include in the Educational budget such items 
as fluorescent lighting in the elementary schools and 
waterproofing north wall in high school, because such 
special items make too great a difference in the comparison 
of year by year. 

The Finance Committee believe that such items as 
would materially make the general expenses of education 
fluctuate should be put under special articles in the town 
warrant as is the custom of every other department of the 
town and other towns. 

Therefore be it moved and 

Voted: That the following sums of money be raised 
and appropriated for several specific purposes hereinafter 
designated and that the same be expended only for the pur- 
poses under the direction of the respective boards, commit- 
tees, or officers of the town, as follows : 



—95— 



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—103— 

Articles 9: 

Recommend $200.00 for Post War Public Works Com- 
mittee. 

Article 10: 

Recommend $550.00 for repairing the town roller. 

Article 11: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $1,000.00 for 
' repairs Highway Department buildings. 

Article 13: 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000.00 to purchase new hose and three 
(3) fire alarm boxes and installed or act anything 
thereon. Recommend $1,000.00. 

Articles 15: 

Recommend $77.80 to pay balance due on fluorescent 
lighting. 

Article 16: 

Recommended the appropriation of $1,550.00 to com- 
plete fluorescent lighting in the elementary schools. 

Article 20: 

Recommend the appropriation of $250.00 to replace- 
ment of shade trees. 

Article 21: 

Recommend the sum of $600.00 be appropriated to 
purchase of a power tractor. 

Article 22: 

Recommend appropriation for $400.00 for a compres- 
sor for the Cemetery Department. 

Article 30: 

Recommend $500.00. 

Article 32: 

Recommend the sum of $3,000.00 be appropriated from 
the Overlay Surplus account for the Reserve Fund. 



—104— 

The sum of $1,809.87 was transferred in 1944 from the 
Reserve Fund to the following accounts : 

Tree Warden $750.73 

Building and Grounds 446.71 

Aid to Dependent Children . . 175.00 

Fire Department : 325.00 

General Government 112.43 

$1,809.87 

Precinct 1 — Alden C. Flagg, W. Stuart Allen. 

Precinct 2 — Mrs. Pauline Bursaw, William T. Merriam. 

Precinct 3 — Albert W. Locke, Porter Jenks. 

Finance Committee. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton: 



I submit my report, concerning the work of the High- 
way Department, since my appointment April 17, 1944. 

The regular maintainance work of cleaning, cutting 
brush and patching was carried on. 

Eight miles of road received surface treatment. In 
addition, one and one-half miles of Main Street, was sur- 
faced with a mixed in place treatment. This consists of 
mixing trap rock pea stone with asphalt, forming a durable 
surface for heavy traffic. 

Three unfinished projects were completed: 

Esterbrook Road — widened, gravelled and surface 
treated. 

Prospect Street — ^seal coat. 

Arlington Street — construction of a catch basin and 
the laying of seventy-five feet of pipe connecting three 
catch basins. It is hoped that the drainage system laid out 
some time ago will be completed in the near future. 



—105— 

Nashoba Road, at narrow end near Newtown Road, 
was widened, gravelled and surface treated. 

During the summer a granite capstone broke at Cole's 
Brook, Hosmer Street. This was replaced with concrete 
and wheel guard. Due to narrowness of this road and di- 
rection in which the brook was following the edge of it for 
one hundred twenty-five feet, leaving stone wall holding 
road at this point in dangerous condition, an easement was 
obtained from the abutters and the course of the brook was 
changed. 

Gravel was put on the sides of Concord Road at Ice 
Pond, in order to retain the stone wall which was falling 
out and in a dangerous situation. This project will be com- 
pleted in the spring. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUSSELL C. BERRY, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF WAR PRICE AND RATIONING BOARD 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

As your War Price and Rationing Board enters upon 
the fourth year of its duties on January 2, 1945, a brief 
report of its activities for the year 1944 is in order. 

As a whole, the work has been largely stabilized, and 
of a routine nature; typewriters, bicycles and some types 
of stoves were taken from the rationed list of commodi- 
ties, but much more emphasis was, and, we are told, will 
increasingly be placed upon Price Control in an earnest 
effort to stop inflation, disastrous as it would be to all of us. 
Burdened, as the office always is, by the volume of reports 
required, in addition to our regular detail work, it became 
necessary for us to employ as additional aid. Miss Marjory 



—106— 

J. McAdoo, whose duties are almost entirely those of price 
checking and Price Control. She has well supplemented 
our efficient and courteous staff of Miss Sonya Farley and 
Mrs. Beatrice Parsons. 

Probably the most vexatious problem we have had to 
face the past year has been the shortage of tire quotas 
with which to fill your needs. For many months we have 
been some weeks behind in our efforts to keep your tire 
requirements satisfied, and we want to thank you sin- 
cerely for your patience in dealing with us in a problem 
out of our control. Mr. Allen G. Moody and Mr. Ralph 
W. Piper of the Tire Panel, have done a fine job and 
deserve a great deal of credit for their earnest and success- 
ful endeavors to solve the difficult problems involved. 

Once again Mr. Howard Billings and Miss Clara L. 
Sawyer have given freely of their time and their intelli- 
gent ability in solving those problems of Fuel Oils and 
Food respectively, which were presented to them. Our 
volunteer workers, Mrs. Florence Fannon and Mrs. Con- 
stance Smith, have been extremely helpful, and v/e ap- 
preciate greatly the use of their needed and conscientious 
ability. 

It is the sincere hope of the Board and its staff that 
the year 1945 will see at least some lightening of the 
rationing restrictions as a consequence of the hoped-for 
end of the grim European War. As always, we want you 
to know that the Board and its staff are ready and will- 
ing to assist you in any problems of rationing over which 
it has jurisdiction, and which perplex you. Please do not 
hesitate to bring them to us, and we will do our utmost to 
help you in every way possible. We have sincerely appre- 
ciated your patriotic co-operation with us over the past 
three trying war years, and thank you deeply for it. 
Respectfully submitted for the Board, 

WEBSTER S. BLANCHARD, 

Chairman. 



—107— 
REPORT OF TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton: 

I herewith submit my annual report covering the 
financial transactions of the Town for the year ended De- 
cember 31, 1944. 

Included is a detailed statement of the expenditures 
of each department, a tabulated record showing the ap- 
propriations, transfers, and balances as of December 31, 
1944. 

The last payment for the high school loan of $1,000.00 
will be paid this year together with payments of $1,000.00 
each on the high school addition notes and fire equipment 
notes. These payments will bring the total bonded debt 
of the Town to $13,000 at the end of 1945. 

You will note by the balance sheet the excellent 
financial condition of the town as the year closed with 
surplus revenue of $94,297.95. 

The amount due from the state and county for high- 
ways under Chapters 81 and 90 amounting to $3,499.30 
will be credited to the Surplus Account as soon as payment 
is received. 

I have audited the books of the Collector of Taxes 
and verified the cash on hand. I have audited the books 
of the Treasurer and verified the several trust funds in 
his custody. I ?iave verified the funds in the custody of 
trustees. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 











— 


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—112— 

Cash Receipts and Departmental Payments 

TREASURER'S RECEIPTS 

Treasurer's Itemized Report.. $214,654.24 
Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1944 . . . 83,575.71 

$298,229.95 

PAYMENTS 

General Government 

Selectmen 

Salaries and Wages 

Selectmen .... $ 691.67 
Clerks 1,190.10 

Postage 29.50 

Stationery, printing . . .27.33 

Town Reports . . 343.00 

Middlesex County 
Selectmen Assoc, 
dues 9.00 

Assn. of Town Fi- 
nance Com. dues 10.00 

Advertising 6.38 

Repairing Type- 
writer 8.00 

Sundry Expense . . 1.10 

$ 2,316.08 

Collector of Taxes : 

Salary $ 1,000.00 

Postage 96.12 

Books and Sta- 
tionery 18.28 

Printing 48.66 

Tax Title Expense 7.79 

$ 1,170.85 



-113— 



Treasurer : 








Salary .... 


$ 


650.00 




Postage . . . 




121.04 




Telephone 




12.35 




Printing . . 




16.51 




Books, stationery 


30.40 




Safety Deposit 






box .... 




6.00 




Sundry expense . . 


10.01 










$ 846.31 


Assessors : 






Salaries . . . 


$ 


1,458.33 




Ass'n. of Mass. As- 






sessors, dues . . 


6.00 




Notices of 


trans- 






f ers .... 




11.40 




Attending 


meet- 






ings .... 





20.00 




Stationery, 


print- 






ing 




9.58 


$ 1,505.31 


Accountant : 








Salary .... 


$ 


650.00 




Books, stationery 


32.42 




. Postage . . . 





5.70 




Telephone . 




1.80 


$ 689.42 


Town Clerk: 








Salary .... 


$ 


200.00 




Postage . . 




20.00 




Telephone . 




18.00 




Attending 


Ass'n. 






meetings 


and 






dues . . . 




20.00 





—114— 

Recording vital sta- 
tistics 80.25 

Stationery, print- 
ing 13.82 



Elctions and Regis- 




trations : 




Salaries : 




Registrars .... $ 


350.00 


Election officers 


324.00 


Recount 


35.00 


Moderator .... 


25.00 


Printing, station- 




ery 


204.12 


Posting warrants. 


20.00 


Lunches for elec- 




tion officers . . 


46.32 


Rent 


44.00 


Street booklets . 


70.17 


Sundry expense . 


9.19 



Sealer of Weights 
and Measures: 

Salary, transpor- 
tation $ 200.00 

Books, seals, ad- 
vertising 15.55 



$ 352.07 



$ 1,127.80 



$ 215.55 



Cattle Inspector: 

Salary $ 125.00 

Soldiers' Relief Agent: 

Salary 50.00 



—115— 



Board of Health : 




Salaries 


50.00 


Postage, tele- 




phone 


1.58 


Public Welfare: 




Salaries 




Bonds : 

Collectors, treas- 




urer's and Town 




Clerk's bonds . . 




Buildings and Grounds: 




Wages : 




Custodian .... $ 


624.00 


Labor on grounds 




and buildings 


252.54 


Heat 


583.92 


Light 


271.74 


Telephone 


53.36 


Repair W. Acton 




Fire House . . . 


22.00 


Repair town clock 


65.00 


Repair boiler, 




West Fire House 


156.73 


Planting trees and 




shrubs 


29.00 


Building repairs, 




Town Hall 


31.94 


Installing light 




lines 


29.00 


Electrical work . 


98.82 


Shingles, lumber, 




doors 


511.86 


Flags ; . . 


7.92 



$ 51.53 

$ 262.50 $ 8,712.42 



229.25 



—lie- 
Water 14.55 

Hose 15.06 

Wax 10.50 

Repair lawn 

mowers 17.25 

Sundry expense . .' 52.02 



$ 2,846.71 



Special Painting Fire 
Houses and new 
doors : 

Wages $ 104.96 

Paint 13.45 

Doors 193.00 

Lumber 25.58 



$ 336.99 



Protection of Persons and Property 

Police Department: 
Salaries : 

Chief $ 2,100.00 

Other officers . 409.70 

Telephone 118.71 

Gas and oil 328.54 

Auto Repairs . . . 191.92 
Radio service and 

parts 106.20 

Insurance 14.25 

Office supplies, 

postage 50.84 

Batteries 4.80 

Signs 3.75 

Belt 4.50 

— $ 3,333.21 



—117— 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and Wages: 

Annual $ 458.76 

Fires 1,074.05 

Janitors 360.00 

Heat 393.00 

Light 127.39 

Telephone 87.32 

Gas and oil 77.57 

Repairing equip- 
ment 104.52 

New equipment . 385.19 

Chains 33.00 

Water 36.00 

Printing 36.78 

Oxygen 12.76 

Foamite charges 7.80 

Gloves 13.75 

Repairing 56.00 

Sundry Expense . 54.14 

$ 3,318.02 

Forest Fires : 

Wages for fires ... $ 971.20 

Hydrants : 

West and South 

Water District 

Rental $ 3,200.00 

Town of Concord 253.00 3,453.00 
Moth Department: 
Wages: 

Supt $ 318.00 

Labor 234.36 

Trucks 92.18 

Gas, oil 64.82 

Spraying material 459.71 

Sundry expenses 25.45 

$ 1,194.52 



■118— 



Tree Warden: 




Wages : 




Supt $ 


569.10 


Labor 


408.59 


Trucks 


328.09 


Rent for equip- 




ment ' 


25.00 


Tools 


41.25 


Sundry expenses. 


28.70 


- 


$ 1,400.73 


Special Repairing Sprayer: 


Labor and parts 




Health and Sanitation 


Board of Health : 




Salaries and Wages: 




Agent $ 


68.80 


Labor at Town 




dump 


693.20 


Town nurse .... 


1,750.16 


Special nurses, 




includes trans- 




portation .... 


960.00 


Professional ser- 




vices clinic , . . 


130.00 


Transportation, 




town nurse . . . 


350.00 


Supplies town 




nurse 


166.12 


Sundry expense . . . 


13.64 


Garbage Disposal: 




Collection of gar- 




bage as per con- 




tract $1,600.00 


Advertising 


10.88 


Sundry expenses . 


20.00 



$ 140.67 



$ 4,131.92 



1,630.88 



—119— 

Dog Officer: 

Keeping and de- 
stroying dogs . 168.00 

Highways 

Village : 
Wages : 

Supt $ 274.55 

Labor 483.25 

Trucks 304.12 

Gas and oil 23.70 

Paint 20.01 

Telephone 15.16 

Kerosene 10.60 

Tools 32.22 

Sundry expense 23.79 

Lumber, cement 12.60 



Chapter 81 : 
Wages : 

Supt $ 1,228.15 

Labor 3,398.86 

Trucks 2,550.20 

Rental of equip- 
ment 1,205.88 

Broken stone .... 2,477.09 

Patching material 347.94 

Oil and tar 2,276.42 

Rail posts ...... 58.50 

Cement 42.50 

Lumber 398.62 

Gravel 111.00 

Culvert 131.32 

Sundry expense . 23.52 



$ 1,200.00 



$14,250.00 



—120— 



Chapter 90: Maintenance 
Wages : 

Supt $ 304.80 

Labor 827.84 

Trucks 506.70 

Rental of equip- ' 

ment 197.50 

Broken stone . . . 1,901.43 

Oil and tar 2,125.07 

Patching material 135.27 



Chapter 90 : Concord Road 

Wages : 

Supt $ 67.00 

Labor 138.96 

Trucks 241.70 

Rental of equip- 
ment 262.50 

Gravel 74.40 

Lumber 56.23 



Snow Removal : 
Wages : 

Supt $ 424.52 

Labor 905.19 

Trucks 898.15 

Plowing snow . . . 1,357.20 
Rental of equip- 
ment 28.88 

Salt 214.50 

Sand 19.60 

Repairs and parts 92.51 

Blades 52.23 

Sundry expense . . 6.06 



$ 5,998.61 



$ 840.79 



$ 3,998.84 



—121— 

Machinery Account : 
New equipment 

and tools $ 132.17 

Cutting edges 187.79 

Tires and tube . . 76.00 

Repairs and parts 390.26 

Fuel oil, kerosene 26.87 

Lumber 11.42 

Gas, oil 112.51 

Paint 15.04 

Penetrating oil . . 5.00 

Sundry expense . 16.10 



Street Lighting : , 




Street lighting . . $ 


3,336.77 


Installing light . . 


13.63 




Charities 


Public Welfare : 




Temporary Aid : 




Cash to indi- 




viduals $ 


790.00 


Provisions .... 


69.46 


Fuel 


79.86 


Light 


6.68 


Medical and 




hospital .... 


545.10 


Relief by .other 




cities and 




towns 


2,849.89 


Professional ser- 




vices a/c out- 




side aid .... 


25.00 



$ 973.16 



$ 3,350.40 



$ 4,365.99 



4 

—122— 

Administration Account: 

Books, forms, sta- 
tionery $ 29.02 

Filing cabinet . . . 30.00 

Attending meet- 
ings 38.00 

$ 97.02 

Old Age Assistance : 

Cash Aid $17,143.66 

Indirect payments 80.00 

Aid by other -cities 

and towns .... 604.15 

$17,827.81 

U.S. Grant: 

Cash Aid $13,828.39 

Administration : 
Salary and 

expenses . . . 460.89 $14,289.28 $32,117.09 

Aid to Dependent 
Children : 
Cash Aid $ 1,908.20 $ 1,908.20 

U. S. Grant: 

Cash Aid 579.50 

Administrative Ac- 
count : 
Salary and ex- 
penses 16.51 596.01 2,504.21 

Soldiers' Benefits : 

Provisions $ 47.34 

Fuel 69.14 

Medicals and hos- 
pital 128.50 

Transportation . . 30.25 

Rent 47.00 

$ 322.23 



123— 



lucation : 

Report of School 




Committee 


$58,997.78 


lecial Appropriations: 




part time janitor 


$ 71.28 


New grates 


325.00 


Power metal work- 




ing machines . 


1,467.36 


Repairing high 




school roof . . . 


1,490.00 


Fluorescent light- 




ing 


159.80 


Mass. Teachers' 




Retirement Bd. 


234.67 



Library 



Maintenance : 




Librarian $ 


102.00 


Asst. Librarian . . 


204.00 


Janitor / . . 


153.00 


Heat 


227.83 


Light 


51.17 


Writing cards, bind- 




ing, etc 


22.90 


Postage 


1.91 


Insurance 


30.95 


Water 


12.00 


Work on shade trees 


27.80 


Service pipe (elec- 




tricity) 


12.90 


Book plates ' 


11.10 


Sundry expense . 


5.15 



$ 862.71 



—124- 



Branch Library : 








Librarians .... $ 


208.00 






Lights 


8.68 






Transporting 








books 


50.00 






Fuel ^ 


53.76 






Janitor 


21.60 










341.99 


$ 1,204.70 






Library books . . 






373.79 



Cemeteries 

Wages : 

Supts $ 1,425.90 

Labor 623.90 

Trucks 65.50 

Water 86.95 

Flowers, shrubs . . . 28.50 

Insurance 16.00 

Repairing mowers . 44.06 

Cement 11.05 

Loam 40.00 

Fertilizer 43.20 

Tools 20.81 

Pipe and labor .... 12.45 

Paint 11.02 

Gasoline 7.05 

Postage, telephone 

stationery .... 23.94 

Grass seed 7.68 

Lumber 8.12 

Lighting chapel . . . 9.75 

Sundry expense . . . 7.29 

$ 2,443.17 



—125— 

Perpetual Care: 

Wages : 

Supts $ 679.95 

Labor 487.18 

Trucking 8.50 

Flowers 72.70 

Sundry expense . 30.85 



$ 1,279.18 



Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund : 

Care of lots $ 25.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund: 
Wages: 

Supt $ 921.60 

Labor 513.36 

Trucking 189.23 

Loam 134.00 

Broken stone .... 58.93 

Tar 482.68 

Weed killer 58.48 

Flowers 26.80 

Sundry expense . 32.90 

$ 2,417.98 





Rationing Board 


Wages: 




Clerks 


$ 435.30 


Telephone 


111.28 


Stationery 


47.43 


Repairing typewriter 


8.00 


Sundry items 


2.49 



$ 604.50 



—126— 

Committee on Public Safety: 
Wages : 

Clerks $ 301.28 

Telephone 22.16 

Bond, Fire Dept. . . 5.00 

Property shortages 

State Guard . . ' 30.50 

$ 358.94 

Liability Insurance 

Premium 600.00 

Jones Conununity Field 

Wages : 

Labor $ 75.91 

Lumber 3.65 

79.56 

Memorial Day 

Music $ 125.00 

Flags 28.62 

Flowers, wreaths . . 70.15 

Refreshments 10.22 

Post cards 1.50 

$ 235.49 





Unclassified 


Robbery Insurance . 


$ 75.00 


Legal and court 




expense 


106.30 


Flags 


25.95 


Printed cards 


9.75 


Writing and execut- 




ing deed 


7.00 


1943 Bills 





224.00 
388.65 



High School bonds . 
High School addi- 
tional bond 

Fire truck note . . . . 



—127— 

Notes and Bonds 

$ 1,000.00 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 



$ 3,000.00 



Interest on Notes and Bonds 



High School Bonds .$ 80.00 
High School addition 210.00 

Fire equipment notes 30.00 



Interest on High- 




way Loans . . 








No Appropriation Items 


Agency : 






State taxes . . 


. . . 


$ 7,986.00 


State parks . . 


. . . 


134.37 


State auditing 


. . . 


710.69 


County tax . . 


. . . 


5,108.21 


County hospita 


1 as- 




sessment . . 




1,286.80 


Refunds : 




Motor vehicle 


ex- 




cise taxes . 


. . . 


$ 28.20 


Real estate . , 




73.50 



$ 320.00 
22.50 



$15,226.07 



Tailings account . . 
Cemetery land fund 

purchase of lot . 
Highway loan . . . . 
County dog licenses 



101.70 
169.47 

10.00 

10,000.00 

930.80 



—128— 

Refund Town of 
Boxboro, V e r- 
payment .39 

Total Expenditures $204,647.64 

Cash Balance 

Dec. 31, 1944 . .' 93,582.31 



Reserve Fund Transfers 

General Government $ 112.42 

Building and Grounds 446.71 

Fire Department 325.00 

Tree Warden 750.73 

Aid to Dependent Children 175.00 



$1,809.86 
Unexpended Balance 190.14 



Machinery Fund 

Balance January 1, 1944 $ 1,146.25 

Received from Rentals 799.25 



Transferred to Rd. Mach. Acct. 1,050.00 
Balance December 31, 1944 . . . 895.50 



Cemetery Land Fund 

Balance January 1, 1944 $ 478.35 

Received from Sale of Lots .... 205.00 

Paid Repurchase of Lots $ 10.00 

Balance December 31, 1944 673.35 



$298,229.95 



$ 2,000.00 



$ 1,945.50 
1,945.50 



683.35 



683.35 



—130- 



Balance Sheet, December 31, 1944 

Assets 

Cash $ 93,532.31 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes : 
Levy of 1943 

Polls $ 26.00 

Personal Property 470.03 

Real Estate 5,628.87 

6,124.90 



Levy of 1944 

PoUs $ 144.00 

Personal Property 1,033.91 

Real Estate 15,614.92 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Levy of 1943 $ 117.55 

Levy of 1944 562.19 



16,792.83 



679.74 



Tax Judgment: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 502.62 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 

Tax Titles $ 407.84 

Tax Title Possessions 73.28 



Departmental: 

Public Welfare $ 275.00 

Old Age Assistance 175.25 

State and County Aid to Highways: 

State $ 2,498.84 

County 1,000.46 



481.12 



450.25 



3,499.30 
$122,113.07 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded Debt $ 16,000.00 



$ 16,000.00 



TRUST FUNDS 

Trust Funds, Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Town Treasurer $199,717.65 

In Custody of Trustees 3.465.54 

$203,183.19 



—131— 

Liabilities and Reserves 

County Dog Licenses $ 7.20 

Premiums on Bonds 4.25 

Old Age Assistance Recovery 361.21 

Tailings Account 102.15 

Cemetery Land Fund 673.35 

Road Machinery Fund 895.50 

Appropriation Balances: 

Road Machinery Account $ 76.84 

Concord Road, Chapter 90 2,159.21 

Fluorescent Lighting 1,340.20 

Buildings and Grounds from Acton Agricul- 
tural Holding Co 6,000.00 

9,576.25 

Trust Funds Income: 

Library Books $ 26.21 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 230.04 

256.25 

Reserve Fund — Overlay Surplus 5,903.40 

Overlays, Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1943 $ 1,241.54 

Levy of 1944 3,683.61 

4.925.15 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax $ 679.74 

Tax Title -. 481.12 

Departmental 450.25 

State and County Aid to Highways 3,499.30 

5,110.41 

Surplus Revenue 94,297.95 



$122,113.07 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Accounts: 

Fire Equipment Loan $ 2,000.00 

High School Loan 1,000.00 

School House Addition Loan 13,000.00 



$ 16,000.00 



TRUST FUNDS 

Elizabeth White Charity Fund $ 27,415.75 

Georgia E. Whitney Charity Fund 14.452.90 

Wilde Memorial Library Fund 16,376.79 

Acton Firemen's ReUef Fund 3,109.75 

West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 660.49 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 50.159.69 

Cemetery Surplus Fund 1,083.78 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 1,504.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 83.445.12 

Charlotte Conant School Fimd 1,509.38 

In Custody of Trustees: 

Charlotte L. Goodnow Fund 3,465.54 



$203,183.19 
Respectfully submitted, 

HOWARD L. JONES, To\ni Accountant 



—132— 
AUDITOR'S REPORT 



October 5, 1944. 
To the Board of Selectmen : 

Mr. Arthur W. Lee, Chairman 
Acton, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Acton for the period from 
August 22, 1943 to July 3, 1944, made in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in 
the form of a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 

Director of Accounts. 
Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Acton for the period from 
August 22, 1943, the date of the previous audit, to July 3, 
1944, and submit the following report thereon: 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books 
of the several departments receiving or disbursing money 
for the town or committing bills for collection, were exam- 
ined and checked with the books of the town accountant 
and the treasurer. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined. The receipts, as recorded, were checked with 
the treasurer's books and with the records of the several 
departments collecting money for the town, while the pay- 



—133— 

ments were checked with the treasury warrants and with 
the books of the treasurer. 

The appropriations as listed from the town clerk's 
records of town meetings, as well as the transfers from the 
reserve fund authorized by the finance committee, were 
checked to the town accountant's ledger. The ledger ac- 
counts were analyzed, the necessary adjusting entries were 
made, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this re- 
port, was prepared showing the financial condition of the 
town on July 3, 1944. This balance sheet indicates that the 
town is in very good financial condition. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined and checked. The receipts, as recorded, were com- 
pared with the records of the several departments collect- 
ing money for the town and with the other sources from 
which money was paid into the town treasury, while the 
payments were checked with the warrants of the select- 
men authorizing the disbursement of town funds. The 
cash balance on July 3, 1944, was proved by reconciliation 
of the bank balance with a statement furnished by the 
bank of deposit and by actual count of the cash in the 
office. 

The payments of maturing debt and interest were 
proved with the amounts falling due and with the can- 
celled securities on file. 

The records of tax titles held by the town were exam- 
ined and checked. The amounts added to the tax title ac- 
count were compared with the collector's records and the 
tax titles as listed were checked with the records in the 
Registry of Deeds. 

The savings bank books and securities representing 
trust fund investments in the custody of the town treasurer 
and the trustees were examined and listed. The income 
was proved, the disbursements were verified by comparison 
with the vouchers on file, and the transfers to the town 
were checked with the receipts as recorded on the treas- 
urer's cash book. 



—134— 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. The poll, property, and motor vehicle 
excise taxes outstanding at the time of the previous exam- 
ination and all subsequent commitments were audited and 
reconciled with the assessors* warrants. The payments to 
the treasurer were checked to the treasurer's cash book, 
the recorded abatements were compared with the assessors' 
records of abatements granted, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and reconciled with the respective ledger 
accounts. 

Verification of the outstanding accounts was made by 
sending notices to a number of persons whose names ap- 
peared on the books as owing money to the town, the re- 
plies received thereto indicating the accounts, as listed, are 
correct. 

The town clerks' records of sporting and dog licenses 
issued were examined, the payments to the State being 
verified by comparison with the receipts on file and the 
payments to the town treasurer being compared with the 
treasurer's cash book. 

The accounts of the public welfare, school, and cem- 
etery departments, as well as of all other departments col- 
lecting money for the town or committing bills for collec- 
tion, were examined, checked, and reconciled with the 
treasurer's and the town accountant's books. 

It was noted that the health nurse keeps' no record 
of visits and of fees collected, and it is recommended that 
such a record be kept in the future. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to 
furnish them were examined and found to be in proper 
form. 

In addition to the balance sheet referred to, there 
are appended to this report tables showing a reconciliation 
of the treasurer's and the collector's cash, summaries of the 
taxes, tax title, and departmental accounts, together with 
tables showing the trust fund transactions. 



—135— 

For the co-operation extended by the various town 
officials during the progress of the audit, I wish, on behalf 
of my assistants and for myself, to express appreciation. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance August 22, 1943 $ 19,613.53 

Receipts: 

Aug. 22 to Dec. 31, 

1943 141,241.46 

$160,854.99 

Payments : 

Aug. 22 to Dec. 31, 

1943 77,279.28 

Balance Dec. 31, 1943. 83,575.71 

$160,854.99 



Balance Jan. 1, 1944 $ 83,575.71 

Receipts Jan. 1 to 

July 3, 1944 57,192.77 

$140,768.48 

Payments : 

Jan. 1 to July 3 

1944 $97,517.81 

Balance July 3, 1944 : 
First Nat. Bank of 

Ayer $41,169.37 

Cash in office, ver- 
ified 2,081.30 

43,250.67 

$140,768.48 



—136— 

First National Bank of Ayer 

Balance July 3, 1944, 

per statement $46,242.74 

Balance July 3, 1944, 

per check register $ 41,169.37 

Outstanding checks 

July 3, 1944, pel* 

list 5,078.37 

$46,242.74 



RECONCILIATION OF COLLECTOR'S CASH 

Cash balances July 3, 1944, per schedules: 
Levy of 1942 : 

Polls $ 6.00 

Personal $ 90.88 

Real Estate 1,009.93 

$ 1,106.81 

Levy of 1943 : 

Polls $ 18.00 

Personal 74.55 

Real Estate 1,152.41 

$ 1,244.96 

Levy of 1944: 

Polls $ 38.00 

Real Estate 51.45 

$ 89.45 

Motor vehicle excise taxes : 
Levy of 1942 . .$ 26.24 
Levy of 1943 . . 20.34 

Levy of 1944 . . . 67.40 

$ 113.98 

Interest on taxes : 

Levy of 1942: 

Polls $ .40 

Personal 5.98 

Real Estate . . 72.18 



—137— 



Levy of 1943 : 








Polls .44 








Personal 2.06 








Real Estate . . 36.26 








Motor vehicle excise taxes: 








Levy of 1942 2.54 








Levy of 1943 .99 










$ 


120.85 




Cost on taxes : 








Levy of 1942, 








Polls 




.70 




Levy of 1943, 








Polls 




2.80 




Excess cash 








July 3, 1944 . . . 




.20 




Cash on hand July 3, 1944 : 






2,679.75 






Concord National 








Bank 


$ 


2,235.50 




In office verified . . 




444.25 


$ 2,679.75 







—138— 



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S 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

« 

of the 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31, 1944 



—143— 

ORGANIZATION 

School Committee 

Mr. Richard Lowden, Chairman .... Term expires 1945 

Mr. H. Vaughn Allen Term expires 1945 

Mrs. J. Henry Engman Term expires 1947 

Mr. Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Mrs. Arthur Fraser Term expires 1947 

Mrs. G. Howard Reed Term expires 1946 

* Meetings of the School Committee 

Regular meetings of the school committee are held 
the third Monday of each month in the high school at 8:00 
P. M. Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 

Richard B. Greenman 
Office — High School Building, Telephone 110 

School Physician Ernest A. Mayell, M. D. 

East Acton, Telephone 345-3 

School Nurse Mrs. Simon D. Taylor, R. N. 

North Acton, Telephone 33-22 

Attendance Officer . . . .' George Charter 

West Acton, Telephone 110 or 158-2 
Custodians : 

High School, Tel. 110 George Charter 

Center School, Tel. 86 Harry E. Holt 

South School, Tel. 445 Kenneth Harvey 

West School, Tel. 105 . Ernest G. Banks 

Tentative Calendar for 1945 

January 2 — Schools open. 
February 16 — Schools close. 
February 26 — Schools open. 
April 13 — Schools close. 
April 23 — Schools open. 



—144— 

May 30 — Holiday (Memorial Day). 
June 8 — Elementary schools close. 
June 15 — High School Graduation. 
June 22 — High School closes. 

School Year 1945 - 1946 

September 5 — High school opens. 
September 10 — Elementary schools open. 
October 12 — Holiday (Columbus Day). 
October 26 — Teachers* Convention. 
November 12 — Holiday (Monday after Armistice Day). 
, November 22 and 23 — Thanksgiving Recess. 
December 20 — Schools close at noon. 

1946 

January 2 — Schools open. 

February 15 — Schools close. 

February 25 — Schools open. 

April 12 — Schools close. 

April 22 — Schools open. 

May 30 and 31 — Holiday (Memorial Day). 

June 7 — Elementary schools close. 

June 14 — High School Graduation. 

June 21 — ^High school closes. 

No School Signal — All schools all day 

7 :00 A. M., fire whistle in all precincts — 2-2-2-2. 

7 :00-8 :00 A. M., radio announcements over WBZ and WEEI 



STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School (as amended by vote of the school 

committee November 2, 1943). 

Children shall not be admitted to the public schools 
unless they are 5 years, 9 months of age on or before Sep- 



—145— 

tember 1. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first 
two weeks of school. All children entering for the first 
time must present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 5% hours in the 
elementary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with 
sufficient recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened 
to pupils except by the principals, or persons delegated by 
the principals. : _£M 

3. School Buses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they atttend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils 
must meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct 
themselves properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness (as amended by 
vote of the school committee January, 1944) 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly except 
for illness. They must present a written excuse signed by 
parent or guardian stating a definite reason for each absence 
or tardiness. 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon 
not longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and 
for a longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases 

State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 55; Chapter 76, Sec- 
tion 15: 

"A child from a household where a person is ill with 
smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other 
infectious or contagious disease, or from a household ex- 
posed to contagion from any such disease in another house- 
hold, shall not attend any public school during such illness 
or exposure until the teacher of the school has been fur- 
nished with a certificate from the local board of health, 



—146— 

school physician, or from the attending physician, stating 
that danger of conveying such disease by such child has 
passed." 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to 
them by the school Authorities and shall not mar or injure 
any form of school property. 

8. Fire Drill (as amended by vote of the school commit- 
tee January, 1944) 

Fire Drills shall be held at least once a month in all 
schools. 



—147— 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
As of January 1, 1945 



Center School 



*Ruth Johnson (Mrs.), Prin. 
Dardana Berry (Mrs.) 
Helga Archer (Mrs.) 

South School 

JuUa McCarthy, Prin. 
Florence Merriam 
Carolyn Tuttle, B. S. E. 



Appt. Graduate of 

1935 L€sley School 

1943 Framingham Normal 

1943 Fitchburg Normal 



1906 Fitchburg Normal 
1927 Fitchburg Normal 
1940 Fitchburg State College 



Home Address 

West Concord 

Acton 

Stow 



South Acton 
South Acton 
South Acton 



West School 



♦Alice Feehan, B. S. E., Prin. 
Florence Rooney (Mrs.) 

(substitute) 
Carrie F. Wells (Mrs.) 

Hig^h School 

Richard B. Greenman, Prin. 
A. B., Ed. M 

Walter W. Holt, Vice-Prin. 
of S. H. S., B. S., M. A. 

**Ri chard E. Bradford, Vice- 
Prin. of J. H. S., B. S. K 

Lydia Abbott, A. B. 

Margaret Boornazian 

Marj^ Emerson (Mrs.) B. S. 

Henri- Hopkinson, L.L.B. 

Ann Horrigan, A. B. 

Marjorie Jones, B. S. 

Barbara Kunhardt (Mrs.) B. S. 

Nonna Lepp'anen, A. B. 

Frank Saillenas, B. S. E. 

Marion Towne, A. B. 



1938 Fitchburg State College South Acton 
1944 Lesley School North Acton 

1943 Fitchburg Normal South Acton 



1935 Harvard University South Acton 

1928 Dartmouth College East Acton 
1943 Bridgewater State Coll. West Acton 

1942 Colby College West Acton 

1929 Burdett College West Acton 

1943 New Hampshire Univ. South Acton 

1930 Northeastern Law School West Acton 

1944 Regis College Arlington 

1931 Simmons College South Acton 
1943 Boston University West Acton 

1943 Colby CoUege West Acton 

1944 Fitohburg State College Beverly 
1921 Smith College Concord 



Supervisors 

Dorothy Beers, B. S. P. E. 

Jeanne Toohey (Mrs.) 
Charles K. Yeremian 

* Ac ting Principal 
**Acting Vice -Principal 



1943 B. U. Sargent College South Acton 
1943 Mass. School of Art Maynard 

1941 Longy School of Music Watertown 



—148— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Voters of Acton: 

The School Committee herewith submits its report with 
that of the superintendent, which has been accepted by the 
Committee. 

The Committee organized March 7 with one new mem- 
ber, Mrs. J. Henry Engman. Mr. Robert C. Hall resigned 
June 6 and the Committee was unanimous in its approval 
of Mr. H. Vaughn Allen to fill the vacancy. 

The high school roof and parapet have been water- 
proofed by Chapman Waterproofing Company with a full 
ten-year guarantee. 

The power metal-working machines have been installed 
in the high school. 

Fluorescent lighting fixtures have been installed in 
some of the elementary classrooms and we are planning in 
bur budget for the remaining rooms. 

Our budget for 1945 necessarily calls for an increase. 
We are planning to meet the exact needs of each depart- 
ment of the budget. 

The Committee plans to complete its efforts of the past 
few years to bring all textbooks up to date and hereafter 
keep them so. 

We have revised the salary schedule, basing it on the 
state minimum of $1,200. These salaries are basic and do 
not include the present war allowance of $200. 
Revised Salary Schedule for Teachers (Voted at the regular 
School Committee meeting on January 2, 1945). 

Minimum Maximum 

Elementary— Women $1200 $1700 

Principals 1300 1800 

High School— Women 1200 1700 

Men 1400 1900 



—149— 

Vice-principal of senior 

high school 2100 

Superintendent of schools 
and high school prin- 
cipal 3000 none set 

Substitutes $5 a day in all positions 

$2.50 for half a day 

1. Starting salary to depend on training and ex- 
perience. 

2. Annual increments of $100 as a rule. 

3. Difference of $500 between minimum and maxi- 
mum. 

4. Effective July 1, 1945, all teaching personnel shall 
take courses in education worth 6 hours of credit every 4 
years, but not more than 3 hours will be credited in one 
year. The courses shall be in the subject matter field of the 
teacher, or in one related to it. 

5. Teachers are allowed 5 days of sick-leave each 
school year. 

Acton High School has a good scholastic rating. The 
Massachusetts Department of Education has certified it as 
a Class A school for 1944, and the New England College 
Admissions Board has extended the certifying privilege of 
the school to December 31, 1948. Students with a B aver- 
age or better in Acton may enter the following institutions 
without examinations: Amherst College, Bates College, 
Boston University, Bowdoin College, Clark University, 
Colby College, Massachusetts State College, Middlebury 
College, Trinity College, Tufts College, Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, Williams College, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 
The certifying privilege is awarded to high schools on the 
basis of the college work done by their graduates. 

For the first time in Acton the Rensselaer Medal, offered 
by the Boston Alumni Association of Rensselaer Polytech- 



—150— 

nic Institute, Troy, New York, will be awarded at graduation 
in 1945 to "the male graduate selected by the school author- 
ities as the most outstanding student in Mathematics and 
Science." 

On April 20, 1938, The National Honor Society of Sec- 
ondary Schools grante'd Charter Number 2062 to the Acton 
High School Chapter. At graduation gold pins represent- 
ing membership in th'e Society are awarded the ranking 
fifteen per cent of the senior class. 

Recommendations : 

All walls of the high school need waterproofing. We 
recommend that one wall be done each year for the next 
four years and we include the north wall in our budget for 
1945. 

A fan ventilator in the second floor boys' toilet must 
be installed this year to meet state requirements. 

Fluorescent lighting in the remaining elementary class- 
rooms. 

Chain-link fence next to Route 27 at the Center School. 

Necessary repairs of the heating system at the West 
School and curtain replacements in all schools. 

The usual minor repairs and replacement of equipment. 

There are several projects that should be considered 
in the near future: 

Automatic heat in the high school. 

Insulation under the high school roof. 

Lighting in the high school. 

Re-decorating of Blanchard Hall. 

Painting high school inside and out. 

The Committee requests that you appropriate the sum 
of $69,117.50 for 1945. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD A. LOWDEN, 

Chairman. 



—151— 

Comparison of Net Cost of Acton Schools 

Received by Town Treasurer on account of schools: 

1943 1944 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 
General School Fund, Part 1 
(State aid on account of 

teachers' salaries) $ 4,553.00 $ 4,820.00 

Tuition and Transportation 

of State Wards (full) . . 1,222.01 1,214.45 

Vocational Education (one- 
half) — Arthur A. Hansen 
Trade School, Waltham 
Co-op. Trade School, 
Worcester Boys' Evening 

Trade School 137.78 39.06 

City of Boston, tuition of 

wards 184.68 150.89 

Town of Boxboro, tuition 2,856.11 3,127.92 

Town of Westford, tuition . . 335.09 334.31 
Boston Typewriter Company 
5 typewriters sold to U. S. 
Treasury Dept. Procure- 
ment Program 190.00 

Acton High School — Conant 

Library 8.71 

Ind. Arts Shop 22.87 



Total received $ 9,478.67 $ 9,718.21 

Appropriated $58,000.00 $59,000.00 

Spent from appropriation. 57,990.92 58,997.88 

Received by town treasurer 9,478.67 9,718.21 



Net cost $48,512.25 $49,279.67 



—162— 

Notes : 

1. Receipts from the Massachusetts General School 
Fund, Part I, on account of teachers' salaries have 
increased steadily in the last three years. 

1942 $4519 

1943 4553 

1944 4820 

2. In 1944 the net cost of schools ($49,279.67) was 
16% less than the appropriation ($59,000). 

3. In comparing the school costs in 1943 and 1944, we 
find the increase in appropriation was $1,000, but 
the increase in net cost was only $767.42 because 
the receipts increased $239.54. 



ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

1945 Budget, Revised at Joint Meeting with Finance Com- 
mittee, December 29, 1944 

1944 1945 

Appropriated Proposed 

General Office Ex- 
pense $ 500.00 $ 500.00 

Salaries of teachers, 
supervisors, princi- 
cipals and supt.. . 42,504.00 44,500.00 

Mass. Teachers' Re- 
tirement Board 
(required by law 
for teachers in 
service) 217.50 

Textbooks 986.00 2,500.00 

Stationery and Misc. 

supplies 1,200.00 1,400.00 

Wages of janitors . 4,440.00 5,520.00 

Fuel 2,180.00 2,180.00 



« 


—158— 






Janitors' Supplies. . 








and power 




1,200.00 


1,400.00 


Repairs and replace- 








ments 




600.00 


4,500.00 


Fluorescent light- 








ing in elem. 








schools 


$1,550.00 






Waterproofing north 


I 






wall of H. S. ... 


1,600.00 






Usual general and 








unforseen items 


1,350.00 . 








$4,500.00 




Libraries 




200.00 


300.00 


Health 




300.00 


300.00 


Transportation .... 




4,750.00 


5,000.00 


Sundries 




140.00 


100.00 


Vocational education 






100.00 


Outlay 






600.00 


Center School 








Fence 


300.00 






Ventilation in 








H. S. Boys' 








room 


300.00 








$600.00 





$59,000.00 $69,117.50 



Special Articles: 



Machines $1,500.00 

Lighting 1,500.00 

H. S. roof 1,500.00 

Retirement 277.88 4,777.88 



$63,777.88 



•154— 



« 



Paid for Support for Year Ending December 31, 1944 

Superintendent, Salary $ 2,000.08 

Office and Traveling Expenses 609.62 

Total General Control $ 2,609.70 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors' Salaries, Art, Music, Physical 

Education $ 4,059.00 

High School PrincipaFs Salary 1,333.28 

High School Teachers' Salaries 20,977.10 

Elementary Principals' Salaries 5,047.50 

Elementary Teachers' Salaries 8,757.50 



$40,174.38 



High School Textbooks $ 391.17 

Elementary Textbooks 814.93 

High School Stationery and Supplies 1,019.44 

Elementary Stationery and Supplies 466.38 



$ 2,691.92 

High School Operating Expenses 

Janitor $ 2,023.27 

Fuel 333.20 

Miscellaneous 1,131.79 



$ 3,488.26 



Elementary Operating Expenses 

Janitors $ 2,440.00 

Fuel 1,032.50 

Miscellaneous 488.97 



$ 3,961.47 
Total Operating Expenses $ 7,449.73 



—155— 

High School Maintenance and Repairs .... $ 434.81 

Elementary Maintenance and Repairs .... 420.16 

Total Maintenance and Repairs $ 854.97 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health, High $ 127.14 

Health, Elementary 125.00 

Libraries, High 103.61 

Transportation 4,750.00 

Vocational Education 18.70 

Miscellaneous Expenses, High 91.75 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Elementary .88 



5,271.08 



Total Expended $58,997.78 

Unexpended Balance 2.22 



Appropriation $59,000.00 

Special Appropriations 

Teachers' Retirement Board (assessments 

due for those in military service) $ 234.67 

Chapman Waterproofing Company, high 

school roof 1,490.00 

Lynch and Woodward, high school grates . . 325.00 

R. M. Prentiss & Son, elementary light 

fixtures 159.80 

Brodhead-Garrett Company 

Grinder $ 66.00 

Milling Machine and Shaper . . 955.30 

Lathe, Motor, Accessories 446.06 

1,467.36 



John Howard, Assistant to Custodian .... 71.28 

$ 3,748.11 



—156— 
Report of the Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee of Acton, Massachusetts 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

This is my fourth annual report, which covers the year 
ending December 31, 1944. 

Teachers 

Since January 1, 1944, the following teachers have re- 
signed to take other teaching positions : 

Miss Henrietta Schmidt — Junior High School subjects. 

Mr. Wilbert H. Hayes — Industrial Arts. 

Miss M. Grace Callanan — Principal of West School. 

Mrs. Ethel M. Bailey — Grades 5 and 6, West School. 

The following teachers were appointed: 

Miss Ann Horrigan — Junior High School subjects. 

Mr. Frank A. Saulenas — Industrial Arts. 

Mrs. Ethel M. Bailey — Grades 5 and 6 in West School. 

Miss Alice Feehan — Acting Principal of West School. 

Budget 

Your attention is called to the net cost of our schools 
rather than to the amount appropriated. In 1944 the ap- 
propriation was $59,000, but the net cost was only $49,- 
279.67. The amount received by the town in 1944 on ac- 
count of schools was $9,718.21, about 16% of the appropri- 
ation. The receipts are listed earlier in this report under 
''Comparison of Net Cost of Acton* Schools." 

The committee has prepared a single inclusive budget 
for all school expenses, as recommended in "Massachusetts 
Public School Administration," a pamphlet issued by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education interpreting the 
general school laws. The amount requested is $69,117.50, 
which gives a true picture of the total needed for schools 
in 1945. 



—157— • 



School Plant 



Heating problems in the elementary schools continue 
to be an expense, and in the high school a number of exten- 
sive repairs and replacements must be expected in the near 
future, as listed in the school committee report. 

Three Special Articles Voted in 1944 

All four new machines for the shop have arrived: 
grinder, metal lathe, milling machine, and shaper. Some 
wiring remains to be done. The high school roof was water- 
proofed in June, and fluorescent lighting, as specified by a 
school architect and a lighting specialist, has been installed 
in four of the nine elementary classrooms. Those who have 
seen the effect of these modem fixtures are impressed with 
the improvement. 

Special Articles in 1945 

1. Unpaid Bill under Special Appropriation in 1944 
for Fluorescent Lighting in the Elementary Schools — $77.80. 

To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$77.80 to pay the balance due on the installation of fluores- 
cent lighting in the elementary schools. 

2. Election of School Building Committee at Town 
Meeting in 1945 — $500. 

To see if the town will vote to elect by the town meet- 
ing a School Building Committee of three, working with the 
School Committee and the Superintendent, to survey the 
elementary school needs of the town, secure plans, and dis- 
cover the cost of a central 8-grade elementary school, in- 
cluding sub-primary department, and the cost of three new 
8-grade elementary schools, including sub-primary de- 
partment, one in each precinct; and to see if the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the 
use of the School Building Committee, and instruct it to 
report to the town at the next annual or a special town 
meeting. 



—IBS- 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

The teachers, some of the textbooks, and the methods 
found in our elementary schools are to be commended, but 
the expense of operating three old buildings and the two 
grades in a room require our attention in the near future. 
The elementary princip-als' reports indicate how much is be- 
ing accomplished under difficulties, but improved housing 
of our first eight grades will make possible a healthier en- 
vironment and much more efficient training. 

Principals' Reports 

Center School: 

The Center School opened in September with the same 
staff of teachers : Mrs. Archer in Grades 1 and 2, Mrs. 
Johnson in Grades 3 and 4, and Mrs. Berry in Grades 5 and 
6. The total enrollment was 89. Because the rooms are 
small, crowded conditions prevail. The average number of 
pupils bringing lunches is 65. Again, due to the lack of 
space, each teacher must have her own pupils in her room 
everj^ day for lunch. The average number of children buy- 
ing milk is 28. The importance of good teeth, health and 
work habits is being stressed in all the grades. 

Milkweed pods were gathered in the fall and defense 
stamps are being sold regularly. A Christmas program was 
held for the parents. At the close of the program a ^*White 
Elephant Sale" was held in the teachers' room. The pro- 
ceeds, amounting to $11, will be used toward the purchase 
of an Estey portable organ for the school. The Acton 
Center Woman's Club generously started the fund by donat- 
ing $10. New fluorescent lights have been installed in Mrs. 
Berry's room and a snow fence has been placed in front 
of the building along Main Street. This has proved most 
helpful and has done a great deal to keep the children out 
of the street. 

I respectfully submit for consideration the following 
recommendations : 



—159— 

1. A better heating system so that all the rooms can 
be more uniformly heated. 

2. More adequate playground equipment. 

3. Several new desks and chairs. 

4. New shades for Grades 1 and 2 and 5 and 6. 

5. Better toilet facilities. 

An effort is being made by all of us to try to make the 
boys and girls who are under our care good citizens. 

We appreciate the fine spirit of co-operation and help- 
fulness given us by the parents. We are especially grate- 
ful to Mr. Arthur F. Davis, librarian and artist, for his 
beautiful landscape of a scene near the school. He gave 
this oil painting, measuring 36 x 40 inches, to the Center 
School and it is to be hung in the primary room. 

Ruth Johnson, 

Acting Principal. 

South Acton School : 

The South Acton School opened September 11, 1944, 
with an enrollment of 86 pupils. The present enrollment 
is 90. The same staff of teachers is employed: Miss Merriam 
in Grades 1 and 2 has 36 pupils. Miss McCarthy in Grades 3 
and 4 has 28 pupils, and Miss Tuttle in Grades 5 and 6 has 
26 pupils. The average number of children bringing 
lunches at noon is 45. Fire drills are held monthly. Over 
50 bottles of milk have been sold daily since October 23. 
Miss Merriam and Miss McCarthy were able to attend the 
three-day conference for Elementary Teachers at Bridge- 
water State Teachers' College in June. Teachers try to 
emphasize the importance of clean physical habits and 
clean talk, consideration for the rights of others, respect 
for constituted authority, and regard for civic responsibility. 

Early in the fall the school engaged in the project of 
gathering milk weed pods, the floss to be used for lining 
life jackets. This project was very successful as twenty- 
two bags of pods were collected. We are also selling War 



• —160— 

Savings Stamps. The Junior Red Cross enrollment was 
87%. While the amount of money represented in the last 
two projects is satisfactory — even generous — the enroll- 
ment in each should be higher. We hope to increase the 
percentage buying War Savings Stamps before the end of 
the school year. 

An Estey Organ purchased with the cash donations 
from the Music Fund and the Acton Parent-Teacher As- 
sociation, has proved most useful in the music work. The 
pupils and teachers extend their thanks for the financial 
aid which made this instrument available. Four pupils 
are receiving instruction on other instruments from the 
music supervisor. 

The new lighting in our school rooms is a great im- 
provement on the old and is m.uch appreciated by pupils 
and teachers. I respectfully submit for consideration the 
following recommendations: that the desks in the lunch 
room be mounted on strapping to allow moving about so 
that the room may be used for assembly; that this same 
room be used as a first grade room, through the employ- 
ment of a fourth teacher; and that a bicycle rack be built 
at the rear of the building. 

Julia L. McCarthy, 

Principal. 

West School: 

At the time of this writing the enrollment in the 
West School is 86 pupils. There are three teachers in the 
building: Mrs. Wells in Grades 1 and 2, Miss Feehan in 
Grades 3 and 4, and Mrs. Rooney in Grades 5 and 6. 
There is great need for one more teacher in our building. 
We feel that if the first grade could be by itself, there would 
in time be less need for a teacher of remedial work. 

I feel that the spirit of the teachers and pupils in the 
West School is, and has been, very fine, as may be seen in 
the success of every project undertaken. A good example 



_161— 

of this is an operetta, which was held last school term. 
It was highly successful dramatically and financially, the 
net profit being $40. Because our operetta was such a finan- 
cial success, we were able to purchase a small Estey organ, 
which is now being used as a teaching aid in our music 
classes. 

Up to this date our stamp sales total $364.10. During 
the month of November our percentage was 94%. Our 
goal is set for 100%. With the present enthusiasm of the 
pupils I am sure we will attain it. 

We reached the 100% mark in our contributions to 
the Junior Red Cross. 

Our pupils co-operated wholeheartedly during the 
milkweed floss drive, the results being a total of eight bags. 

In regard to the book situation in my building, let me 
say this: Mr. Greenman is well aware of the fact that we 
are badly in need of supplementary readers. I know that 
the purchase of them is uppermost in his mind at the present 
time. Mrs. Wells has no reading material to use outside 
of her basic reader. My supplementary readers and those 
in Grades 5 and 6 date back to the early nineteen hundreds, 
the results being that we have maintained high standards 
in the Binet Achievement Tests only because the teachers 
^ave devoted many hours, outside of school time, prepar- 
ing work to make up for the lack of textbooks. Much has 
been done in the past three years to supply us with new 
books. We appreciate the efforts of our superintendent 
nd school committee, but there is a great deal more to be 
done. 

The teachers in the West School are now striving to 
make the building more attractive and more comfortable. 
The walls and woodwork have not been painted for ten 
years or more. New bulletin boards have been installed but 
never painted; therefore, they were drab looking. With 
the help of two of our boys we have accomplished the fol- 
lowing: 



—162— ^ 

Bulletin boards in Grades 1 and 2, 3 and 4 have 
been given two coats of paint. We have enough paint 
to finish the boards in Grades 5 and 6. 

Four window ventilating boards were made of old 
table leaves and painted. These were much needed. 

Four lunchroom tables were painted. 

One sand table has been painted. Two others are 
to be done. 

One steam radiator has been painted with alumi- 
num paint, and others are to be done. 

We have taken scraps of materials which were 
left when our bulletin boards were installed, and used 
them to make the unattractive corners both useful and 
pleasant in appearance. 

Indirect lighting has been installed in Miss Fee- 
han's room. 

Mr. Banks sanded and varnished the desks in Miss 
Feehan's room. He also removed the paint from one 
of the blackboards making it usable. The walls above 
the woodwork were washed in Miss Feehan's room 
and Mrs. Rooney*s room. Mrs. Wells' room is badly in 
need of washing and paint. The desks in two rooms 
need sanding and varnishing. 

A movable blackboard and new maps have been 
purchased for Grades 5 and 6. They are very valuable 
teaching aids. 

Mrs. Wells attended the Bridgewater Conference 
held last July and was awarded a certificate of attend- 
ance for credit. 

I would like at this time to" extend the sincere 
thanks of the teachers in the West School to the parents 
of the children who attend our school. We have at 
all times received their wholehearted co-operation, 
which insures success in our endeavors. 

Alice M. Feehan, 

Acting Principal. 



—163— 

Academic Standing of the High School 

The scholastic standing of the high school is good and 
it is improving. Eligibility rules for participation in athletics 
and other school activities require more than the rules of 
the Massachusetts High School Principals* Association, 
which were followed by most schools. In Acton the eligibil- 
ity requirements for athletics follow: 

1. C or higher in 4 prepared subjects in the week and 
8-week period before that of the game, and no 
warning card marks below 60 in those subjects. 

2. Effort mark of 1 and conduct mark of S in all sub- 
jects and general school conduct. 

3. Students may not practice or play any day they are 
absent. 

The point system has been revised upward slightly by 
vote of the school committee so that 20 points are required 
for promotion to each grade, starting with 1944-1945. 
Diploma requirements also were revised so that, starting 
with 1944-1945, all diplomas will be marked with the 
course completed: College Preparatory, Business, Practical 
Arts, or General. Students must take the required subjects 
to remain in a course. Students who do not have all the 
required subjects in a course will have a diploma marked 
'^General.'' 

Requirements for the honor roll are higher than they 
are in many schools: all A's for high honors; two or more 
A's in prepared subjects and the rest B*s for honors. 

In Massachusetts 10% is the average portion of each 
senior class entering college, and in Acton 25% of the Class 
of 1944 are in college including Boston University, Whea- 
ton College in Illinois, and Colby Junior College. One mem- 
ber will enter Colby College. 

The Iowa Tests of Educational Development given in 
1943-1944 to all students in Grades 9-12 showed that many 



—164— 

1 our students stand in the top 10% among 50,000 students 
who have taken the tests. 

Acton High School has the teachers capable of pre- 
paring students to enter any college or technical school, 
and it provides the program of studies and tools of learn- 
ing needed for this purpose. There is a growing interest in 
further education among our students and the records in- 
dicate that more of them are entering colleges and schools 
of nursing. 



Scholarships 

Phyllis Carolyn Cook was awarded a $100 scholarship 
by the trustees of the Acton High School Scholarship Fund. 
She entered Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. Contri- 
butors to this fund in 1944 were the West Acton Woman's 
Club, the Acton Parent-Teacher Association, and the Class 
of 1944. The fund balance is $556.94. 

Scholarships were ajso awarded by the Acton Center 
Woman's Club to Shirley Anne Rimbach and Zillah Eliza- 
beth Gates. 



Sale of War Stamps and Bonds 

During the school year 1943-44 the sale of war stamps 
and bonds aVnounted to $8,213.11, and for October, Novem- 
ber, and December, 1944, the total was $3,272.25. A group 
of junior and senior girls under the direction of Miss Boor- 
nazian takes orders in each home-room one day a week. 



—165— 



Students of Acton Who Gave Their Lives in 1944 

Robert Webber McAllaster, who attended the 
West School. 

Robert Everett Henry Thatcher, who graduated 
from Acton High School in 1934. 

David Lester Jenks, who graduated from Acton 
High School in 1939, was president of his 
class in the senior year. He was active in 
dramatics and athletics, taking part in two 
plays and winning letters in football, basket- 
ball, and baseball. 



Parent-Teacher Association 

Under the leadership of Mr. Philip W. Goldthwaite 
for 1943-44 and Mrs. Wilson W. Chatfield and Mrs. Richard 
B. Greenman for 1944-45, the Acton Parent-Teacher As- 
sociation has grown in its spirit of friendliness and united 
interest in the school department. Among the worthy pro- 
jects it has sponsored are the scholarship fund, gift of a 
16 mm. sound motion picture projector, dancing classes for 
all students, two paper drives (one shared equally with the 
Boy Scouts), a semi-formal dance, a trip to the Billerica 
House of Correction, and the annual declamation contest. 

Music and refreshments at each meeting emphasize the 
informal nature of the organization. 

Many interesting speakers addressed the association. 
Mrs. Victor Peppard of South Acton spoke on "Exchange 
Students" and Mrs. Walter Early, Past President of the 



—166— 

Mass. American Legion Auxiliary spoke on *'The Home." 
In May, Mr. Loring Kew, Master of the Billerica House of 
Correction, spoke on youth problems and invited members 
to visit his institution. 

In the fall. Miss Grace Pierce, Director of Music at 
the Lowell State Teachers' College, presented an excellent 
program with the Senior Girls' Choir, and Dr. Wendell J. 
Yeo, Associate Professor at the Boston University School 
of Education, spoke on "Parents as Vocational Advisers." 
An unusual meeting was held in December when the sound 
film "Pop Rings the Bell" was shown, indicating the value to 
a town of the investment in its schools. Mimeographed 
copies of the tentative 1945 School Department Budget were 
circulated for discussion following the film. A definite 
spirit of support was noticed as those present asked for in- 
formation. 

The schools of Acton have a promising future which 
the Parent-Teacher Association can and will influence to a 
great degree. 

4-H Club 

The Acton 4-H Clubs have done especially well in food 
production and canning. In Middlesex County the Acton 
High School Agriculture Club has the longest continuous 
existence of any such club, and the local 4-H Town Com- 
mittee leads in fund raising. The Agriculture Club held 
19 meetings, half of which were illustrated with films, 
slides, and film strips. Acton is among the top communi- 
ties for the percentage of pupils participating in 4-H Clubs, 
and the Town Committee chairmen in 1944 are to be recog- 
nized for this record: Mrs. Warren E. Hartwell and Mr. 
Edward Estabrook. 

Recommendations 

In 1943 the school committee made the position of 
teacher of physical education for the elementary pupils and 



—167— 

the high school girls a full time position. The results may 
be seen among the girls in their enthusiasm for physical edu- 
cation and their athletic successes. 

I strongly recommend a position of full time teacher 
of physical education and health among the high school 
boys combined with the coaching of all sports. Other duties 
will be assigned. The results will be an increased interest 
and skill in athletics, which has a great influence in the 
life of a school, and adequate physical training for all high 
school boys. At present the seventh grade has very little 
physical education, and the eighth grade has only one 
period a week. All other classes have one double period a 
week. 

A further gain will be an end of the present practice 
of taking one man teacher from his classroom one full day 
a week to teach physical education. Thus students in 
United States History, which is required in Grade 11 by 
state law. World History, Civics, Grade 7 Geography, and 
Grade 8 United States History have only four-fifths of the 
instruction to which they are entitled. 

It is certain that the parents of all high school students, 
particularly the boys, will welcome such a plan. 

A second recommendation concerns the administra- 
tive organization of the school department. The position 
of Superintendent of Schools and High School Principal, 
while varied and interesting, involves too many responsi- 
bilities to be carried adequately by one man. At present 
the school system is, perhaps, not large enough for a full 
time superintendent and a full time high school principal, 
but an adjustment can be made. 

If a Central Elementary School is built after the war, 
the adjustment will come with a full time elementary 
school principal in charge of the building, including super- 
vision, requisitions, and other details now carried chiefly by 
the superintendent. If a Central Elementary School is not 
built, a plan must be worked out so that much of the high 



—168— 

school administration will be carried by a principal teach- 
ing not more than two classes. , 

Acton is in a position to develop an excellent school 
organization for small communities, and the interest of 
many townspeople in^ our schools points in this direction. 
For their loyal support and that of all parents and school 
department personnel I want to express sincere apprecia- 
tion. 

In a year of considerable progress I want to thank all 
members of the school committee for their diligence and 
spirit of co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD B. GREENMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



Reports of Special Departments 
Typewriting 

We attain a much higher standard in speed and ac- 
curacy than most schools of our size and larger. The rate 
of speed averages 30 to 65 words per minute. A special pro- 
gram planned for seniors in the college course has proved 
invaluable to them later on. Office Practice is included in 
the senior course of study. In addition to this, the use of 
the senior class in the school office on a co-operative basis 
has been more highly developed than in some schools. For 
this reason many of our students are able to take office 
positions without further training in typewriting or short- 
hand. One of our graduates, after completing our course, 
passed the civil service examination and received a rating 
of senior typist. It is further gratifying to us that so many 
of our boys in service have found their training in type- 
writing of practical value. When conditions permit, a dicta- 
phone would be most useful. 

Margaret Boornazian. 



—169— 

Home Economics Department 

We have been able to accomplish considerably more 
work in the 7th grade clothing classes this year by having 
double periods for the work instead of two single periods. 
The benefit is apparent in the quality of the work. 

The foods classes in Grade 8 carry out their require- 
ments in cooking by one double period in the laboratory with 
a single period for textbook and notebook work. The foods 
classes are not connected in any way with the cafeteria. 

The prices of food in the cafeteria have not been raised 
this year. A good substantial hot dish, along with two kinds 
of sandwiches, ice cream, cookies, dessert, and milk are 
served each day. 

An able assistant, aided by several high school girls, 
prepares this lunch. 

The cafeteria is self-sustaining. We also have a reserve 
in the bank which we hope to use in purchasing a much 
needed refrigerator and cooking utensils when these come 
on the market again. 

Mary Emerson. 



Industrial Arts 

The shop program of 1943 has been continued in 1944 
with certain adaptations to use the 4 new machines : grinder, 
metal lathe, milling machine, and shaper. 

In looking to the future we should give more attention 
to these topics: 

1. Auto Mechanics — Development of a shop course to 
provide training in the fundamentals of car oper- 
ation. 

2. Electricity — Expansion of present course to include 
the principles of electronics. 



—170— 

3. Plastics — As metal has replaced wood to a great 
extent, so will plastic compositions displace both 
wood and metal in an ever-increasing number of 
products. 

4. Guidance — Development of a course to be re- 
quired of all students because the occupational 
fields are becoming more specialized. An early 
start in a vocation is highly desirable, almost a 
necessity, today. 

Frank A. Saulenas. 



Conant Library 

A high school library is often the intellectual center of 
the school, and our small but efficient Conant Library can 
be called just that. 

The senior high students find the library not only a 
great aid in research and study, but also a center for 
pleasure reading. 

The library is used constantly by the junior high 
students in supervised reading classes. Special sections of 
the library shelves are devoted to books for this group of 
students. 

We have added 55 books since September 1944, from 
lists of books suggested by the teachers in the various de- 
partments of the school. Among these are background and 
reference books and some of the latest worthwhile fiction. 

We are planning to add to the books already purchased 
so that we can keep our library a modern, well-equipped 
tool for our students. 

Under the will of Miss Charlotte Conant, $1,500 was 
left to the Conant Library of Acton High School, the income 
ofwhich is to be spent under the supervision of the prin- 
cipal and history teacher. 



•171— 



Dramatics 



There seems to be a growing interest in dramatics 
among the older pupils. 

Last April a group of juniors went to the Massachu- 
setts High School Drama Festival at Belmont. Our play 
was ''Grandma Pulls the String," and while we did not win 
any prize, there was a great satisfaction in competing with 
schools far larger than ours, such as Belmont, Arlington, 
and Marblehead. I have already had inquiries from pupils 
about our competing again. 

The Senior Play in November was a great success. 
"Brother Goose" is a very popular royalty play. On Decem- 
ber 8, we put on the play at Lovell General Hospital North 
and we recently had a letter of commendation from the Red 
Cross officials. 

We are preparing now for the Declamation Contest in 
February and we are hoping to have a few boys take part 
this year along with the girls. 

Lydia Abbott. 

Art 

The art department has been accomplishing a great 
variety in the type of work done, and as time progresses, 
the achievements are of higher standard. We feel we could 
compete with any other school, as may be seen by the work 
on display monthly in the town library and store windows. 

The work consists of color, design, illustration, letter- 
ing, perspective, cartooning, costume design, fine arts, and 
a great deal of cut-out work. Many posters have been made 
in correlation with all school activities. Red Cross work is 
also being done again this year. 

We hope to develop further in the fine arts for we have 
some students with unusual talent. Plans are under way to 
develop a course in Art Appreciation. 



—172— 

Our equipment is gradually improving so that before 
long we shall have a well stocked studio. 

Finger painting is a very adaptable and particularly 
interesting art and one that could be introduced even in 
the primary grades. 

Jeanne Toohey. 

Music 

My fourth annual report as supervisor of music in the 
Acton schools is herewith submitted. 

I am happy to present the following recommendations 
and report of progress made by our Music Department. 

I. Recommendations 

During the last four years I have been successful in 
establishing a maximum music program under the present 
system of combined elementary school classes. Since the 
progress made in the elementary grades is vital to the pro- 
gress of the junior and senior high school classes, I wish to 
emphasize the importance of teaching elementary music to 
one grade at a time. 

A. Under the present set-up, each elementary class 
receives only a half-year instruction, for I must 
divide my time between two classes in a room. 

B. Students in the elementary schools are deprived of 
an assembly room, a very necessary factor in 
building school and citizenship spirit through 
music. 

C. There are enough students in the elementary 
schools to organize an orchestra, but because there 
is no assembly room I am unable to provide this 
important phase of instruction. 

D. Music Appreciation classes will progress much 
more rapidly under a single class set-up. 



—173— 

E. A single elementary class plan would re-vitalize 
our whole music department and increase its pro- 
gress two-fold. 

II. Instruments 

We are in need of music instruments for the band 
and the orchestra. I recommend that $5.00 a year 
rental be charged for the use of all school owned 
instruments loaned to students. The proceeds will 
be used for necessary repairs of the instruments 
and to create a music fund with which to purchase 
musical instruments. 

III. Phonograph Records 

We are in great need of suitable records for the 
elementary schools. I recommend that provision 
be made for the purchase of about 25 phonograph 
records. 

IV. Progress 

A. Two organs were purchased, one for the West 
School, the other for the South School. I have 
placed an order for the Center School. These 
organs were purchased from the proceeds of ele- 
mentary school activities and the annual music 
festival. 

B. Thirty-six pupils are now receiving instrumental 
instructions, five more than last year. I expect an 
increase of about ten pupils each year for our 
band and orchestra. 

C. An operetta was given by the West School stu- 
dents. 

D. Annual music festival. 

E. Annual instrumental class concert. 

F. High school band performed for the senior play. 



—174— 

G. High school orchestra performed for the Parent- 
Teacher Association. 

H. Girls' glee club and the orchestra performed for 
the graduation exercises. 

I. Music was provided for all high school assemblies, 
including a ► Christmas music assembly for both 
parents and students. 

The morale of all groups is excellent. 

I wish to express my most sincere appreciation to the 
superintendent and school committee for the splendid co- 
operation extended to me. 

The co-operation of the townspeople and the Acton 
School Department, which has contributed to the success of 
this program, is greatly appreciated. 

Charles K. Yeremian. 

Athletic Association 

I hereby submit my annual report as faculty manager 
of athletics for Acton High School. 

The local press and publicity agents have kept you 
fully informed as to the success of our athletic teams in the 
past year. This winter the boys' and girls' basketball teams 
have entered the Eastern Division of the Wachusett Basket- 
ball League with a great deal of pleasure and success. 

Our purpose is to keep the teams functioning properly, 
i. e., to raise money for equipment and transportation, and, 
above all, to keep the balance on the right side of the ledger. 
This latter has been possible through the co-operation of 
all the students of the school in selling magazines. They 
sold $913.50 worth of periodicals which netted the athletic 
treasury a little over $300. Added to this, receipts from 
basketball games and sale of tonic have brought our balance 
sheet to $531.89 on January 1, 1945. 

Walter W. Holt. 



—175— 

Health and Physical Education in the Elementary Schools 
and for the High School Girls 

The health and physical education program has at- 
tempted to develop strength, endurance, agility and co- 
ordination in the students, following the same trends as in 
1943. . 

More emphasis is being placed on the individual sports, 
teaching activities which will have a carry-over value from 
high school. Badminton and deck tennis equipment has 
been added. 

The elementary school program emphasizes good 
health, good posture, and good sportsmanship. 

Equipment needed at the present time : 
Two new tumbling mats. 
Badminton and volley ball standards. 
Additional badminton rackets. 
Ping pong table. 

Dorothy Beers. 

Physical Education for High School Boys 

In 1944 we have tried to reorganize the sports program 
so that we may compare favorably with other towns in 
Massachusetts. We have played 6 football games, 10 
baseball games and 21 basketball games. A particularly 
fine spirit now exists between Acton boys and boys from 
surrounding towns. The Physical Education Demonstration 
was received favorably by all present on May 11. This 
year Acton has joined the 12-team Wachusett League for 
competition in basketball and baseball. We have held to 
our strict athletic eligibility code covering marks in studies, 
attitude and conduct. 

Recommendations : 

1. Full time man as director of physical education, 
coach of all sports, assistant to the superintendent. 



—176— 

2. Each physical education class to be a mixed group 
with some boys from each grade (9-12). 

3. Three single periods a week rather than one 
double. 

4. New rigging for basketball court in Blanchard 
Hall. 

Richard E. Bradford. 



—177— 

School Membership and Attendance 

Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1944 

Age 
Boys 

Gr. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Ttl 

1 2 23 1 1 27 

2 9 12 2 23 

3 5 16 4 1 26 

4 7 8 2 17 

5 2 6 2 1 11 

6 6 10 2 1 19 

7 5 6 2 3 16 

8 6 12 6 2 26 

9 5 16 7 1 29 

10 2 8 6 16 

11 2 2 4 

12 2 6 8 









- 










- 




222 








Age 






Girls 






















Gr. 5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 16 


17 18 


19 Ttl 


1 4 


16 


















20 


2 


7 


13 


3 














23 


3 




5 


20 2 


1 












28 


4 






5 15 




1 










21 


5 






5 


16 


4 


1 








26 


6 






1 


6 


17 










24 


7 










9 


13 5 








27 


8 












6 10 


6 






22 


9 












5 


10 


3 




18 


10 














6 


15 3 




24 


11 
















5 13 


.. 


18 


12 
















8 


9 


17 



268 



—ITS- 
REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Richard B. Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetta 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my annual report as school physician. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed in 
November. 

The diphtheria and pre-school clinics were held in May 
and June. 

Students taking part in outdoor sports were examined 
prior to our general physical examinations. 

We have had some cases of measles in March, and some 
of whooping cough in the Center School previous to the 
Christmas vacation, but have been fortunate in not having 
the disease spread to the other schools. 

I thank the superintendent, nurse, teachers, and towns- 
people for their co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. MAYELL, M. D. 



—179— 
REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



r 



Mr. Richard Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1944. The physical examination of all pupils 
was made by Doctor Mayell early in the fall. Special exam- 
ination of all pupils in competitive sports was made before 
sports were started, and a re-examination wherever Doctor 
Mayell deemed it necessary. 

The usual diphtheria clinic was carried on under the 
Board of Health with the school physician in May. 

Pre-school conferences were held in May. Examina- 
tions of children to enter in September were made and 
recommendations for correction of defects. 

There was the usual run of communicable disease. If 
children with colds could be kept home we would be able 
to control some of the communicable disease and many of 
the cold epidemics. 

May I, at this time, express my appreciation for the 
support of the teachers and the superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN F. TAYLOR, R. N. 



—ISO- 
ACTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Graduation Program 

Friday, June 16, 1944 

Entrance March of Sejiiors 

'Tomp and Circumstance" Elgar 

Invocation 

The Reverend Harry B. Roberts 

Salutatory 

Arlene Alice McAvenia 

Girls' Glee Club 

"Come to the Fair" E. Martin 

"Goin' Home" Anton Dvorak 

Essay — "Athletics in Acton 

Shirley Anne Rimbach 

Vocal Solo 

"Such a Li'l Fellow" William Dichmont 

Zillah Elizabeth Gates 
Ruth Janet Durkin, Accompanist 

Presentation of Class Gift 

Donald Kenneth Willett 
President of Senior Class 

Essay and Valedictory — "Post-War Missions" 
Phyllis Carolyn Cook 

Class Song 

Words: Jane Reed 
Music: Arlene McAvenia 

Presentation of Awards 

Mr. Walter W. Holt 

Vice-Principal 

Mr. Richard B. Greenman 

Superintendent of Schools 



—181— 

National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Mr. Richard A. Lowden 
Chairman of School Committee 

Final March — 'True to Our Flag" Ellwood 

Reception to Graduates — Lawn or Science Room 



^182— 
GRADUATES, 1944 



* Barbara Ann Backman 
Marion Frances Beach 

*Evelyn Avis Collins 
*Phyllis Carolyn Cook 

* Henry Stewart Dickson 
Leona Pearl Diggs 
Ruth Janet Durkin 

**Robert Fletcher 

Zillah Elizabeth Gates 

* Barbara Aline Howell 
*Arlene Alice McAvenia 

David Thomas McGuire 

* Honor Students 
**In the Service 



Clara Newton 

Laura Jane Peterson 
*Anna Miriam Pinolehto 

Jane Reed 

Shirley Anne Rimbach 

Jean Mary Roe 

Thomas Robert Smith 

Audrey Terrell 

Francis Walther 

Alice Jeanette Wetherbee 

George Edward White 
* Donald Kenneth Willett 



Awards at Graduation : 

American Legion Medal, 'awarded by Edwards-Quimby 
Post to the senior boy and girl outstanding in scholar- 
ship, loyalty, and achievement: Barbara Ann Back- 
man, Donald Kenneth Willett. 

Washington-Franklin Medal, awarded by the Mass- 
achusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion for the best record in American History: Arlene 
Alice McAvenia. 

$25 War Bonds, awarded by Mrs. Robert Reid, Jr., to a 
senior boy and girl showing the greatest scholastic im- 
provement in the past four years and a co-operative at- 
titude through service to the school: Jean Mary Roe 
and Henry Stewart Dickson. 



INDEX 

Assessors 67 

IP Board of Health 72 

Cemetery Commissioners 78 

Dog Officer 84 

Elizabeth White Fund 79 

■ Finance Committee 93 

P Fire Department 76 

Forest Warden 77 

Inspector of Animals 69 

Librarian's Report 55 

Middlesex County Extension Service 53 

Moth Superintendent 52 

Post-War Public Works Committee 67 

Sealer's Report 52 

Selectmen's Report 14 

Schools: 

Budgets for 1944 152 

Graduation Program 180 

Organization 143 

School Committee 148 

School Nurse 179 

School Physician 178 

Superintendent 156 

Teachers 147 



Special Town Meeting (Abstract) Sept. 11, 1944 25 

State Auditor's Report 132 

Superintendent of Streets 104 

Tax Collector 80 

Town Accountant 107 

Town Clerk's Report 29 

Births 30 

Marriages 33 

Deaths 35 

Non-Resident Burials 37 

Dog Licenses ; 39 

Jury List (Revised) 1944 40 

Presidential Election (Nov. 7, 1944) 41 

Town Forest Committee 77 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 13, 1944 16 

Town Nurse 72 

Town Officers 9 

Treasurer's Report 85 

Tree Warden 52 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 69 

Police 75 

Public Welfare 73 

War Price and Rationing Board 105 

Warrant, Monday, March 5, 1945 3 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 55 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Official Boards 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 




For the Year Ending December 31 

1945 



WELCOME HOME! 



It is with sincere appreciation that we dedicate this 
year's report to the boys and girls of Acton who have so 
valiantly done their part in World War II. 

Many have returned home, many are still serving their 
Country on the home front and on foreign soil. Ten have 
paid the supreme sacrifice — they will not be forgotten. It 
is with pride that we speak of those boys — our Minutemen 
of today — who have given their lives for our freedom, our 
home — our Acton. 

Our Acton, consisting of 12,167 acres located twenty- 
four miles northwest of Boston with excellent transportation 
facilities afforded by the Boston and Maine Railroad and 
through routes 2, 27 and 111, has continued to grow since 
the first house was built on the "new grant" by Capt Thomas 
Wheeler about 1669, until at the present time we have a 
population of 2,869 people, 792 housed, 5 churches, 3 ele- 
mentary schools, 1 high school, several factories and private 
industries, with a valuation of over 83,000,000.00. 

We have been rich in hstory since that memorable April 
morning in 1775 when Capt. Isaac Davis said "I haven't a 
man who is afraid to go" and his men went bravely forward 
to Concord Bridge to repulse the enemy — likewise, down 
through the years, Acton has gone forward for home and 
liberty. 

This is our heritage, linked with loyalty and community 
friendliness; w^e trust our returning boys and girls will in- 
deed enjoy the spirit of peace and happiness in our Acton — 
their Acton. 

GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 
ARTHUR W. LEE, 
LAWRENCE DONNELLY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



3 
TOWN WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 




A€SOmi% ^ 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in said 
County, Greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Acton, qualified to vote at town meetings for the 
transaction of town affairs, to meet in their respective pre- 
cincts, to wit: 

Precinct 1 — Town Hall, Acton Center 
Precinct 2 — Universalist Church, South Acton 
Precinct 3 — Woman's Club House, West Acton. 

at 12 o'clock noon, Monday, the fourth day of March, 1946, 
by posting a copy of this warrant, by you attested, at each 
of the places as directed by vote of the town, seven days at 
least before the fourth day of March. To bring in their 
votes on one ballot for the following town officers: 

Moderator, town clerk, town treasurer, collector of taxes, 
one selectman for three years ; one assessor for three years ; 
one member of the Board of public welfare for three years ; 
four constables for one year ; one cemetery commissioner for 
three years ; two members of the school committee for three 
years; one member of the board of health for three years; 



one member of the board of health for one year to fill 
vacancy; one trustee Memorial Library for three years; one 
trustee Memorial Library for two years to fill vacancy; and 
a tree warden. 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon, and close at 
8 o'clock p. m. 

You are further requested in the name of the Common- 
wealth to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, as 
aforesaid, to meet at the Town Hall, in said Acton on Mon- 
day, the eleventh day of March, 1946, at 7:30 o'clock P. M. 
Then and there to act on the following articles: 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers and 
committees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
several reports of the town officers. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committee chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 or some other sum for the 
observance of Memorial Day, this sum to be expended under 
the direction of a committee appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, or act anything thereon. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the rev- 
enue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1946, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 
44, General Laws. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the i^se of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The amount 



spent for board and disposal of dogs will be reimbursed by 
the County of Middlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $400.00 from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery 
Account, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $500.00 or any other sum to be used, 
in conjunction with $500.00 now available, by the Town 
Porest Committee for the purpose of purchasing additional 
forest land or act anything thereon. 



Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $300.00 for necessary labor and 
material to repair the town clock, or act anything thereon. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150.00 to defray the necessary ex- 
penses of office supplies, etc., in connection with the admin- 
istration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children 
and General Relief, or act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of three to investigate 
the advisability of extending our present fire alarm box sys- 
tem and to submit report at the next annual or a special 
town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $450.00 for 
the purchase of one hose dryer for the South Acton Fire 
House, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see of the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1800.00 or some other sum, so that 
the Board of Health may contract for the collection and dis- 
posal of garbage for a period of one year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 



appropriate the sum of $250.00 for the Tree Department 
for the replacement of shade trees, or act anything thereon. 

Article 15. To see what sum of money the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary ex- 
penses of the several departments of the town and determine 
how the same shall be raised. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to have an annual audit of the various 
accounts of the town, or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
sum of 14500.00 or some other sum from the Surplus Rev- 
enue Account for the purchase of a truck for the highway 
department or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 723, Acts of 1945, being an act to 
authorize the establishment and maintenance of municipal 
departments and of districts for furnishing information, ad- 
vice and assistance to veterans of World War II or other 
veterans or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3000.00 for the maintenance of a 
municipal department or of a district for the furnishing of 
information, advice and assistance to veterans of World 
War II or other veterans as outlined in Chapter 723 (Acts 
of 1945). 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to continue 
the work of the Acton War Record Committee and that this 
committee be called the Acton War Record and Veteran's 
Service committee to handle all veteran affairs and that the 
director be appointed for a period of one year by the Board 
of Selectmen, and that the sum of $1200.00 be raised and 
appropriated for this committee, or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $600.00 for 
the purchase of a snow plow and authorize the Board of 



Selectmen to trade in or sell any old snow plows or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of 5100.00 for the painting of traffic 
lines and signs or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to elect a 
School Building Committee consisting of the chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Com- 
mittee, with the Superintendent of Schools as Clerk of the 
School Building Committee without a vote, to survey the 
elementary school needs of the town, secure preliminary 
plans, and report on the advisability of remodeling the 
present elementary schools, the estimated cost of a central 
8-grade elementary school, including sub-primary depart- 
ment, and of three new 8-grade elementary schools, including 
sub-primary department, one in each precinct; and to see 
if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1500.00 or any other sum for the use of said School Build- 
ing Committee, and to instruct it to report to the town at the 
next annual or special town meeting, or act anything hereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to transfer 

from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $4200.00 for 
the purchase of a forest fire truck and that the purchase of 
the truck be left 'to the Board of Selectmen and the Fire 
Engineers of the town and that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to use the old forest fire truck for the town sprayer 
and that the Board be also authorized to dispose of any un- 
necessary equipment or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of 8450.00 for 
the purchase of a Police Cruiser and that the Board of 
Selectmen be authorized to trade in the old cruiser or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the Assessors to publish a list of valuation of all personal 
and real estate of the town for 1946 and appropriate the sum 
of $500.00 for the same or act anything thereon. 



8 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $400.00 for 
the painting of the West Acton Fire House or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $3000.00 for new construction of 
Main Street from the Carlisle line to the State Road in 
North Acton; said money to be used in conjunction with 
13000.00 to be allotted by the County and $6000.00 to be 
allotted by the State, or act anything thereon. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the purchase of a power 
mower for the town grounds or act anything thereon. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $3500.00 from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve 
Fund or act anything thereon. 

Article 31. To see if the town will appropriate from 
the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the State's and 
County's allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 
90, provided that the reimbursement from the State and 
County be credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the purchase of addi- 
tional snow fencing or act anything thereon. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $400.00 or any other sum for the 
use of the Zoning and Building Committee or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $450.00 so that the Board of Health 
and the Committee on Post War Public Works may jointly 
-employ sanitary engineering services to make a prehminary 
study of need and possible cost of a sewerage system and 
sewage disposal in the built-up sections of the town or act 
anything thereon. 



Article 35. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $1000.00 or 
any other sum for the purchase and erection of a fence to 
separate the Goward Field playground from the highway de- 
partment or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. Hereof 
fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your do- 
ings thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the time of 
meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands at Acton this ninth day of Jan- 
uary, 1946. 

GEORGE S. BRAMAN, 
ARTHUR W. EEE, 
LAWRENCE DONNELLY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

A true copy.. Attest: 

Robert G. Willett, 

Constable of Acton. 



10 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Moderator 

Albert P. Durkee 



» 



.Selectmen 

George S. Braman Term expires 1946 

Lawrence Donnelly Term expires 1947 

Arthur W. Lee Term expires 1948 

Town Clerk 

Harlan E. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

William Henry Soar 

Assessors 

Carl C. Flint Term expires 1946 

Albert P. Durkee Term expires 1947 

James W. Baker Term expires 1948 

Collector of Taxes 

Carrie M. Durkee 

Tree Warden 

James J. Knight 

Board of Public Welfare 

Mary M. Laffin Term expires 1946 

Water B. Stevens Term expires 1947 

Benjamin J. Ineson Term expires 1948 

Constables 

Ivar Peterson Robert G. Willett 

Michael Foley Samuel E. Knowlton 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Harry E. Holt Term expires 1947 

Ray L. Harris Term expires 1948 



11 

School Committee 

Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Marion C. Reed - Term expires 1946 

Edith T. Engman Term expires 1947 

Margaret Eraser Term expires 1947 

Hermann H. Gatchell Term expires 1948 

Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1948 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

Horace E. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Wendell E. Davis Term expires 1947 

Mary Haskell Lothrop Term expires 1948 

Board of Health 

0. Lawrence Clark Term expires 1946 

Robert R. Eord Term expires 1947 

Lowell H. Cram Term expires 1948 

Agent of Board of Health 

Ernest E. Allsopp 

Trustees of Elizabeth White Fund 

Grace 0. Lears Term expires 1946 

Clara L. Sawyer Term expires 1947 

Waldo E. Whitcomb Term expires 1948 

Trustees of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1946 

Arnold H. Perkins Term expires 1947 

H. Stuart MacGregor Term expires 1948 

Trustees of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

Herbert Merriam Term expires 1946 

Frederick T. Kennedy Term expires 1947 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1948 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1946 

Charles E. Smith Term expires 1947 

Ralph P. Marble Term expires 1948 



12 
APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN— 1945 



Executive Clerk 

Virginia Milbery 

Office: Town Hall Hours: 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Meetings: Board of Selectmen, Wednesday evenings at 7:30 

Board of Public Welfare, Monday evenings at 7:00 

Finance Committee 

W. Stuart Allen Pauline Bursaw 

Alden C. Flagg Albert W. Locke 

William T. Merriam Porter G. Jenks 

Superintendent of Streets 

Russell C. Berry 

Town Accountant 

Howard L. Jones Term expires 1947 

Registrars of Voters 

James W. Coughlin Term expires 1946 

James B. Wilson Term expires 1947 

William B. Feely Term expires 1948 

Harlan E. Tuttle Ex-Officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct I 
Warden — Alice C. Duren 
Clerk — James A. Wayne 
Inspector — Samuel E. Knowlton 
Inspector — Paul A. Coughlin 
Deputy Warden — Gertrude M. O'Neil 
Deputy Clerk— Helen R. Best 
Deputy Inspector — Ralph L. Rogers 
Deputy Inspector — Leo T. McCarthy 
Teller — Marion C. Jewell 
Teller— Mary F. McCarthy 

Precinct II 
Warden — Doris Soar 



13 

Clerk — Grace J. Cullinane 
Inspector — Merle M. Hayward 
Inspector — Sophia Walsh 
Deputy Warden — Marion H. Wilmot 
Deputy Clerk — Thomas M. Murray 
Deputy Inspector — Henry L. Capelle 
Deputy Inspector — Joseph H. Lemoine 
Teller — Marion L. Piper 
Teller — Margaret Coughlin 

Precinct III 
Warden^-Fannie E. Davis 
Clerk — Anna M. Learmonth 
Inspector — Louise C. O'Brien 
Inspector — Mary M. Laffin 
Deputy Warden — Bertram D. Hall 
Deputy Clerk— Elizabeth M. White 
Deputy Inspector — Harry E. Holt 
Deputy Inspector — Katherine M. Kinsley 
Teller — Margaret F. Leveroni 
Teller— Marion C. Reed 

Fire Engineers 

H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Engineer 

Clarence Frost, Asst. Engineer — Precinct I 

David Clayton, Asst. Engineer — Precinct II 

Arno H. Perkins, Asst. Engineer — Precinct III 

Cattle Inspector 

Ernest E. Allsopp . 

Forest Warden 
H. Stuart MacGregor 

Dog Officer 

Arthur Eraser 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Carl E. Anderson 

Town Forest Committee 

Arno H. Perkins Term expires 1946 



14 

Clarence Frost Term expires 1947 

James J. Knight Term expires 1948 

Surveyors of Wood and Lumber 

Oliver D. Wood Charles E. Smith 

Fence Viewers 

Robert G. Willett Edward W. Estabrook 

Louis F. Leveroni 

Field Drivers 

Norman E. Liverm6re Benjamin H. Sawyer 

Benjamin E. Derby 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James J. Knight 

Police Officers 

*Michael Foley, Chief 

Robert G. Willett Benjamin H. Sawyer 

Louis F. Leveroni * Samuel' E. Knowlton 

* Civil Service — Permanent 

Burial Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Soldiers' Relief Agent 

Waldo J. Flint 

Superintendent of Jones Memorial Field 

Russell C. Berry 

Superintendent of Goward Field 

Russell C. Berry 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 

Howard L. Jones 

Public Weighers 

William Braman Albert S. Braman 

G. Howard Reed Philip Newell 

A. W. Davis Thomas Hearon 

John William Davis Albert R. Jenks 

Alfred Davis, Jr. Porter G. Jenks 

M. B. Ferber Louise Garceau 

Willard Houghton L. W. Lowe 

Otis J. Reed 



15 
TOWN MEETINGS 



i 



Abstract of the Preceedings of the Annual Town Meeting, 

March 12, 1945 

Art. 1. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries of all town officers. 

Chose: Waldo E. Whitcomb trustee of the Elizabeth 
White Fund for three years. 

Chose: H. Stuart MacGregor trustee of the West Ac- 
ton Firemen's Relief Fund for Three years. 

Chose: Clarence Frost trustee of the Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund for three years. 

Chose: Ralph P. Marble trustee of the Goodnow Fund 
for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the Tax Collector be twelve 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Select- 
men be three hundred dollars per annum and the other mem- 
bers two hundred dollars each per annum. 

Voted: That the salaries of the Assessors be fifteen 
hundred dollars in the aggregate per annum to be appor- 
tioned as they may determine. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairmann of the 
Board of Health be twenty-five dollars per annum, tne clerk 
fifteen dollars and the other member ten dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the Board 
of Public Welfare be one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per annum and that of the other members seventy-five dol- 
lars each per annum and that a member of the Board of 
Public Welfare shall serve as Supervisor of Old Age Assist- 
ance and that the expense of administering this assistance 
such as necessary supplies, salary and traveling expense of 



16 

said supervisor shall not exceed the amount provided for this 
purpose by the Federal Government. 

Voted: That the salary of the Moderator be fifteen 
dollars for the annual meeting and ten dollars for the special 
meetings. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Clerk be three 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Treasurer be six 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the Town Accountant be 
six hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to fix the 
salaries of all other town officers. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to accept the sev- 
eral reports of the town officers. 

Voted : To accept the several reports of town officers. 

* Art. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen at any previous meeting that have not already 
reported. 

The committee appointed in 1941 to assign numbers to 
buildings and dwellings in the town reported their work 
completed. 

Voted: To accept the report with thanks and dis- 
charge the committee. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $250.00 or some other sum for the ob- 
servance of Memorial Day, this sum to be expended under 
the direction of a committee appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of ($250.00) 
two hundred and fifty dollars for the observance of Mem- 



17 

orial Day, this sum to be expended under the direction of a 
committee appointed by the Board of Selectmen. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning January 1, 1945, and to is- 
sue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Voted unanimously: To authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1945, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a perod of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $250.00 for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The amount 
spent for board and disposal of dogs will be reimbursed \>y 
the County of Middlesex, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of Two Hun- 
dred and Fifty (250) dollars for the use of the Treasurer, 
to pay the expenses of the local Dog Officer. The amount 
spent for board and disposal of dogs will be reimbursed by 
the County of Middlesex. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to transfer S875.00 
from the Machinery Fund to the Machinery Account, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To transfer Eight hundred and seventy-five 
dollars ($875.00) from the Machinery Fund to the Machin- 
ery Account. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $500.00 or any other sum to be used by 



18 

the Town Forest Committee for the purpose of purchasing 
additional forest land or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of Five Hun. 
dred (500) dollars to be used by the Town Forest Commit- 
tee for the purpose of purchasing additional forest land. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $500.00 or any other sum from the Surplus 
Revenue Account for 'the work of the Post- War PubHc 
Works Committee, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of Five Hundred (500) 
dollars from the Surplus Revenue Account for the work of 
the Post-War Public Works Committee. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $550.00 for repairs on the town roller, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of Five Hun« 
dred and Fifty (550) dollars for repairs on the town roller. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of |1000.00 for repairs to the buildings 
now used by the Highway Department, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of One Thous- 
and (1000) dollars for repairs to the buildings now used by 

the Highway Department. 

« 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $100.00 to defray the necessary ex- 
penses of office supplies, etc., in connection with the admin- 
istration of Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children 
and General Relief, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of One Hun- 
dred (100) dollars to defray the necessary expenses of office 
supplies, etc., in connection with the administration of Old 
Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children and General 
Relief. 



19 

Art. 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of SIOOO.OO to purchase new hose and 
three (3) fire alarm boxes, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of One 
Thousand (1000) dollars to purchase new hose and three (3) 
lire alarm boxes and install the same. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to approve bills to the amount of 
$1,500.00 for the furnishing and installing of fluorescent 
lights in some rooms of the elementary schools, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to ap- 
prove bills to the amount of Fifteen Hundred (1500) dol- 
lars for the furnishing and installing of fluorescent lights 
in some rooms of the elementary schools and that said board 
shall not approve for payment the bills until said installations 
are approved by the state wiring inspector. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $77.80 to pay the balance due on the installation 
of fluorescent lighting in the elementary schools. 

Motion: That the vote be taken by ballot did not pre- 
vail. 

Voted: By a standing — Yes, 148, No 18 — to raise 
and approprate the sum of Seventy-Seven dollars and Eighty 
Cents ($77.80) to pay the balance due on the installation of 
fluorescent lighting in the elementary schools and that the 
Board of Selectmen shall not approve for payment said bal- 
ance due until said installations are approved by the state 
wiring inspector. (Tellers for above vote — Everett Put- 
nam, Porter Jenks, Howard Billings and James W. Baker). 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the additonal sum of $1550.00 to complete the 
fluorescent lighting in all elementary classrooms, or act 
anything thereon. 



20 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the additional sum 
of Fifteen Hundred and Fifty (1550) dollars to complete the 
fluorescent lighting in all elementary classrooms. 

Art. 17. To see what sum of money the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary and usual 
expenses of the several departments of the town and deter- 
mine how the same shall be raised. 

Voted: That the following sums of money be raised 
and appropriated for several specific purposes hereinafter 
designated and that the same be expended only for the pur- 
poses under the direction of the respective boards, commit- 
tees, or officers of the town, as follows: 

Moderator $ 25. 

Finance or Advisory Committee Ex- 
penses 200. 

Selectmen,. Salaries & Wages 1,800. 

Expenses * 100. 

Town Accountant, Salaries & Wages 650. 

Expenses 40. 

Treasurer, Salaries & Wages 650. 

Expenses 200. 

Collector, Salaries & Wages 1,250. 

Expenses 200. 

Assessors, Salaries & Wages 1,500. 

Expenses 75. 

Town Clerk, Salaries & Wages 350. 

Expenses 150. 

Elections & Registration 

Salaries & Wages 550. 

Expenses 300. 

Buildings & Grounds 

Salaries & Wages 900. 

Expenses 2.800. 



Total Buildings & Grounds 3,700. 

Protection of Persons & Property 
Police 

Chief's Salary 1,800. 



I 



21 

Chiefs War Bonus . 300. 

Special Officers 400. 

Expences including 

Cruiser 850. 

Fire Department 

Salaries & Wages 1,900. 

Expenses 1,100. 

Fire Hydrants (Rental) 3,453. 

Forest Fires 1,200. 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries & Wages 200. 

Expenses 15. 

Moth Dept., Salaries & Wages 700. 

Expenses 800. 

Tree Warden, Salaries & Wages 700, 

Expenses 300. 

Health & Sanitation 

Health, Salaries & Wages 3.650. 

Expenses 400. 

Inspection of Animals 125. 

Highways 

Salaries & Wages 900.- 

Expenses 550. 

Chapter 81 7,125. 

Chapter 90 2,500. 

Snow Removal & Maintenance 

of Equipment 10,000. 

Street Lighting 3,525. 



General Relief 

Salaries & Wages 625. 

Expenses 4,000. 

Old Age Assistance, Expenses 20,000. 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,000. 



Veterans Benefits 

Salaries & Wages 50. 

Expenses 1,000. 



13,718. 



4,175. 



24,600. 



26,625. 



1.050. 



22 

Education : 

Supt., Principals' & Teachers' 

Salaries & Janitor Wages 50,020. 

Fuel 2,180. 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 

Fund 217.50 

General & Miscellaneous Expense 

Supplies, including new text 

books 5,100. 

Transportation. 5,000. 

Vocational Education 100. 

Janitors' Supplies & Power 1,400. 

General Repairs & Outlays 1,950. 

Waterproofing North Wall High 

School 1,600. 

Libraries 

Salaries & Wages 700. 

Expenses 800. 

Books 200. 



Recreation 

Playgrounds 200. 

Miscellaneous Expenses 500. 

Town Reports 400. 

Workmen's Compensation 600. 

Committee on Public Safety 400. 

Surety Bonds 280. 

Rationing Board 1,300. 



69,267.50 



$151,175.50 



3,680. 



Cemeteries 

Salaries & Wages 2,400. 

Expenses 400. 2,800. 

Maturing Debt 3,000. 

Interest, Maturing Debt 250.75 3,250.75 



160,906.25 



Special Articles: raise and appropriate 

Art. 6— Dog Officer 250. 

8— Town Forest 500. 



» 



23 

10_Town Roller 550. 

11 — Highway Dept. Repairs 

on bldgs 1,000. 

12— Board of Public Welfare 100. 

13— Fire Department 1,000. 

16 — Fluorescent lights 1,550. 

19— Board of Health (Gar- 
bage) 1,800. 

20— Tree Dept. (Replace- 
ment) 250. 

21 — Power Traction with at- 
tachments 600. 

22 — Compressor — Cemeteries 400. 8,000.- 

4— Memorial Day 250. 250. 

15— Fluorescent lighting 77.80 77.80: 



Total voted to be raised and ap- 
propriated 1169,234.05. 

Transfers : 
Art. 7 — Machinery Fund to Ma- 
chinery Account 875. 

9 — Surplus Revenue Ac- 
count to Post War Com- 
mittee 500. 

32 — Overlay Surplus to Re- 
serve Fund 2,500. 

33 — Surplus Revenue Ac- 
count on account of 
State and County allot- 
ments for Highways 10,725. 14,600. 



$183,834.05, 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to have an annual audit of the various 
accounts of the town or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To instruct the Board of Selectmen to have' 
an annual audit of the various accounts of the town. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $1800.00 so that the Board of Healtk 



24 

may contract for the collection and disposal of garbage for 
the period of one year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of Eighteen 
Hundred (1800) dollars so that the Board of Health may 
contract for the collection and disposal of garbage for the 
period of one year. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $250.00 for the Tree Department for 
the replacement of shade trees, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of Two Hun- 
tired and Fifty (250) dollars for the tree department, for 
the replacement of shade trees. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $600.00 for the purchase of a power 
tractor and attachments for the Highway Department, or 
act anything there. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of Six Hun- 
dred (600) dollars for the purchase of a power tractor and 
attachments for the Highway Department. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $400.00 for a compressor for the Ceme- 
tery Department, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of Four Hun- 
dred (400) dollars for a compressor for the Cemetery De- 
partment. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
Honor Roll which was presented to the citizens of the Town 
of Acton on November 28, 1943, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To accept the Honor Roll which was presented 
hy the citzens of the Town of Acton on November 28, 1943. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to accept the gift 
of $1500.00 made to the Town of Acton by the will of the 
late Miss Charlotte B. Conant. Said sum to be kept as a 



25 

fund and the income thereof used for the purchase of new 
books for the High School Library to be selected by the 
principal and the heads of the Enghsh and History Depart- 
ments of the High School, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To accept the gift of Fifteen Hundred (1500) 
dollars made to the Town of Acton by the will of the late 
Miss Charlotte B. Conant. Said sum to be kept as a fund 
and the income thereof used for the purchase of new books 
for the High School Library to be selected by the principal 
and the heads of the English and History Departments of 
the High School. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will accept as a town way 
or street, that road known as Pine Street, westerly about 
250 feet off Main Street, as shown on a plan filed in the office 
of the town clerk, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of three to report at 
the next annual or special town meeting regarding the ad- 
visability of purchasing a truck for the Highway Depart- 
ment, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To instruct the Moderator to appoint a commit- 
tee of three to report at the next annual or special town 
meeting regarding the advisability of purchasing a truck for 
the Highway Department. Committee: Edward J. Bursaw^ 
Frank B. Roche, and G. Howard Reed. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of five to be known as 
the Acton War Record Committee, whose duty it shall be 
to compile a permanent record of all men and women of 
Acton in the military service of the United States or of 
any of its Allies in the present World War. This committee 
to have full power of filling vacancies or enlarging the mem- 
bership of the committee and that such moneys for the use 
of the committee as the Selectmen deem necessary from 
time to time be made available to the committee by the 



26 

Selectmen or the Finance Committee from any funds within 
their control. This committee to report at the next annual 
town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To instruct the Moderator to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to be known as the Acton War Record Com- 
mittee, whose duty it shall be to compile a permanent record 
of all men and women of Acton in the military service of 
the United States or of any of its Allies in the present 
World War. This committee to have full power of filling 
vacancies or enlarging the membership of the committee and 
that such moneys for the use of the committee as the Select- 
men deem necessary from time to time be made available to 
the committee by the Selectmen or the Finance Committee 
from any funds within their control. This committee to re- 
port at the next annual town meeting. Committee. Ralph 
P. Marble, Herbert L. Leusher, Theron A. Lowden, Prentice 
W. Blood, and Mrs. Marjorie J. Davis. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to insti*uct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of five to investigate and 
submit a set of Zoning Laws at the next annual or a special 
town meetng, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To instruct the Moderator to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to investigate and submit a set of Zoning Laws 
at the next annual or a special town meeting. Committee: 
Maynard L. Harris, Clare A. Milbery, Charles J. Farley, 
Porter Jenks, and James H. Connolly. 

Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of five to investigate and 
submit a set of Building Laws at the next annual or a special 
.town meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To instruct the Moderator to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to investigate and submit a set of Building 
Laws at the next annual or a special town meeting and that 
the committee appointed to act on Article 28 be the commit- 
tee to act on Article 29. 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to elect by the 



27 

town meeting a school Building Committee of three, working 
with the School Committee and the Superintendent, to sur- 
vey the elementary school needs of the town, secure plans, 
and discover the cost of a central 8-grade elementarj^ school^ 
including sub-primary department, and the cost of three 
new 8-grade elementary schools, including sub-primary de- 
partment, one in each precinct; and to see if the town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the 
use of the School Building Committee, and instruct it to 
report to the town at the next annual or a special town 
meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To lay the article on the table until some future 
date. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Moderator to appoint a committee of three to investigate and 
recommend the advisabihty of insuring all or any part of the 
town buildings or equipment and report at the next annual or 
a special tow^n meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of S2500.00 from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve 
Fund, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of Twenty-Five Hun- 
dred (2500) dollars from the Overlay Surplus as a Reserve 
Fund. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will appropriate from the 
Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the State's and 
County's allotments for Highways under Chapters 81 and 
90, provided that the reimbursement from the State and 
County be credited back to the Surplus Revenue account or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate from the Surplus Revenue Ac- 
count the sum of Ten Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-Five 
(10,725) dollars the amount of the State's and County's allot- 
ments for Highways under chapters 81 and 90, provided that 
the reimbursement from the State and County be credited 
back to the Surplus Revenue Account. • 

Voted: To adjourn. 



28 ^ 

TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

BIRTHS 

Whole number recorded 47 

Born in ^cton 1 Mixed Parentage 5 

Males ... 31 Native Parentage ... 41 

Females 16 Foreign Parentage .... 1 

MARRIAGES 

Whole number recorded 38 

Resident of Acton .... 42 Resident of other places 34 

DEATHS 

WTiole number recorded 33 

Resident of Acton .... 27 Resident of other places 6 

Occurring in Acton 25 Occurring in other places 8 

Average age in years, 67 plus 



DOG LICENSES 

308 Licenses at |2.00 §616.00 

57 Licenses at $5.00 285.00 

1 License at $50.00 50.00 

1 License at $25.00 25.00 

2 Licenses at $10.00 20.00 

20 Free Military Licenses 

$996.00 
Deduct fees 369 Licenses at 20 cents . . . 73.80 



Paid to Town Treasurer $922.20 

NOTICE 

All licenses expire March 31. 

Dogs must be licensed on or before April 1, or the own 
ers or keepers thereof are liable to a fine. 

The law applies to all dogs three months old or over, 
regardless of the time of year ownership is acquired. No 
tax bills are sent to owners of dogs. 

HARLAN E. TXJTTLE 

Town Clerk 



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35 



Date 



Deaths Registered in 1945 
Name 



M. D. 



Nov. 13 

April 3 

Sept. 5 

June 29 

May 6 

July 28 

April 23 

Oct. 25 

Oct. 24 

Oct. 15 

Aug. 20 

Nov. 12 

July 22 

June 11 

Jan. 27 
March 6 

Sept. 10 

Jan. 25 

Oct. 1 

Jan. 15 

Aug. '29 

Aug. 25 

April 8 

Oct. 14 

Feb. 20 

Jan. 11 

"Feb. 19 

Aug. 10 

Sept. 22 

April 18 

Oct. 6 

Dec. 7 

Nov. 3 



Balduf, George J. 


66 


8 


6 


Ballou, Bertha S. (Carney) 


42 


7 


3 


Caia, Corridina 


86 








Conant, Edward F. 


88 


1 


16 


Chapman, Herbert F. 


65 


5 


27 


Dickey, Bertrand E. 


58 


4 


29 


Edwardsen, Andrew 


78 


3 


11 


Enneguess, Mary 


83 








French, Walter M. 


93 


1 


25 


Hart, Nelson N. 


71 








Hewitt, Gertrude E. 


65 


2 


13 


Jones, Lawrence W. 


56 


10 


18 


Kinchla, Barbara L. 


30 


9 


28 


Kirk, John 


77 


7 


1 


Lawrence, William G. 


63 


4 


12 


Lunt, Hattie V. (Stearns) 


77 


5 


25 


Maguire, E. Monica (Roche) 


• 58 


5 


2 


Maillain, Mary E. 


91 


9 





Mandell, Winthrop P. 


52 


3 


28 


Merriam, Nellie S. (Whitney) 


78 


11 


14 


Mott, Louella 


85 


9 


11 


Piper, Ellen L. 


90 


9 


27 


Quimby, Emma L. (Billings) 


85 


6 


25 


Reed, Ellen A. (McDaniels) 


92 


6 


14 


Smith, Euphemia 


89 


11 


9 


Starbuck, Amanda V. 


84 





13 


Starch, Ludvig 


73 


8 


30 


Story, Arthur W- 


70 


6 


5 


Taylor, Charles P. 


29 


1 


4 


Tenney, Nelson H. 


92 


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38 
JURY LIST REVISED — 1945 

Precinct I 

Arthur Freese — 40 Wetherbee St. 
Roy H. Linscott— 343 Great Rd. 
Elwin H. Hollowell — 13 Wheeler Lane 
Herbert L. Leusher — 84 Woodlawn Lane 
Foster R. MacKinnon— 73 Esterbrook Rd. 
Orson K. Miller— 92 Nagog Hill Rd. 
Fred V. Richards — 11 Hosmer St. 
E. Clayton Steeves— 49 Taylor Rd. 
J. Henry Engman — 54 Great Rd. 
Roland 0. Livermore — 505 Main St. 

Precinct II 

Edward LeClerc— 47 School St. 
David F. Penney— 81 Robbins St. 
Harold C. White— 38 Main St. 
Chester A. Spinney— 103 Main St. 
Lossie E. Laird — 2 Fletcher Ct. 
Harold G. Nicola— 86 Concord St. 
Albert S. Braman — 13 Chadwick St. 
Hugh C. Hodgen— 66 Liberty St. 
Karl R. Jones— 154 Main St. 
Theron A. Lowden— 172 Main St. 

Precinct III 

Bertram D. Hall— 39 Windsor Ave. 
George A. Rifford— 186 Central St. 
Edward A. Schmitz — 57 Windsor Ave. 
Joseph F. Redfern— 220 Central St. 
Harry E. Fannon— 249 Central St. 
R. Almont Lawton — 235 Central St. 
Carl E. Anderson — 580 Massachusetts Ave 
George Roe — 280 Arlington St. 
James E. Kinsley — 265 Central St. 
Raymond A. Gallant— 244 Central St. 



39 

SELECTMEN'S REPORT 

We submit, herewith, the reports of the various departments' 
of the Town for the year ending December 31, 1945, after the 
actions under the different articles voted at the last Annual 
Town Meeting. 

The Public Works and County Commissioners notified us 
that funds will be available for new construction under Chapter 
90; the Town appropriates one-fourth, the County one-fourth, 
and the State one-half. This is the first money since 1941 that 
has been alloted by the State and County for new work. We 
recommend that the Town resume the rebuilding of North Main 
Street from the Carlisle hne to the Great Road, "Route 112.'' 

The repairs have been made on the Roller and it should be 
serviceable for a few more years. Some equipment voted under 
Special Articles have been ordered and accepted but have not been 
delivered as yet, on account of the slow up of reconversion. 

The building purchased for the Highway Department have 
been reroofed and doors installed to house the equipment. The 
sum of $2012.46 was turned over to the Town Treasurer by the 
Stockholders of the Acton Agricultural Holding Company. Bids 
were posted for the painting of the West Action Fire House as no 
bids were received this project will be up for consideration at the 
next Annual Town Meeting. 

Under Chapter 690 on January 1, 1946, the care, control and 
maintenance of every public highway bridge with a clear span 
of not less than 20 feet, located on a through route was trans- 
ferred to the State Department of Public Works and the cost 
thereof shall be paid out of the Highway Fund; one bridge on 
route 62 and two bridges on route 27 "The Railroad bridge and 
the Stone arch bridge at Faulkner Mills, South Acton" were the 
' three bridges transferred to the Department of Public Works. 

The Board wishes, at this time, to express its appreciation to 
all town officers and committees for their support and co-opera- 
tion in carrying out the duties of their respective offices during 
the past year. 

GEORGE S. BRAMAN 
ARTHUR W. LEE 
LAWRENCE DONNELLY 

Selectmen of Acton. 



40 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton: 

I herewith submit my report, concerning the work of the 
Highway Department for the year of 1945. 

The regular maintenance and work of cleaning and patching 
was carried on. Extensive brush cutting was done. 

Ten miles of road received surface treatment which included 
two miles of mixed in place. 

Concrete posts and guard rails were erected at Homestead 
and Willow Streets. 

' Guard rail posts were set on Hosmer Street at Coles Brook 
for a distance of 230 fee£. 

The work on Concord Road at Ice Pond, started in the fall 
of 1944, was completed. Walls were built, extending and 
strengthening the culverts. Gravel was put on the s-houlders, 
thus widening the road. Concrete posts and guard rails were 
erected on both sides of the causeway. The road was gi;aded and 
surfaced. This project relieved a very dangerous situation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUSSELL C. BERRY, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I am pleased to state that there were no accidents reported 
to me during the year ended December 31, 1945. 

HOWARD L. JONES 

Compensation Agent. 



41 
FOREST WARDEN'S REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Your Forest Warden submits the following report for the year 

ending December 31, 1945: 

Total number of brush and grass fires responded to 35 

This has been an exceptionally light year for brush fires, and 

it was not necessavy to put on a forest fire patrol. 

The equipment is in good condition, but I would like to rec- 
ommend purchasing a new forest fire truck this year to replace 
the old one. I feel that the tax payers living outside the water 
district deserve -and should have the best protection we can possi- 
bly give them. The proposed new truck will carry 500 gallons of 
water, a pump and other modern equipment which we do not 
have on the present truck. 

This truck has more territory to cover than all the other 
trucks together and most of this territory is in the rural district 
with no hydrant service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Forest Warden, 



REPORT OF DOG OFFICER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herevrith submit my report for the year 1945. 

Number of dogs disposed of in accordance with law 42 

Number of dogs reclaimed by owners in accordance with law 10 

Number of calls answered for dog nuisance 93 

Warnings to delinquent owners to get licenses 103 

Appropriation $250.00 

42 dogs at $3.00 for six days 126.00 

42 dogs disposed of 42.00 

Gentlemen: 

I recommend tlie appropriation for the year 1946 be $250.00. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR FRASER, 

Dof Officer. 



42 
REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1945. 

An appropriation of $1000 was made for this work last year. 
This money was for emergency work such as removing dead, 
broken and dangerous trees. Seven hundred dollars was used 
for wages and $300 for expenses. 

The trees are in very bad condition and should be taken care 
of this coming year. 

An appropriation of $250 was made for the replacement of 
shade trees. The expense was about $166 and the balance was 
used for labor. We need a number of trees replaced this coming 
year. 

I, therefore, recommend that an appropriation of $1000 be 
made for the care of shade trees in 1946. Under a special article 
I recommend that an appropriation of $250 be made for the 
replacement of shade trees throughout the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Tree Warden. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is the report of your Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the year 1945. 

I examined 342 weighing and measuring devices, sealing 340, 
and 2 not being in use were not sealed. 

Fees collected $65.42. 

The Bureau of Standards loaned equipment for measuring 
gas and oil tank trucks. This was a great accommodation to the 
dealers saving them the time and expense of going to Lowell or 
Waltham. 

Our merchants were very co-operative and their equipment 
in good order. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. ANDERSON, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



43 
REPORT OF MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 



I hereby submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1945. 

An appropriation of $1500 was made for the moth work last 
year. The cost of spraying material and running expense of a 
sprayer and truck w^s about $800. This money was used for 
spraying through the town once for pest control, and a second 
spray for pest control and elm. leaf beetle through part of the 
town. 

I, therefore, recommend that an appropriation of $1500 be 
made for the suppression of gypsy moth and elm leaf beetle and 
for other work that should be done. 

In regard to the truck for the town sprayer — it needs a new 
clutch and quite a few other repairs. I do not think the clutch 
can be obtained as the truck is an old model, 1924 Reo. The 
truck is not heavy enough and therefore not safe with the loads 
it has to carry. It is a question whether we can get it registered 
this year as it will not stand the test. 

Therefore,I recommend a different truck which is heavier 
and has dual wheels. 



Re'spectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. KNIGHT, 

Moth Superintendent. 



44 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 

Accessions — Number of volumes in Library January 1, 1045, 
21,916. Increase by purchase, 261. Increase by gift, 604. Total 
increase, 865. Withdrawn from circulation, 977. Total number 
of volumes in Library, January 1, 1946, 21,804. 

Circulation — Number of days Library was opened, 102 days. 
Number of volumes circulated, 9,282. 
Largest daily circulation, 304, December 8. 
Smallest daily circulation, 13, December 19. 
Daily average circulation, 91. ^ 

Received from fines, sale of magazines and books and 
miscellaneous, $125.62. 

In addition to these statistics, I wish to record that the hours 
have been changed so that the Library is now open on Wednes- 
days and Saturdays from 2-6 and from 7-9:30. We hope this 
will be more helpful to the public than the former hours. 

With the approval of the Trustees, I have organized State 
Certificate Reading for the pupils of Grades 4, 5, and 6. They 
seem to enjoy it and I hope the experience will help them when 
they begin to work on Book Reports at High School. 

Over a year ago, it was decided that, inasmuch as the Library 
is a Town organization, and because it supports the South and 
West Branches, it was only fair to distribute new reading mate- 
rial as evenly as possible over the town. So that now, a third of 
each purchase stays at the Center, a third goes to West Acton 
and a third to South Acton. These Branch books remain six 
months, then reverse positions for another six months and then 
return to the Center. 

In the matter of fines, I have made no change, following the 
original rules of 1890. I have enforced these quite strictly for 
three reasons. The first is that it is my duty as a Town official. 
The second is that a rule is made to be kept and not broken ; and 
the third is that I feel it to be a very good way to train children 
as they begin community life, in promptness, in a sense of respon- 
sibility and in principle in financial dealings. I gather that the 
original purpose of imposing fines was not to punish the public, 
but to hasten the return of books in order that others might enjoy 
them. This also increases the circulation, whereby we get a 
better rating with the State. 



45 

The matter of reserving books has been taken up by the 
Trustees and judged not to be advisable in a Library which is 
not open daily. 

As for circulation, you will note that during the past year, 
we have put out 1863 more books than in 1944 and 1127 more than 
in 1943. 

An appeal came for books for Russia to help replace those 
destroyed by the Germans. I collected 87, nearly all from Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter C. White and Capt. Walter C. White, Jr. to 
whom we give thanks. Also our gratitude goes to the John Peder- 
son Trucking Company for transporting these books to Boston 
free of charge. 

Mrs-. Ralph Piper and Miss Jennie Reed have helped me in 
lifting and bundling books to be taken to Fort Devens or to be 
sold to Mr. Rubin, and I acknowledge their help with gratitude. 
The Branch Librarians in West and South Acton have never 
failed in their loyalty and co-operation and we are all indebted 
to them for their able assistance. 

MARY LOTHROP, 

Librarian. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following sources; 
we accept these donations with thanks: Westinghouse Company, 
1; Janet Gould, 2; Mildred Pope Moore, 77; State of Massachu- 
setts, 5; Anne Rimbach, 1; Ruth Ann Tobin, 1; Laura Forbes, 6; 
E. H. Washburn, 1; R. W. Robbing, 3; The Insurance Company of 
North America, 1; Junior Literary Guild, 4; Fred Kiley, 1; C. 
Douglas, 6; Capt. Walter C. White, Jr., 3; The Chrysler Corpora- 
tion, 1; Stuart Allen, 420; Howard J. Billings, 1; Mrs. Maynard 
Harris, 18; Warren Hutchinson, 34; Mrs. Henry Hopkinson, 1; 
Mrs. Walter C. White, 1; Mrs. Burton Harvey, 3; Anonymous, 
13. Total, 604. 



46 



Aldrich, B. S. 
Aldridge, J. 
Almedingen, E. M. 

Ashton, H. 
Bailey, T. 
Barber, W. A. 

and Schabelitz, R. F. 
Barrett, M. 
Bassett, S. W. 
Bauer, F. M. 
Bayer, 0. W. 
Blackmore, R. D. 
Boyle, K. 
Bramhall, M. 
Brand, M. 
Branson, H. C. 
Brink, C. 
Bromfield, L. 
Bronte, C. 
-Bruff, N. 
Buck, P. 
Burke, F. R. 
Burman, B. L. 
Burt, S. 

Campbell, H. R. 
Carfrae, E. 
Childers, J. S. 
Christie, A. 

Clark, W. T. 
Cleaton, I. 
Cochran, H. 
Cohen, 0. R. 
Cole, J. 
Coles, M. 
Corbett, E. 
Costain, T. 
Crane, F. 

Cunningham, A. B. 
Dean, A. 



FICTION 

The Cutters 

The Sea Eagle 

Dasha 

Frossia 

Joanna 

Red Fruit 

Drawn Conclusion 

Murder at Belle Camille 

Silver Moon Cottage 

Behold Your King 

An Eye for an Eye 

Lorna Doone 

Primer for Combat 

Button, Button 

Silvertip's Search 

Case of the Giant Killer 

Buffalo Coat 

What Became of Anna Bolton 

Jane Eyre 

The Manatee 

Portrait of a Marriage 

The Frightened Pigeon 

Rooster Crows for Day 

Along These Streets 

Magic Makes Murder 

Tomorrow Sometimes Comes 

Hilltop in the Rain 

Death Comes as the End 

Towards Zero 

The Ox-Bow Incident 

The Outsider 

Silver Shoals 

Day in Paradise 

The Frontier Legion 

Green Hazard 

The Red Haired Lady 

The Black Rose 

The Indigo Necklace 

Murder Before Midnight 

Dead Man's Float . 



47 



Deeping, W. 
Disney, D. C. 
Downes, A. M. 
Eberhart, m/g. 
Ermine, W. 
Faulkner, W. 
Fenisong, R. 
Ferber, E. 
Field, P. 

Foley, M., Ed. 

Fontaine, R. 
Forbes, K. 
Forester, C. S. 

Frank, B. 
Franken, R. 
Gardner, E. S. 



Gibbs 

Gilbert, A. 

Glasgow, E. 
Gordon, C. 
Gould, C. 
Govan, C. N. 
Graham, G. 
Graves, R. 
Gregory, J. 
Gruber, F. 
Gunther, J. 
Halliday, B. 
Hanlin, T. 
Hard, M. 
Heberdeen, M. V. 
Hemingway, E. 
Hewlett, M. 
Heyer, G. 



Slade 

The 17th Letter 

Heartwood 

Wings of Fear 

Buckskin Marshall 

Go Down, Moses 

Jenny Kissed Me 

Great Son 

Death Rides the Night 

The Road to Laramie 

Best American Short Stories 

1943 
The Happy Times 
Mamma's Bank Account 
Commodore Hornblower 
Rifleman Dodd and the Gun 
The Days of the King 
Another Claudia 
The Case of the Gold-digger's 

Purse 
The Case of the Half-wakened 

Wife 
The Battle Within 
The Interpreter 
The Scarlet Button 
The Woman in Bed 
The Miller of Old Church 
The Women on the Porch 
Dick Tracy, Ace Detective 
Jennifer's House 
Earth and High Heaven 
Wife to Mr. Milton 
The Hermit of Thunder King 
The Silver Tombstone 
The Troubled Midnight 
Murder is my Business 
Once in Every Lifetime 
This is Kate 
Murder Goes Astray 
For Whom the Bell Tolls 
Open Country 
Penhallow 



Heym, S. 
Hichens, R. 
Hilton, J. 
Hobart, A. T. 
Holding, E. S. 
Horan, K. 
Hugo, V. 
Hutchinson, B. 
Irwin, M. 
Janeway, E. 
Judah, C. B. 
Karig, W. 
Kent, L. A. 
Keyes, F. P. 
King, B. 
King, L. D. 
Knight, C. 
Knight, K. M. 
Landi, E. 
Langley, A. L. 
Lawrence, H. 
Lee, E. 
Lehmann, R. 
Lewis, S. 
Locke, W. J. 
Lomax, B. 
Loring, E. 
Lutz, G, L. 

Lyon, D. 
McCue, J. W. 
MacDonald, W. C. 
Maclnnes, H. 
MacLean, S. R. 
MacLennan, H. 
Maier, W. 



Of Smiling Peace 

Young Mrs. Brand 

So Well Remembered 

The Peacock Sheds His Tail 

Net of Cobwebs 

Remember the Day 

Les Miserables 

The Hollow Men 

Young Bess 

Daisy Kenyon 

Tom Bone 

Lower than Angels 

The Country Mouse 

The River Road 

The Happy Isles 

Bermuda Burial 

The Affairs of the Dead 

Stranger 
Intrigue for Empire 
The Pear Tree 
A Lion is in the Streets 
Blood upon the Snow 
The Needle's Eye 
The Ballad and the Source 
Cass Timberlane 
The Usurper 
Outlaw River 

Beyond the Sound of Guns 
By the Way of the Silver 

Thorns 
A Girl to Come Home to 
It's My Own Funeral 
Cape Cod Doctor 
Cartridge Carnival 
While Still we Live 
A Moment of Time 
Two Solitudes 
Spring Flight 



49 



Mally, E. L. 
Manning, R. 
Marsh, N. 
Marshall, B. 

Martin, A. E. 

Maugham, S. 

Michel, M. S. 

Moore, H. F. S. 

Morton, J. 

Murphy, E. F. 

McFee, W. 

Nash, A. 

Neumann, D. 

Nicholson, M. 

Nordhoff, C. and Hall, J. N. 

Morris, K. 

Ogilvie, E. 

O'Hara, M. 

Olsen, D. B. 

Ostenso, M. 

Parrish, A. 

Petersen, H. 

Phillpotts, E. 

Pick, R. 

Pinckney, J. 

Pope, E. 

Porter, A. 

Powell, R. 

Pratt, T. 

Propper, M. 

Punshon, E. R. 

Queen, E. 

Raddall, T. H. 

Rea, L. 

Rinehart, M. R. 

Roberts, C. 

Robinson, C. 

Rogers, S. 

Ross, N. W. 

Rutledge, N. 

Sabatini, R. 



The Mocking Bird is Singing 

Trigger Trail 

Died in the Wool 

The World, the Flesh and 

Father Smith 
Sinners Never Die 
The Razor's Edge 
Sweet Murder 
Death at 7.10 
Blackbirds on the Lawn 
The Scarlet Lily 
Ship to Shore 
Cabbages and Crime 
Now that April's Here 
The Port of Missing Men 
The High Barbaree 
Burned Fingers 
Storm Tide 
Thunderhead 
Cats Don't Smile 
0! River, Remember 
Poor Child 
Country Chronicle 
They Were Seven 
The Terhoven File 
Three O'Clock Dinner 
Colcorton 

Papa was a Preacher 
Lay that Pistol Down 
Miss Dilly Says No 
The Handwriting on the Wal 
The Conqueror Inn 
The Murderer is a Fox 
Roger Sudden 
Six Mrs. Greenes 
The Yelkjw Room 
The Labyrinth 
Fire-bell in the Night 
You'll be Sorry 
Take the Lightning 
Blood on the Cat 
Birth of Mischief 



50 



Sale, E. 

Sharp, M. 

Shaw, L. 

Shay, E, and Smith, K. 

Shellabarger, S. 
Sherman, R. 
Sherriff, R. C. 
Short, L. 
Shute, N. 
Simonov, K. 
Stafford, J. 
Stevens, S. S. 

Stevenson, D. E. 
Stone, I. 
Stout, R. 
Street, J. 
Swinnerton, F. 
Tarkington, B. 
Taylor, R. 
Teilhet, D. L!" 

Thane, E. 
Thirkell, A. 
Tompkins, W. A. 
Tuttle, W. C. ' 

Ullman, J. R. 
Walker, M. 
Walpole, H.- 
Wells, H. G. 
Wentworth, P. 
Westcott, G. 
Westmacott, M. 
Wickenden, D. 
Williams, B. A. 
Willock, R. 
Willoughby, B. 
Wilson, M. 
Wright, R. 
Wynne, A. 



Capt 



Recitation from Memory 
Cluny Brown 
Rickshaw Boy 
Private Adventures of 

Shaw 
Captain from Castille 

The Unready Heart 

Chedworth 

And the Wind Blows Free 

Pastoral 

Days and Nights 

Boston Adventure 

Rev Ryder and the Secret 
Wolf Canyon 

Listening Valley 

Immortal Wife 

Not Quite Dead Enough 

The Gauntlet 

A Woman in Sunshine 

Image of Josephine 

Ridin' the Rainbow 

Odd, but Even So 

Odd Man Pays 

Ever After 

The Headmistress 

Texas Tumbleweed 

Wolf Pack of Lobo Butte 

The White Tower 

Unless the Wind Turns 

Prelude to Adventure 

Joan and Peter 

She Came Back 

Apartment in Athens 

Absent in the Spring 

The Wayfarers 

Leave Her to Heaven 

5.30 to Midnight 

The Golden Totem 

The Devon Treasure Mystery 

Black Boy 

Emergency Exit 



of 



51 



Adamic, L. 
Aksakor, S. 
Baker, R. S. 
Bean, L. L. 
Berezowsk, A. 
Blanchard, A. A. 
Blanchard, H. F. 
Bodley, R. V. C. 
Bolitho, W. 

Borden, L. P. ; 

Bradbury, W. F. 
Bromfield, L. 
Brooks, vanW. 

Burt, C. B. 

Caverly, D. P. 
Cerf, B. 

Chamberlain, E. 
Chase, :\I. E. 

Clark, F. G. 

Cowles, E. S., M.D. 

Crane and Kieley 

Dallin, D. J. 

Ehrlich, L. 

Eliot, C. and Stover, F. 

Gann, E. K. 

Gatti, A. 

Gibbings, R. 

Government Printing Office 



Graham, F. 
Hahn, E. 

Hamlin, H. 

Harding, B. 

Hayes, R. 

Hibben, P. 

Hicks, Capt. James E. 

Hinshaw, D. 



A Nation of Nations 

A Russian Gentleman 

An American Chronicle 

Hunting, Fishing and Camping 

Duet with Nicky 

Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry 

Motor's Auto Repair Manual 

Wind in the Sahara 

Twelve Against the Gods 

Francesca Cabrini 

Practical Arithmetic 

Pleasant Valley 

The World of Washington 
Irving 

Proceedings of Encampment 

Dept. Mass. 1945 
A Primer of Electronics 

Try and Stop Me 
Appointment in Manila 
The Bible and the Common 

Reader 
How We Live 
Don't Be Afraid 
U. S. Naval Academy 
The Big Three 
God's Angry Man 
Manual of Inorganic Chemistry 
Island in the Sky 
South of the Sahara 
Lovely is the Lee 
Rules for Management and 
Cleaning of Rifle ]\Iusket 
Model 1863 
Descriptive Springfield Rifle 
The N. Y. Yankees 
China to Me 
The Soong Sisters 
Nine Mile Bridge 
The Lost Waltz 
Angel Mo' and her Son 
Henry Ward Beeclier 
Fire-arms 1702 



52 



Huie, W. B. 
Huxley, A. 

Jennison, K. 
Jonas, C. 
Kane, H. T. 
Karski, J. 
Korson, G. 
Lattimore, 0. 
Lauterbach, R. E. 
Lieb, F. G. 

Logan, R. W. 
McCoster, M. J. 



MacDonald, B. 
McNaughton, F. and 
Hehmeyer, W. 
Marlowe, G. F. 

Marshall, Gen. George A. 

Mason, A. T. 
Maiildin, B. 
Miller, H. W. 
Moats, A. L. 
Moore, F. J. 
Neblette, C. B. 
O'Brien, J. J. 
Orcutt, R. 
Orciitt, W. D. 
Papashvily, G. and H. 
Parker, R. 
Pearson, E. 
Pearson, H. S. 
Peattie, D. C. 

Pepper, G. W. 
Poor, H. V. 
Post, E. 



A Man from Kansas 

Can Do! A Story of the Sea 

Bees 
Perennial Philosophy 
New Hampshire 
Beachhead on the Wind 
Deep Delta Country 
Story of a Secret State 
At His Side 
Solution in Asia 
These are the Russians 
Connie Mack 
St. Louis Cardinals 
What the Negro Wants 
Historical Collection of the 

Insurance Company of 

America 
The Egg and I 

This Man Truman 
Coaching Roads of New 

England 
Report on the Winning of the 

War 
Bureaucracy Convicts Itself 
Up Front 
All Our Lives 
Blind Date with Mars 
Outlines of Organic Chemistry 
Elementary Photography 
How to Run a Lathe 
Merchant of Alphabets 
From my Library Walls 
Anything Can Happen 
Headquarters Budapest 
Studies m Murder 
Country Flavor 
Immortal Village 
Journey into America 
Philadelphia Lawyer 
An Artist Sees Alaska 
Eitquette 



53 



Pyle, E. 
Ratcliff, J. D. 
Reck, F. M. 
Robbins, R. W. 
Robeson, E. G. 
Rockwell and Grayson 
Rogers, A. 

Roth, A. 
Santayana, G. 
Sherrod, R. 
Shipton, C. K. 

Singer, K. 

Skomorovsky and Morris 
Smith, H. 
Smyth, H. D. 
Snow, E. R. 

Standish, R. 
Steinman, D. B. 
Stewart, G. R. 
Stone, Fred 
Trumbull, R. 
Wallace, L. H. 
Weidman, J. 
Welles, Sumner, Ed. 
Wentworth, G. A. 

Westinghouse Air Brake Co. 
Williams, F. 
Williams, W. 
Wolfert, I. 



Woolf, V. 
Yang, M. C. 
Yust, W., Ed. 
Yutang, Lin 
Institutional 



Brave Men 

Yellow Magic 

Beyond the Call of Duty 

The Minute Man 

African Journey 

Flower Arrangements in Color- 
Elements of Industrial 
Chemistry 

Dilemma in Japan 

The Middle Span 

Tarawa, the Story of a Battle, 

Roger Conant, a Founder 
of Mass. 

Spies and Traitors of 
World War 2 

The Siege of Leningrad' 

Stina 

Atomic Energy 

Pirates of the Atlantic Coast. 

Romance of Boston Bay 

The Small General 

Builders of the Bridge 

Names of the Land 

Rolling Stone 

Silversides 

Egg Cookery 

Letter of Credit ^ 

Guide to the Peace 

High School Arithmetic 

School Algebra 

Report of 75th Anniversary 

War by Revolution 

Dusk of Empire 

American Guerrilla in the 
Philippines 

Flush 

A Chinese Village 

Britannica Book of the Year 

The Vigil of a Nation 
Proceedings of the American Legion 1943' 
Vital Records of W. Springfield, Mass. (2) 
Manual of the General Court 



54 
JUVENILE LIS1 



Aesop 

Angclo, V. 

Atwater, R. and F. 

Bailey, C. S. 

Baker, E. W. 

Baker, R. 

Bianco, M. 

Benz, F. E. 

Brown, Helen D. 

Browning, Robert 

Burton, Jean 

Busoni, R. 

Carson, J. M. H. 

Christman, A. B. 

Clymer, E. 

Coats worth, E. 

Colum, Padraic 

Coolidge, Susan 

Cote 

d'Aulaire, I. and E. 

Eberle, I. 

Flack, M. and Wiese, K. 

Gag, Wanda 



'Garrard, P. 
Garst, Shannon 
Grant, Gordon 
Grimm 

Hale, Lucretia 
Henry, M. 
Higgins, H. B. 
Ilin, M. 

Irving, Washington 
Jacobs, E. A. 
Judson, C. I. 
ICeene, C. 



Kingman, L. 
Xa Prade, E. 



Fables 

The Rooster Club 

Mr. Popper's Penguins 

Pioneer Art in America 

Stocky 

The First Woman Doctor 

The Street of Little Shops 

Pasteur 

Little Miss Phoebe Gay 

Pied Piper of Hamelin 

Garibaldi 

Stanley's Africa 

Son of Thunder, Patrick Henry 

Shen of the Sea 

The Grocery Mouse 

The Littlest House 

Arabian Nights 

What Katy Did at School 

Rabbit-Go-Lucky 

Wings for Per 

The Very Good Neighbors 
. The Story about Ping 

Gone is' Gone 

Snow White and the 

Seven Dwarfs 
Running away with Nebby 
Jack London 
Ships under Sail 
Tales 

The Peterkin Papers 
The Little Fellow 
Stephen Foster 
What Time is it? 
Rip van Winkle 
The Secret Spring 
Mary Jane at School 
The Clue of the Rusty Key 
The Portrait in the Sand 
Ilenka 
Alice in Orchestralia 



55 



Lathrop, W. 
Leaf, M. 
Le Blanc, G. 
Leeming, J. 
Lefevre, F. 

Leighton, M. 
Lockwood, M. 
Lloyd, T. 
McCloskey, R. 
MacNamara, J. 
Malvern, G. 
Mason, M. E. 

Meadowcroft, E. 
Milne, A. A. 

Mirza, Y. B. 
Molesworth, Mrs. 
Neville, L. 

O'Brien, J. J. 
Oti&, J. 

Pease, J. V. D. 
Roberts, T. 
Sackett, B. 
Seton, E. T. 
Seymour, A. H. 
Stafford and Zibold 
Stevenson, A. • 



Stewart, A. B. 
Stockton, F. R. 
Swift, J. 
Tousey, S. 
Tudor, T. 
Travers, P. L. 
Urmston, M. 
Wagoner, J. B. 
White, R. M. 
Wiggins, K. D. 



Northern Trail Adventure. 
The Story of Ferdinand 
The Bluebird for Children^ 
Brave Ships of World War 2: 
The Cock, the Mouse and 

the Little Red Hen 
The Singing Cave 
Macaroni 
Sky Highways 
Homer Price 
Extra 

Jonica's Island 
Mark Twain 
Young Audubon 
Along the Erie Towpath 
Now we are Six 
When we were Very Young 
The Rug that went to Meccai 
The Cuckoo Clock 
Aviation Dictionary for 

Boys and Girls 
Spike of Swift River 
Toby Tyler 
This is the World 
The Mystery Schooner 
Hurricane Treasure 
Wild Animals I have Knowm 
On the Edge of the Fjord 
Ling Tang 
Abe Lincoln 
Ben Franklin 
George Carver 
The Young Corsicans^ 
The Bee Man of Orn. 
Gulliver's Travels 
The Twin Calves 
Snow before Christmas 
Mary Poppins comes Back- 
Mystery of the Old Barn 
Julia Ward Howe 
Salute to the Marines 
The Birds' Christmas Carol. 



56 

REPORT OF THE POST-WAR PUBLIC WORKS 
COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

The Committee feeling that Acton has had up to this 
time, no emergency unemployment, and trying to be in a pos- 
ition to meet any emergency called together, by invitation, 
all departmental members of the Town of Acton on October 
25th 1945. The idea of the meeting was to talk over the 
needs and projects of the Departments. Sixteen members 
and the Selectmen with this Committee sat down to a round 
table discussion of the needs and possible improvements 
for Acton. 

The School Committee suggested an intermediate cen- 
tralized school building. Plans for such a building at an 
estimated cost of $165,000, are in their possession. This 
at no obligation to the Town of Acton. 

The Selectmen spoke of need of work on many of our 
narrow bridges about Town upon which some work has been 
done, also the drainage problem on Arlington Street, West 
Acton. They spoke of the need of Playgrounds in all sec- 
tions of the Town. 

The Cemetery Department would like to resurface all 
roads within the Grounds with a hard surface; and remove 
many curbs and level many plots in order that, with the 
help situation as it is, the care of the Cemeteries would 
be easier and better. 

The Welfare Department was represented but did not 
have anything that they could not cope with. 

The Fire Department is most anxious for a drying rack 
at the South Acton Station and we feel we can recommend 
one being installed- The Dept. also stated Acton Center 
Station should be remodeled. Chief MacGregor also stated 
that Acton would be faced with extension of the Alarm 
System as soon as the Telephone System completes its Dial 
System. 



57 

The Board of Health brought out the immediate need' 
of a Sewerage System for Acton, stating that the State 
Board might order it done. Thej?- impressed all with its 
urgency. This matter, we feel the people of Acton should 
be given the opportunity to act on at once. 

The Assessors recommend the immediate extension of 
the Water District. It was th consensus of opinion of those 
present, that the time has arrived for Acton to absorb the 
Water District and make it a Town responsibility. This 
action would automatically extend the System to cover the 
Town more completely. They also suggested a mapping 
of the Town. It was also brought out by them, that the 
present street lighting was not generally bright enough. 

As a result of this general meeting, your Post-War 
Committee at a later meeting, felt we would make our annual 
report a listing of the outcome of this meeting of the De- 
partments of the Town of Acton and to recommend: 

1 — The Board of Health take immediate action on the 
Sewerage System — 

2 — The Fire Department ask for and receive a drying^ 
rack, same to be constructed by a local Contractor — 

3 — The extension of the Water District throughout 
Acton. This to be accomplished by a committee being appoint- 
ed to work out proper procedure and reporting to the Town 
of Acton and the West and South Water District of Acton. 

4 — That immediate action be taken about constructing 
a sidewalk along Main Street, between the bridge in South 
Acton and the Maynard line, trying to get Maynard to co- 
operate, that the walks may be complete to where they now 
end in Maynard. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT R. JENKS, Chairman 
FORREST E. BEAN, SR. 
RICHARD F. DEANE, Secretary. 



58 

ASSESSORS' REPORT — 1945 

Tax assessed as follows: , 

Buildings, exclusive of land $2,551,450.00 

Land 632,525.00 

Personal 462,675.00 

83,646,650.00 

Valuation January 1 1944 3,670,905.00 

Decrease in valuation 24,255.00 

Rate of Taxation, 133-20 , 

Real Estate ? 105,707.99 

Personal Estate 15,360.84 

Polls 1,578.00 

$ 122,646.83 

-Amount of money raised: 

State Tax § 4,488.00 

State Parks Tax . 132-72 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 567.50 

County Tax . . 5,576.36 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 845.17 

Town Grant 108,242.85 

Overlay 2,794.23 

S 122,646.83 

Added Assessments: 

Polls $14.00 

Real Estate 3.32 

-Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise: 
.Number of Vehicles assessed, 1090 

Total value of Motor Vehicles and 

Trailers $ 123,950.00 

Rate of Excise, $35-60 

Total Excise $ 3,916.61 

ALBERT P. DURKEE, 

CARL C. FLINT, 

JAMES W. BAKER, 

Board of Assessors. 



59 
REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1945 

INVESTMENTS 
Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank $465-54 

U. S. War Bonds 3,000.00 

83,465.54 

RECEIPTS 
Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank §8.14 

U. S. War Bonds 75-00 

$83.m 

EXPENDITURES 

Harlan E. Tuttle, Treasurer of the 

EvangeHcal Church in Acton 863.14 

Town of Acton for pei^oetual care of the 

Goodnow lot in Woodlawri Cemetery 20-00 

$83.14. 

CHARLES E. SMITH, 
RALPH P. MARBLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



REPORT OF. ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

The trustees have signed orders to the treasurer for two 
hundred eighty-five dollars (8285.00) for the year ending 
December 31, 1945. 

These orders have been given after careful investiga- 
tion with knowledge that each person is worthy of help from 
this trust fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WALDO E. WHITCOMB, 
CLARA L. SAWYER, 
GRACE 0. LEAPS, 
Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund 



60 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Board of Health of Acton herewith submits its re- 
port for the year ending Dec 31, 1945. 

The principal activities of the Board during the past 
year have been the nursing service, the diphtheria clinic, 
the tuberculosis chest X-ray program, the care of the town 
■dump, and the collection of garbage. 

We have been able to continue the nursing service 
through the full co-operation of the registered nurses resid- 
ing in our town who have be6n most helpful during these 
busy war years with the shortage of doctors and nurses 
almost everywhere. We refer to Lillian F. Taylor, R.N., the 
school and town nurse, and her valued assistants Verne 
JFarquhar, R.N., Lydia Rhodes, R. N., and Hazel Roche, R.N. 

The diphtheria clinic was sponsored at the schools as 
in the previous years with a large number of pupils availing 
■themselves of this opportunity. Likewise the tuberculosis 
• chest X-ray program providc<d by the Middlesex County 
-Health Association was sponsored and was met with good 
response. 

The town dump is in excellent condition under the care 
'of W. J. Scanlon and is easily accessible for the dumping of 
refuse on the days scheduled. 

We are frank to admit that we are not entirely satisfied 
with the collection of garbage this yesiv and the lack of effi- 
ciency is due to several reasons- We hope if the town votes 
to continue collection of garbage this year that we may re- 
sume the excellent service with which this program initi- 
;ated. 

We recommend an appropriation of $4,000.00 for the 
cuse of this board for the year 1946. 



61 

Report of contagious diseases Jan. 1, 1945 to Dec. 31, 
1945: 

Poliomylitis Paralytic . . 1 

Gonorrhea 1 

Syphilis 3 

Dog Bite 16 

Whooping Cough 3 

Mumps 23 

Chicken Pox 24 

German Measles 1 

Deaths: 

Burial permits issued 26 

Residents of Acton 19 

Residents who died in other towns ... 8 

Residents of other places 6 

Total number of deaths 33 



Respectfully submitted, 



0. L. CLARK, M.D., Chairman 
L. H. CRAM, Secretary 



INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING 

To the Board of Health, 
Town of Acton. 

Gentlemen : 

I hereby submit my report as inspector of slaughtering 
for the year 1945. 

Beef 1 
Hogs 4 
Condemned 



Respectfully Submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 



62 
REPORT OF WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen : 



We respectfully submit the report of the Welfare Board 
for 1945. 

The appropriation for Welfare for 1945 was $4,000, out 
of which $2,739.00 was spent, leaving a balance of $1,261. 
During 1945, we aided seven cases in Acton and seven cases 
out of town with Acton settlements. At the present time, 
we are aiding eight welfare cases, four of which are in 
Acton. For the out-of-town bills during the past year, we 
paid $1,788.96 while $1,050.04 was paid for the four cases 
in Acton. In anticipation of bills which will be incurred 
during 1946, we find it necessary to ask for an appropriation 
of $4,000, which is the same as last year. 

For Aid to Dependent Children, we are asking an ap- 
propriation of $2,500. This is an increase over last year of 
$500. During 1945, we aided three families having a total 
of six dependent children. Our present case load is three 
families with a total of six children. 

We are asking for $23,000 for Old Age Assistance for 
the coming year. This is an increase of $3,000 over last 
year's appropriation. On January 1, 1945, our case load was 
65 and on December 31, 1945, it was 61. Although the num- 
ber of recipients remained practically the same as in 1944, 
administration and social services to these individuals have 
been increased by legislation. On January 1, 1946, a new 
law became effective exempting many children. from making 
the legal contributions which they had heretofore been re- 
quired to make to their parents, thereby necessitating an 
increase in our. demands for next year. During the entire 
year, 71 persons were aided under this category of assistance, 
53 of these had Acton settlements, 12 with out-of-town set- 
tlements and 6 which were unsettled. 



63 

Your Board, desiring to give you an analysis of the ex- 
penditures for 1945, submit the following: 

TEMPORARY AID 

Paid to State on Acton settled cases $912.50 

Paid to other places on Acton settled 

cases 876.46 

Paid to cases in Acton 1,050.04 

$2,739.00 

Estimated reimbursement from other 

towns 418.18 

Approximate net cost to Town of 

Acton §2,320.82 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Total expended $2,320.69 

Estimated Federal Grants 8423.00 

Estimated State reimbursement 773.58 1,196.58 

Approximate net cost to Town of 

Acton $1,124.11 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Total expended $33,213.22 

Estimated Federal Grants §13,525.46 

Estimated State reimbursement 13,447.16 

Estimated reimbursement from other 

places 655.60 27,628.22 

Approximate net cost to Town of 

Acton §5,585.00 

Appropriations recommended for 1946: 

Old Age Assistance $23,000.00 

Temporary Aid 4,000.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 2,500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN J. INESON, 
MARY M. LAFFIN, 
WALTER B. STEVENS, 
Board of Public Welfare. 



64 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen 

I herewith submit my 19th annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1945. 

Arrests and prosecutions made for the following of- 
fenses : 

Drunkenness 8 

Fish & Game violations 7 

Larceny 4 

Breaking & entering & larceny 1 

Having unbranded carcass in possession 1 

Malicious injury to property 1 

Assault with a dangerous weapon 1 

Begetting 1 

Assault with intent to rape 1 

Vagrancy 1 

Having loaded shotgun in motor vehicle 1 

Discharging firearms on highway 1 

Allowing operation of unregistered motor 

vehicle 1 

Law of the road 2 

Speeding 2 

Operating after revocation of license 1 

Operating under the influence of liquor 2 

Operating with improper brakes 1 

Operating an unregistered motor vehicle 1 

Violation of Executive Order 35 4 

Operating without a license 4 

Operating so as to endanger 6 

Failing to stop at Stop sign 12 

64 

Motor Vehicle accident report : 

Number of accidents reported 19 

Persons injured, male 15 

Persons injured, female 10 

Persons killed, male 1 

Accidents, operators had been drinking 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL FOLEY, 

Chief of Police. 



I 



65 
REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 



I hereby submit my report for the Fire Department for 
the year 1945. 

Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 

Building 7 

Automobile 3 

Chimney 6 

False 

Emergency 1 

Oil 6 



23 

I would like to recommend this year to take some action 
on our fire alarm system, as in the near future the telephone 
will be changed to dial, thereby leaving us in a serious posi- 
tion in regard to sending in an alarm. 

We were unable to get the West Acton house painted 
this year. Therefore it still needs to be done. 

Our equipment is in good condition and with some minor 
up-keep repairs, will do very well for the coming year. 

I would like to mention at this time that the inhalator, 
presented the Fire Company by Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Blan- 
chard, recently served its purpose very efficiently and suc- 
cessfully in the first tragedy the Fire Dept. has experienced. 
The firemen were very much pleased with its parformance 
and greatly appreciate the gift. 



Respectfully submitted, 



H. S. MacGREGOR, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



66 
PERSONNEL OF ACTON FIRE DEPARTMENT 

H. Stuart MacGregor — Chief Engineer 

PRECINCT 1 

Clarence Frost — Assistant Engineer 

Wendell Putnam ► Everett Putnam 

Ralph Rogers George Braman 

John Torkelsen Walter Liebfried 

Ivar Peterson • Ralph Phalen 

Allen Pederson Norman Livermore 

Thomas Meldrum Samuel Knowlton 

Raymond Perkins John Pederson Jr. 

PRECINCT 2 

David Clayton — Assistant Engineer 

Henry Soar Lloyd Priest 

Herbert Merriam Leslie Larsen 

Richard Lowden Ole Garthe 

Theron Lowden Hugh Hodgen 

Earl Hayward Albert Braman 

Wesley Larrabee Clarence Robbins 

Edwin Christofferson Malcolm Fullonton 

PRECINCT 3 

Arno H. Perkins — Assistant Engineer 

James Baker Albert Gravlin 

John Beach Ernest Banks 

Fred Kennedy James Wilson 

Raymond Gallant Porter Jenks 

Jean Garceau Norman Campbell 

Allan Cameron Orla Nichols 

Edgar Perkins Arthur Hurley 



67 

REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS FOR 

THE YEAR 1945 

We herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1945. 

The account of the town treasurer shows that during 
the past year the cemetery department has received and 
paid into the treasury the sum of $1372.38 itemized as 
follows : — 

Annual care of lots $525.00 

Burials 483.00 

Lowering device 63.00 

Sales of lots 90.00 

Foundations 173.38 

Miscellaneous 38.00 

Total $1,372.38 

We ask that these receipts may be considered in mak^ 
ing your appropriations for the current year. 

We recommend an appropriation for the care of the 
cemeteries the sum of $3,000.00 for the year 1946. 

There has been added to the perpetual care account the 
past year, in new accounts the sum of $1400.00. 

An itemized account of the expenditures for the care 
of the cemeteries will be found in the report of the town 
accountant. 

We have prepared a schedule of the receipts and expen- 
ditures on account of each lot under perpetual care, in books 
kept for that purpose, which may be examined by persons 
interested. 

.iORACE F. TUTTLE, 
RAY L. HARRIS 
HARRY E. HOLT 
Cemetery Commissioners^ 



68 
REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 

1943 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 $5,628.87 

Interest 366.45 

$5,995.32 

Paid Treasurer $5,983.96 

Tax Titles 11.36 

$5,995.32 

1944 TOWN TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 $15,614.92 

Interest 247.57 

$15,862.49 

Paid Treasurer $9,565.70 

Abated 117.59 

Tax titles 11.76 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 6,167.44 

$15,862.49 

1945 TOWN TAX 

Committed 105,711.30 

Interest 42.07 

$105,753.37 

Paid Treasurer $87,048.73 

Abated 858.22 

Tax Titles 33.20 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 17,813.22 

$105,753.37 
1943 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 $470.03 

Interest 33.10 

$503.13 
Paid Treasurer $503.13 

$503.13 



69 

1944 PERSONAL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 $1,033.91 

12.26 

§1,046.17 

Paid Treasurer $506.35 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 539.82 

$1,046.17 

1945 PERSONAL TAX 

Committed $15,360.84 

Interest 1.87 

$15,362.71 

Paid Treasurer $13,485.41 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 1,877.30 

$15,362.71 

1943 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 §26.00 

Interest 1.55 

'Cost 3.50 

§31.05 
Paid Treasurer $3L05 

$31.05 

1944 POLL TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 144.00 

Interest 1.43 

Cost 11.90 

$157.33 

Paid Treasurer 127.33 

Abated 6.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 24.00 

" ' " ^, $157.33 

1945 POLL TAX 

Committed $1,956.00 



70 

Cost .70 

$1,956.70 

Paid Treasurer ?1,220.70 

Abated 556.00 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 180.00 

11,956.70 

1943 EXCISE TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 ^ 117.55 

Interest 11.19 

$128.74 

Paid Treasurer ! $126.74 

Abated 2.00 

$128.74 

1944 EXCISE TAX 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1945 $562.19 

Committed Jan., 1945 12.00 

Interest 12.44 

$586.63 

Paid Treasurer $444.99 

Abated 18.01 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 123.63 

$586.63 

1945 EXCISE TAX 

Committed $3,916.61 

Interest ., .12 

$3,916.73 

Paid Treasurer $3,135.12 

Abated 59.64 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1946 721.97 

$3,916.73 



71 

SUMMARY OF COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

JANUARY 1, 1946 

Total Debits 

1943 Town Tax $5,995.32 

1944 Town Tax 15,862.49 

1945 Town Tax 105,753.37 

1943 Personal Tax 503.13 

1944 Personal Tax 1,046.17 

1945 Personal Tax 15,362.71 

1943 Poll Tax 31.05 

1944 Poll Tax 157.33 

1945 Poll Tax 1,956.70 

1943 Excise Tax 128.74 

1944 Excise Tax 586.63 

1945 Excise Tax 3,916.73 



$151,300.37 

Total Credits 

Paid Treasurer 122,179.21 

Abat3d 1,617.46 

Tax Titles 56.32 

Ucollected Jan. 1, 1946 27,447.38 

$151,300.37 

CARRIE M. DURKEE, 

Collector of Taxes 



72 

REPORT OF TOWN NURSE 

January 4, 194(? 

To the Board of Health 

Acton, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit my report for the year ending Decent 

ber 31, 1945, with services as follows: 

Bedside calls 2010 

Child welfare 200 

Pre-natal 186 

Post-natal 210 

Night calls 175 

Over 200 hours of night nursing was done in 1945. 
Four patients x-rayed and examined at the Middlesex 

County Sanitorium in Waltham. Eight were taken to the 

Emerson Hospital for various causes. Two taken to Lake- 

ville Sanitorium for X-rays. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lillian F. Taylor, R. N. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Animals for 
the year 1945 : , 

Barns Visited 47 

Cows 286 

Bulls 18 

Young Cattle • 78 

Sheep 2 

Goats . 27 

Hogs 79 

Dog Bites 16 

Dogs Quarantined 15 

One case of dog bite occurred in the dark hours of 
early morning and the dog could not be identified. 

Rabies 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. ALLSOPP. 

Inspector of Animals. 



73 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1945 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
Acton, Massachusetts: 

I herewith submit my report for the year 1945. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1945 §93,582.31 

Receipts for 1945: 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Highways S 7,355.57 

Old Age Assistance 17,883.83 

Highways, Chapter 90 2,799.45 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 11,596.77 

Aid Dependent Children' Federal 432.35 

Highways, Chapter 569 6,708.60 

Income Tax 16,170.00 

Corporation Tax 16,080-51 

Meal Tax 921,20 

Reimbursement Loss of Taxes. . 619.44 

Aid Dependent Taxes 675.59 

Tuition 449.05 

Snow Removal 3,842-94 

885,535.30 

Received from County Treasurer: 

Highways $ 2,079.75 

Dog Account, Refund , 769.15 

Dog Officer, Refund 216.00 

Concord Road 719.70 

$ 3,784.60 

Received from Carrie M. Durkee, 
Collector of Taxes: 

Poll, 1943 $ 26.00 

Excise, 1943 115.55 

Personal, 1943 470-03 

Town, 1943 5,617.51 

Poll, 1944 114.00 



74 

Excise, 1944 , 432.55 

Personal, 1944 494.09 

Town, 1944 9,318.13 

Poll, 1945 1,220.00 

Excise, 1945 3,135.00 

Personal, 1945 13,483.54 

Town, 1945 87,011.30 

Interest 728.56 

Costs 12.95 



Miscellaneous Receipts : 

Lester A- Sebastian, License ... $ 400.00 

Dewey Boatman, License 400.00 

Harlan E. Tuttle, Dog Licenses . 927.60 

Selectmen, Licenses 34.00 

City of Somerville, Old Age 

Assistance, 126.66 

Elwin Hollowell, Care Lots, 

Woodlawn 210.00 

Elwin Hollowell, Foundations . . 94.88 

Arthur F. Davis, Library Fines 33.76 

Jacob Stoler, Advertisement .... 4.13 
City of Cambridge, Welfare ... ' 226.83 

Board of Health, Licenses 31.00 

Marjorie Allen, Surplus Revenue 100.00 

W. Stuart Allen, Surplus Revenue 400.00 

Wallace Conant, Surplus Revenue 29.95 

Murray Brown, Surplus Revenue 100-00 

Lowell Cram, Surplus Revenue 17.67 

John S. White, Surplus Revenue 75.00 
Webster S. Blanchard, Surplus 

Revenue 189.84 

Concord Dist. Court, Fines 206-85 

Board of Health, Nurse Services 352-50 

Harry Holt, Rent of Hall 539.50 

Hannah Goward, Surplus 

Revenue 500.00 

Howard Billings, Surplus 

Revenue 200.00 

Chester Robbins, Surplus Revenue 100.00 



1122,179.21 



75 



Fred Kennedy, Care Lots 

Mt. Hope 315.00 

Fred Kennedy, Burials 483.00 

Fred Kennedy, Lowering Device 63-00 

Fred Kennedy, Miscellaneous . . 38.00 
Fred Kennedy, Sale Lots 

Mt. Hope 30.00 

James Mollison, L. Mollison, 

Tuition 185-73 

Est. Edwin Phalen, Surplus 

Revenue 100.00 

Town of Ashland, Old Age Assist. 48.59 
Horace F. Tuttle, Sale of Lots 

Woodlawn 60.00 

Cemetery Fund, Transfer 800.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund, 

Transfer 2,000.00 

Lester A. Sebastian, Surplus 

Revenue 100.00 

Mary Lothrop, Library Fines . . 60.21 

Mary Lothrop, Sale Rug 12.00 

Carl E. Anderson, Sealer Weights 65.42 

Ethel Rawitser, Surplus Revenue 100.00 

Mary Lothrop, Sale Books 14.75 

Boston and Maine R. R. 

Snow Removal 20.00 

Harry Holt, Telephone Calls . . 3.2( 

Mary Lothrop, Miscellaneous . . . 4.90 

Fred Kennedy, Foundations .... 78.50 

Town of Concord, Land Tax . . . 27-96 
Town of Marblehead, Old Age 

Assistance 128.40 

Town of Wrentham, Old Age 

Assistance 171.45 

Town of Acton, Machinery Acct. 390.08 
Town of Ashland, Old Age 

Assistance 78.10 

Memorial Library Fund, Trans. . 321.51 

Cemetery Surplus Fund, Trans- . 325.00 

Town of Acton, Withhold. Taxes 1,879.36 



76 



Central Savings Bank, Cemetery 

Fund 18.75 

Lowell Inst. Savings, Eliz White 

Fund 15.00 

City of Boston, Welfare 119.67 

Town of Acton, Blue Cross 37.10 

Medford Savings, Susan Noyes 

Hosmer Fund 22.50 

Carrie M. Durkee, Perpetual Care, 

Mt. Hope 100.00 

Wildey Savings, Susan Noyes 

Hosmer Fund 18.75 

Town of Acton, Teacher's Retire- 
ment 429.00 

Selectmen, Maps .50 

Carrie M. Durkee, Certificate Liens 48.00 

Acton High School, Ind. Arts 

Fund 121.85 

Acton High School, Library Fund 13.67 

Michael Foley, Revolver Permits 7.50 

Michael Foley, Bicycle Registra- 
tions 6.75 

Town of Westford, Schools 424.39 

Georgia E. Whitney, Fund Trans- 
fer 75.00 

Elizabeth White Fund, Trans- 
fer 285.00 

Acton High School, Miscellaneous 2.10 

Albert W. Locke, Perpetual Care, 

Mt. Hope 100.00 

Town of Boxboro, Schools 2,500.00 

Town of Boxboro, Welfare 95.14 

Luke Blanchard Fund, Transfer 25-00 

Theron A. Lowden, Ins. Refund 4.87 



$ 17,674.87 



Total Cash Receipts $229,173-98 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1945 93,582.31 

Sum Total for 1945 $322,756.29 



77 

Payments for 1945 

Selectmen's Orders $214,148.98 

State Taxes 667.21 

. $214,816.19 

Cash Balance December 31, 1945 $107,940.10 



OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 

High School Addition Notes, 

165-176 due 1946 to 1957 $ 12,000.00 

Departmental Equipment Loan, 

note 182 due 1946 1,000.00 

SUSAN NOYES HOSMER FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $82,238-95 

Unexpended Balance 1,206.17 

$83,445.12 

Received Interest for 1945 1,589-67 



$85,034.79 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks $83,034.79 

Transferred to Town Account 2,000-00 



$85,034.79 



CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $48,737.21 

Unexpended Balance 1,422.48 

$50,159.69 

Received for Perpetual Care 

for 1945 1,400.00 

Received Interest for 1945 893.36 



$52,453.05 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks $51,65305 

Transfered to Town Account 800.00 

$52,453.05 



■ 78 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $25,000.00 

Unexpended Balance 2,415.75 $27,415.75 



Received Interest for 1945 . 554.98 



$27,970.73 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks $27,685.73 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1945 285-00 



$27,970.73 

WILDE MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $15,846.15 

Unexpended Balance 530.64 

$16,376.79 

Received Interest for 1945 313.72 

$16,69a51 
Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks $16,369.00 

Transfered to Town Account 321.51 



$$16,690.51 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $14,073.70 

Unexpended Balance 379.20 



$14,452.90 

Received Interest for 1945 290.11 



$14,743.01 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks $14,668.01 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1945 75.00 

$14,743.01 



79 

LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Balance 
Received Interest for 1945 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Bank Balances in Savings Banks 
Transferee! to Town Account 



CEMETERY SURPLUS 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Balance 

Received Interest for 1945 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Bank 
Transferred to Town Account 



? 1,100.08 
WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Balance § 660.49 

Received Interest for 1945 13.27 



? 


1,504.00 
23.93 


$ 


1,527.93 


$ 


1,502.93 
25.00 


$ 


1,527.93 


§ 


1,083.78 
16.30 


$ 


1,100.08 


§ 


775.08 
325.00 



I 673.76 
Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 673.76 

ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 
Principal Fund $ 2,845.00 

Unexpended Balance 264.75 



Company Salaries for 1945 
Received Interest for 1945 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Bank 



$ 1.509.38 

230.00 

63.00 


$ 3,402.75 
? 3,402.75 



80 ^ 

ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1945 

Principal Fund ? 1,500.00 

Unexpended Balance 9.38 S 1,509.3.8 



Received Interest for 1945 22.61 



§ 1,531.99 



Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Banks $ 1,531.99 

HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 

MONUMENT PERPETUAL CARE 

Principal Fund $ 700-00 

Received Interest for 1945 9.35 



? 709.35 
Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 709.35 

HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 

PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY LOTS 

3-4-8-22-26-27-Woodlawn 

Principal Fund $ 700.00 

Balance December 31, 1945 
Balance in Savings Bank $ 700.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

WM. HENRY SOAR 

Town Treasurer, 



81 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1946 

Your Committee on Finance respectfully submits the 
following recommendations for the ensuing year. 

We wish to call attention to the item of outlays in the 
School Budget of $2750.00. 

Included in this amount is $1700.00 for the installation 
of a stoker for heater in the High School which we do not 
recommend. 

It is the opinion of your Finance Committee that items 
such as this, being Capitol Outlay, should not be placed in 
the Annual Budget but should be under separate arti- 
cles in the Town Warrant, so that the voters of town 
may decide whether or not they wish these expenditures. 

When Articles of this nature are placed in the Annual 
Budget, it does not represent a true picture of the annual 
cost for the maintenance of the different departments. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the different 
departments of the town for the assistance given to us in 
the new breakdown of the budget and herewith submit a 
comparative table of the towns in our group. 



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84 
Therefore be it moved and 

Voted: That the following sums of money be raised 
and appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter desig- 
nated and that the same be expended only for the purposes 
under the direction of the respective boards, committees, or 
officers of the town, as follows: 

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90 



Article 4: 

Recommend appropriating $500.(X) for Memorial Day. 

Article 6: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $250.00 for Dog 
Officer. 

Article 8: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $500.00 for purchase 
of Town Forest land. 

Article 9: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $3'00.00 for repairing 
Town Clock. 

Article 10: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $150.00 administra- 
tion expenses for Old Age Assistance, aid to Dependent Chil- 
dren and General Relief. 

Article 12: 

Recommend transfer from Surplus Revenue Account the sum 
of $450.00 for Hose Dryer in South Acton Fire House. 

Article 13: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $1800.00 for Garbage 
Collection. 

Article 14: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $250.00 for replace- 
ment Shade Trees. 

Article 16: 

Recommend Audit of Town Books. 

Article 17: 

Recommend transfering the sum of $4500.00 from Surplus 
Revenue Account for the purchase of a truck for Highway 
Dept. 

-Article 18: 

Recommend. No on this article until law is clarified. 

-Article 19: 

Recommend. Pass over. 

-Article 20: 

Recommend. Pass over. 

-Article 21: 

Recommend transferring the sum of $600.00 from Surplus. 
Revenue Account for the purchase of Snow Plow. 

Article 22: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $100.00 for painting 
traffic lines and signs. 



91 

Article 23: 

Recommend. No action at this time. 

Article 24: 

Recommend transferring the sum of $4200.00 from Surplus- 
Revenue Account for the purchase of Forest Fire Truck. 

Article 25: 

Recommend transferring the sum of $450.00 from Surplus 
Revenue Account for the purchase of Police Cruiser. 

Article 26: 

Recommend this article and appropriation of $500.00 for 
expenses. 

Article 27: 

Recommend transfering the sum of $400.00 from Surplus 
Revenue Account to paint the West Acton Fi^e House. 

Article 28: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $3000.00 for new con- 
struction on Main Street. 

Article 29: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $200.00 for Power 
^Nlower for Town Grounds. 

Article 30: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $2500.00 from Overlay 
Surplus Account for Reserve Fund. 

Article 31: 

Recommend this article. 

Article 32: 

Recommend appropriation of $200.00 for extra snow fence;?. 

Article 33: 

Recommend appropriation of $400.00 for use of Zoning 
Committee. 

Article 34: 

Recommend appropriating the sum of $450.00 for Sewerage 
Committee expenses. 

Article 35: 

Recommend transferring the sum of $1000.00 from Surplus 
Revenue Account to purchase and erect fence on the Coward 
Field Playground. 

Note: We recommend, if Articles for Capital Outlay amounting 
to $11,600.00 are accepted, the expenditures be taken from 
Surplus Revenue Fund. 

If raised and appropriated it will increase the tax rate 
approximately $2.00. 



92 

The sum of $2,224.33 was transferred in 1945 from the Re- 
serve Fund to the following accounts: 

General Government $ 122.14 

Board of Health 329.51 

Fire Dept. Expense 69.44 

Charities, Welfare 23.64 

Cemeteries, Salaries 11.37 

Building and Grounds 229.23 

School Dept 1,175.00 

Village Highway 86.51 

Unclassified 177.49 

$ 2,224.33 

Respectfully submitted, 
Precinct 1— Alden C. Flagg, W. Stuart Allen 
Precinct 2 — Mrs. Pauline Bursaw, William T. Merriam 
Precinct 3 — Albert W. Locke, Porter Jenks. 

Finance Committee. 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen : 

The Acton Town Forest Committee herewith submits the 
following report for the year 1945. 

The committee wishes to report that no land was purchased 
with the 500.00 appropriated in 1945 (for the purpose of buying 
additional forest land), as we were unable to locate desirable 
property of an acreage that would coincide with the appropria- 
tion. 

W^e recommend that an appropriation of 500. CO be made this 
year for the purpose of purchasing additional forest land, this 
appropriation to be used in conjunction with the $500.00 now 
available. 

Your town forest now totals 71 acres. It is the aim of this 
committee to increase this acreage substantially before replanting 
and thinning the existing forest land, unless an unemployment 
crisis arises before such time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE A. FROST, Chairman 

JAMES J. KNIGHT 

ARNO H. PERKINS, Secretary . 



93 

REPORT OF TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen of Acton: 



I herewith submit my annual report covering the finan- 
cial transactions of the town for the year ended December 
31, 1945. 

I have included a detailed statement of the expenditures 
of each department and a tabulated record showing appro- 
priations, transfers and balances as of December 31, 1945 

The amount of" maturing debts for 1946 amounts to 
$2,000. 

The surplus revenue at the end of the year show^s a 
substancial gain over the previous year. 

I have audited the books of the Collector of Taxes and 
verified the cash on hand. I have audited the books of the 
treasurer and verified the several trust funds in his custody. 

I have verified the funds in the custody of trustees. 



HOWARD L. JONES 

Tow^n Accountant 



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99 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DEPARTMENTAL PAYMENTS 
Treasurer's Receipts 

Treasurer's Itemized Report $229,173.98 

Cash Balance Jan. 1, 1945 93,582.31 $322,756.29 



Payments 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Selectmen's Dept. 

Salaries and Wages: 

George S. Braman 283.33 

Arthur W. Lee 216.68 

Lawrence Donnelly 200.00 

Virginia Milbery, senior clerk 871.66 

Marjory Davis 242.56 1,814.23 

Expenses : 

Middlesex County Selectmen's 

Ass'n. Dues 9.00 

Postage 31.87 

Stationery 16.32 

Advertising 4.13 

Forms 5.88 

Sundry Expenses 3.65 70.85 

Finance Committee 

Expenses : 

Ass'n. Dues 10.00 

Reports 27.00 

Attending meetings 38.85 75.85 

Moderator 

Salary 

Albert P. Durkee 15.00 

Town Accountant 

Salary 

Howard L. Jones 650.00 

Expenses: 

Vouchers 11.76 

Stationery 50 

Postage and telephones 3.93 16.19 



100 

Treasurer 

Salary 

Wm. Henry Soar 650.00 

Expenses : 

Postage 150.93 

Telephone 24.40 

Stationery 41.58 

Safety Deposit Box 6.00 

Typewriter Repairs 7.00 

Sundry expenses 2;.15 232.06 

Collector of Taxes 

Salary : 

Carrie M. Durkee 1,208.35 

Expenses : 

Postage 112.94 

Books 32.31 

Printing and forms 63.72 

Tax Title Expense 8.54 

Tax Collector's Ass'n. Dues 1.00 218.51 

Assessors 

Salaries: 

Albert P. Durkee 500.00 

Carl E. Flint 500.00 

James W. Baker 500.00 1,500.00 

Expenses : 

Assessors Ass'n. Dues 6.00 

Books and forms 16.87 

Notices of transfers 25.53 

Tax Tables 1.00 

Attending Meetings 50.00 99.40 

Town Clerk 

Salary : 

Harlan E. Tuttle 325.00 

Expenses : 

Maps 4.51 

Forms 2.0O 

Recording Vital Statistics 88.50 



101 

Telephone 20.00 

Postage 18.00 

Repairing Typewriter 8.00 

Ass'n. Dues 3.00 144.01 

Election and Registration 

Salaries : 

Election Officers 72.00 

James B. Wilson, registrar 150.00 

Wm. B. Feeley, registrar 150.00 

Harlan E. Tuttle 35-00 

Harlan E. Tuttle 125.00 

Robert Willett, posting warrants 5.00 

Iver Pederson, notifying officers 5.00 567.00 

James W. Coughlin, registrar 25.00 

Expenses : 

Rent 12.00 

Cards 48.86 

Printing 46.14 

Looseleaf Sheets 10.13 117.13 

Buildings and Grounds 

Salaries and Wages : 

Harry Holt, custodian 624.00 

Harry Holt, care of grounds 484.23 

Fred Kennedy, care of common at 

W. Acton 15.00 

Ole Garthe 6.00 1,129.23 

Expenses : 

Heat 549.23 

Light 291.13 

Telephone 45.65 

2 doors 34.58 

Cleaning bronze plates 12.00 

Installing lights, highways-buildings 121.32 

Outside light installed : 8.67 

Cleaning cesspool 28.00 

Water 15.32 

Insurance on high school building 240.00 



102 



Work on town clock 33-00 

Stove 10.00 

Dust down 19.75 

Hardware and tools 51.03 

Paint and brushes 16.67 

Wax 5.55 

Kerosene 5.30 

Lumber 96.28 

Towels 2045 

Flags 12.62 

2 lanterns 3.90 

Hauling leaves 10.60 

Wiring 28.59 

Boiler inspection 5.00 

Repairs to Fire House 12.40 

Repairs 51.79 

Lights, batteries 20-80 

Sharpening and repairing lawn 

mowers 69.50 

Rope 2.29 



1,821.42 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Police Department: 
Salaries and wages: 

Michael Foley, salary §1,800-00 

Michael Foley, bonus 300.00 



$2,100.00 

Special officers 399.00 

Expenses : 

Auto Repairs $241.66 

Gas and oil 267.63 

Telephone 112.24 

Servicing radio 88.95 

Antenna installed 25.00 

Uniform 50.30 

Signs 10-98 

Insurance 14.25 

Repairing typewriter^ 9.00 

Cleaning blankets 1.50 

Batteries 4.32 

Cartridges 7.00 



103 

Books 2.20 

Sundry expenses 3.55 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries and Wages: 

Annual salaries $460.00 

Wages for fires 680.45 

Janitors 360.00 



Expenses : 

Heat $314.55 

Lights 139.50 

Telephone 97.71 

Gas and oil 43.50 

Towel service 14.00 

Water 36.00 

Paint and brush 8.80 

Batteries 3.65 

Printing 16.28 

Stove pipe 5.18 

Door 9.63 

Labor on door 3.75 

Pipe and fittings 4.50 

Gloves 8.10 

Manuals 4.00 

Flag 4.50 

Repairing door 6.75 

Parts for whistle and labor 48-70 

New equipment 212.55 

Repairs on equipment 187.79 



FOREST FIRES 



838.58 



1,500.45 



1,169.44 



Wages : 

Fighting fires 432.10 

Fire Boxes and New Hose: 

Instalhng 4 new boxes $520.00 

400 ft. new hose 450.80 

970.80 



104 

Expenses : 

HYDRANTS 

Town of Concord 1253.00 

West and South Water Supply District 3,200.00 

3,453.00 

.SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Salary : 

Carl E. Anderson, includes transportation 200-00 

Expenses : 

Advertising $4.00 

Books, seals and dies 12.51 

16.51 

MOTH DEPARTMENT 
Wages : 

Superintendent ?435.10 

Labor I 264.24 

699.34 

Expenses : 

Truck $1S7.40 

Gas and oil 91.13 

Truck registration 2-00 

Spraying material 459.71 

Battery 14.95 

Rim, plugs, and tire 11.36 

Attending meeting 3.50 

Hose couplings 31-74 

Shade tree gun 16.00 

Tools ^ 7.72 

Telephone 4.25 

Fire guard 10.50 

Sundry expenses 4.46 

794.72 

TREE WARDEN 

Wages : 

Superintendent $573.80 

Labor 125.28 

699.08 

Expenses : 

Truck $187.80 

Rope and saws 24-62 

Sign 3.0!0 



105 



Sharpening tools 17.70 

Belt 15.50 

Rope 14.97 

Tools 22.32 

Parts 2.50 



SPECIAL FOR TREE REPLACEMENT 

Wages : 

Superintendent $70-30 

Labor 14.40 

Truck 22.20 

Kirkegard's Nurseries, trees 143.10 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

Salaries and Wages: 

Lowell H. Cram, clerk $15.00 

Lillian Taylor, town nurse, 

includes transportation 2,334-96 

Special nurses, includes 

transportation '.... 737.50 

Labor at town dump 710.40 

Dr. E. A. Mayell, professional 

services 142.00 

E. E. Allsopp, agent 39.65 

Expenses : 

Medical supplies §101-62 

Postage and telephone 3.12 

Stationery 2.67 

Inspection, issuing licenses, 

permits 22.90 

Repairing pump 2.50 

Gasoline .97 



288.41 



250.00 



3,979.51 



133.78 



CATTLE INSPECTOR 
Salary : 

Ernest E- Allsopp 125.00 



106 

GARBAGE CX)LLECTION 
Collection of garbage as per contracts $1,640.00 

Advertising 17.93 

Postage, telephone and stenogra- 
phic services 15.75 



HIGHWAYS 
Village 
Wages : 

Superintendent 1264.00 

Labor 608.12 



Expenses : 

Trucks $332.90 

Signs 21.50 

Drop light 4.75 

Forge blower 10.00 

Tools 37.08 

Telepho(ne 40.06 

Paint, gas, oil, anti freeze 146-06 

Pipe 3.20 

Zinc sulphate 6.75 

Posts 1.71 

Sharpening tools 6.50 

Stationery 7.35 

Sundry items 18.65 

Chapter 81 

Wages : 

Superintendent $1,196.00 

Labor 2,891.96 

Expenses : 

Trucks 2,444.19 

Stone and Dust 1,932.84 

Oil and tar :. ... 3,439.33 

Rental of equipment 310-89 

Hauling stone and dust 1,734.80 

Gravel (51.00 

Hpe 113.95 

Frames, covers 93.93 

Bolts, v^ashers 40.18 



1,673.68 



872-12 



636-51 



14,249.07 



107 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Wages : 

Superintendent $304.00 

Labor 837.79 

Expenses : 

Trucks 484.77 

Stone and dust 1,493.73 

Oil and tar 1,366.97 

Rental of equipment 653-05 

Hauling stone and dust 258.15 

Chapter 90 Concord Road 

Wages : 

Superintendent $120.00 

Labor 712.16 

Expenses : 

Trucks 197.20 

Rental of equipment 976.13 

Guard Rail Posts 78.00 

Bars 12.81 

Lumber and Cement 62.80 

Snow Removal 

Wages : 

Superintendent $644.00 

Labor 1,912.30 

Expenses : 

Trucks 1,962.27 

Plowing snow 4,388.00 

Sand 465.94 

Salt 157-35 

Bolts 39.14 

Parts and repairs 102.95 

Equipment rental 32.99 

Blades 110.34 

Labor on plows and sander 56.10 

Shovels and blades 118.68 

Gas,oil 9-34 

Road Machinery 

Road drags $25.21 



5,398.46 



2,159.10 



$9,999.40 



108 

Steel brooms 11.76 ' 

Parts and labor on grader 210.54 

Cent, pump 131.48 

Tools 12.96 

Stone drag 10-00 

Gasoline 46.00 

Repairs 33.00 

Parts 71.67 

Welding 10.00 

Paint 4.90 

Sundry items 15.93 

583.45 

Street Lighting 

Boston Edison Co 3,443.19 

Town Roller Repairs 550.00 

Buildings 

Wages : 

Superintendent $24.00 

Labor 522.00 

Expenses : 

Trucks 53.60 

Shingles, nails, etc 289.41 

Paint and brushes 104.50 

Filing saws 1.00 

994.51 

CHARITIES 

Public Welfare 
Temporary Aid: 

Cash to individuals $655.75 

Provisions 178.33 

Fuel 72.95 

Medical aid 43.01 

Rehef by other cities and towns 1,788.96 

2,739.00 

Salaries and Wages: 

Benjamin Ineson $125.00 

Mary Laffin 75.00 . 

Walter Stevens 75.00 

Virginia Milbery, clerk 373.64 

648.64 



109 

Administration Account : 

Greater Boston Community Coun- 
cil of^ Social Agencies $8.00 

Forms 6.75 

Attending meetings 85.25 

100.00 

Old Age Assistance : 

Cash aid $18,873.04 

Indirect payments 331.32 

Aid by other cities and towns 47340 

U. S. Grant: 

Cash aid 13,535.46 

33,213.22 

Administration Account: 
U. S. Grant: 

Salary and expenses 451.15 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Cash aid $1,897-69 

U. S. Grant: 

Cash aid 423.00 

2,320.69 

Administration Account : 

U. S. Grant: 

Salary and expenses 9.35 

Soldiers' Benefits: 

Salaries: , 

Waldo J. Flint, agent 50.00 

Medical and hospital aid $57.00 

Fuel 22.50 j 

Clothing ^ 5.05 

Rent 39.80 

Transportation, several trips to hospital 70.25 
State Aid : 

Cash aid 120-00 

314.60 

EDUCATION 

No. 59 Salaries and Wages 49,358.72 

No. 60 Fuel 2,263.64 

No. 61 Mass. Retirement Board 217.50 

No. 62 Misc. expense, supplies, textbooks 4,933.59 

No. 63 Transportation 4,993-50 



110 

No. 64 Vocational education 72.40 

No. 65 Janitors' supplies, power 1,928.29 

No. 66 General repairs, outlays 2,246.09 

Waterproofing north wall 1,558-00 

Fluorescent lighting 1,418.00 

LIBRARIES 
Salaries — Wages : 

Librarian $198.00 

Assistant librarian 99.00 

Janitor 148.50 

Binding and repairing books 34.33 

Branch Libraries 

Librarians 200.00 

Janitor 15.60 

69543 

Expenses : 

Heat $330.42 

Lights 41.90' 

Postage 1.40 

Insurance 49.68 

Water 12.00 

Curtains 42-00 

Cards, slips, labels, etc 30.16 

Lock 7.50 

Branch Libraries 

Lights : 7.91 

Fuel 33.85 

Cleaning 6.00 

Transportation of books 44-00 

— • 606.82 

Books : 

New books and magazines 547.72 

CEMETERIES 
Wages : 

Superintendent $1,480.33 

Labor 931.04 

2,411.37 

Expenses : 

Loam $10.00 

Paint 11.90 

Lumber 25-14 



Ill 

Tools 16.46 

Water 21.09 

Gas and oil 28.27 

Fertilizer 40.00 

Lawn seed 20.37 

Cement 11.05 

Repairing mowers 30.41 

Stationery 6-50 

Postage and telephone 15.60 

Lighting 17.25 

Flowers 10.70 

Trees and shrubs 25.00 

Load of stone 4.00 

Disinfectant 5.46 

Bolts, nuts, etc ^ 3.39 

Trucks * 92.00 

394.59 

Compressor 400.00 

Perpetual Care 
Wages : 

Superintendent $868-50 

Labor 371.70 

Flowers 72.65 

Trucking 15.00 

1,327.85 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Care of lot 25.00 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 
Wages : 

Superintendent §765.00 

Labor 59.04 

Tar 497.76 

Dust 49.70 

Flowers 23.48 

Trucks 192.75 

Weed killer 38.00 

Loam 10.00 

Gasoline 18-70 

Cement 4.75 

Filling in graves 15.00 

Repairing mowers 3-50 



112 

Work on shade trees 305.00 

Sundry expense 3.35 



UNCLASSIFIED 
Unclassified Account: 
Wages : 

Clerical work $56.65 

Perambulating town lines 45.00 

Delivering Town Reports 16.25 

Pay roll — emergency rescue 

work 85.00 

Professional services 41.25 

Flags 25.95 

Desk and chair 12.00 

Maps " 1.50 

Writing easements 5.00 

Printing : 10.53 

Repairing typewriter 9.00 

Postage 9'-5t0 

Sundry items 12.40 

Memorial Day: 

Music §125.00 

Flags 41.75 

Flowers and wreaths 90.10 

Refreshments 7.38 

Sundry expense 1.70 



1,986.03 



330.03 



265.93 

Recreation: Playgrounds 

Jones Field 
Wages : 

Superintendent $16.00 

Labor 12.80 

Trucks 34.40 

$63.20 

Goward Field 

Trucks 76.80 

140.00 

Purchase of land and buildings from 

Acton Agricultural Holding Co 6,000.00 

Dog Officer: 



Interest on Notes and Bonds: 
Interest on High School Bonds $40.00 

Interest -on Hig'h Schodl A d .d i t i o n 

Bonds 195.00 

Interest on Fire Truck Notes 20.00 



250.00 



755.29 



113 

Wages : 

Arthur Fraser $78.97 

Printing 3.03 

Keeping and destroying 42 dogs 168.00 

Rationing Board: 
Wages : 

Clerks $672.82 

Telephone 65.55- 

Stationery 14.42 

Moving cabinets 2.50 

Committee on Public Safety: 
Wages : 

Clerks $264.80 

Telephone 5.85 

Bond 5.00 

275.65 

Town Reports: 

Printing 1,000 472.20 

Bonds : 

Treasurer's Bonds $96.50 

Collector of Taxes 123.00 

Town Clerk 7.50 

Deputy Collector 5-.00 

232.00 

Liability Insurance: 

Premium $689.36 

Notes and Bonds: 
High School Bond $1,000.00 

High School Addition Bond 1,000.00 

Fire Truck Note 1,000.00 

$3,000.00 



255.00 



114 

NO APPROPRIATION ITEMS 

State Tax $4,488.00 

State Park Tax 99.71 

State Au^it 567-50 

County Tax 5,591.96 

County Hospital Asse:^sment 845.17 

County Dog Licenses 900.00 

Tax Refunds 279.90 

Mass. Teachers Retirement 429.00 

Trust Accounts. 560.00 

Trust Accounts^ Ihterest 75^00 

Withholding- Tax 1,792.76 

Blue Cross 37.10 

$214,816.19 
Cash balance December 31, 1945 107,940.10 

$322,756.29 
RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 

Selectmen's Dept. Salaries $14.23 

Treasurer Expense Account 40.00 

Collector of Taxes Expense Account 20.00 

Assessors' Expense Account 29.40 

Election & Registration Salaries 17.00 

Buildings & Grounds, Wages 229.23 

Fire Department, expenses 69.44 

Village Highways, expenses 86.51 

Sealer of Weights & Measure, expenses 1.51 

Board of Health, Salaries 329.51 

Public Welfare, Wages 23.64 

Fuel Account, School Dept 75.00 

Janitors' Supplies and Power, School 

Dept 800.00 

Repairs and Outlays, School Dept 300.00 

Cemetery, Wages 11.37 

Town Reports 72.20 

Liability Insurance 89.36 

Memorial Day 15.93 

$2,224.33 

Unexpended Balance 275.67 

2,500.00 



115 

Machinery Fund 

Balance January 1, 1945 $895.50 

Received from Rentals 390.08 

1,285.58 

Trans, to Road Machinery Account $875.00 

Balance December 31, 1945 410-58 

1,285.58 

763.35 

Balance January 1, 1946 $763.35 



Cemetery Land Fund 

Balance January 1, 1945 $673.35 

Received from Sale of Lots 90.00 



TRUST FUNDS 



Trust Funds, Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Town Treasurer $202,006.44 

In Custody of Trustees 3,465.54 



$205,471.98 

Elizabeth White Charity Fund $27,685.73 

Georgia E. Whitney Charity Fund 14,668.01 

Wilde Memorial Library Fund 16,369.00 

Acton Firemen's ReUef Fund 3,402.75 

West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund * 673.76 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 51,653.05 

Cemetery Surplus Fund 775.08 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 1,502.93 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 83,034.79 

Charlotte Conant School Fund 1,531.99 

Henry S. Raymond 

Monument Perpetual Care Fund 709.35 

In Custody of Trustees: 

Charlotte L. Goodnow Fund 3,465.54 



$205,471.98 



Respectfully Submitted, 

HOWARD L. JONES, Town Accountant 



116 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1945 

Assets 
Cash $ 107,940.10 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes : 

Levy of 1944 

Polls $ 24.00 

Personal Property 539.82 

Real Estate 6,167.44 



Levy of 1945 

Polls $ 180.00 

Personal Property 1,877.30 

Real Estate $17,813.22 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Levy of 1944 $ 123.63 

Levy of 1945 721.97 



6,731.26 



19.870.52 



845.60 



Tax Judgment 

Motor Vehicle Excise 502.62 

Tax Titles and Possessions 

Tax Titles $ 181.17 

Tax Title Possessions 346.21 



Departmental: 

State Aid $ 120.00 

Aid to Dependent Children 259.13 

Old Age Assistance 214.15 



527.38 



593.28 



State and County Aid to Highways 
State 1,267.81 

Debt Account 

County Tax 15.60 



$138,294.17 



Debt Accounts 



Net Funded Debt 13,000.00 



117 
Liabilities and Reserves 

County Dog Licenses $ 34.80 

Old Age Assistance Recovery 361.21 

Tailings Account 102.15- 

Withholding Tax 86.60 

Cemetery Land Fund 763.35 

Road Machinery Fund ' 410.58 

State Assessments: 

State Park Tax ' 33.01 

Appropriation Balances : 

Road Machinery Account $ 368.39 

Power tractor with attachments 600.00 

Fluorescent lighting 1,550.00 

Post War Public Works Committee 500.00 

Town Forest Committee 500.00 

3,518.39^ 

Trust Fund Income: 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund $ 27.19 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund . . 13.97 

41.16 

Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 5,189.41 

Overlays, Reserved for Abatements : 

Levy of 1944 $ 3,560.02 

Levy of 1945 1,145.95 

Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax $ 845.60 

Tax Title 527.38 

Departmental 593.28' 

State Aid to Highways 1,267.81 

3,234.0r 

Surplus Revenue 119,813.47 



4,705.97. 



$138,294.17 



Debt Accounts 

School House Addition Loan $ 12,000.00 

Fire Equipment Loan 1,000.00' 



$ 13,000.0Oj 



118 

REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR 

December 21, 1945 
To the Board of Selectmen: 

Mr. George S. Braman, Chairman 
Acton, Massachusetts. 
Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Acton for the period from July 
4, 1944, to October 9, 1945, mi^de in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the 
form of a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Ass- 
istant Director of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, • 

Director of Accounts 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

'State House, Boston. 

•Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an 
audit of the books and accounts of the town of Acton for 
the period from July 4, 1944, the date of the previous audit, 
to October 9, 1945, and report thereon as follows: 

The records of financial transactions of the several 
departments receiving or disbursing money or rendering 
bills for the town v/ere examined and checked for the period 
'Covered by the audit. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked in detail. The general and appro- 
priation ledger accounts were analyzed and proved, the nec- 
-essary adjusting entries were made, and a balance sheet 
showing the financial condition of the town as of October 
5, 1945 was prepared and is appended to this report. 

The recorded receipts were compared with the treas- 
urer's cash book and the payments as recorded were checked 
Tvith the treasurer's records and with the treasury warrants. 

The appropriations and transfers from the reserve fund, 
as recorded on the ledgers, were checked with the town 



119 



clerk's records of town meeting votes and with the finance- 
committee's records authorizing transfers from the reserve^ 
fund. 

Attention is directed to a tax judgment obtained by the 
town in 1935. If this judgment is determined to be uncol- 
lectible provision should be made therefor by vote of the 
town. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were-- 
analyzed and compared with the records of the several de- 
partments collecting money for the town, with the other 
sources from which money was paid into the town treasury^, 
and with the town accountant's books. The recorded pay- 
ments were checked with the warrants authorizing the dis- 
bursement of town funds and with the town accountant's, 
records. 

The treasurer's cash book footings were verified and 
the cash balance on October 9, 1945 was proved by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished by 
the bank of deposit and by actual count of the cash on hand. 

The payments on account of maturing debt and inter- 
est were proved with the amounts falling due and with the, 
cancelled securities on file. 

The treasurer's records of tax titles held by the town^ 
were examined and checked in detail. The amounts added 
to the tax title account were compared with the collector's 
records, and the tax titles held on October 9, 1945 were: 
listed. The records of the Registry of Deeds with respect, 
to tax title transactions for the period covered by the audit, 
were checked to the treasurer's records. 

The savings bank books and securities representing 
trust fund investments in the custody of the town treasurer 
were examiiiad. The income was approved and all trans- 
actions were verified. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were exam- 
ined and checked in detail. The taxes outstanding at the 
time of the previous examination and all subsequent com- 
mitments were audited. 

The collector's cash books were footed, the payments 
to the treasurer were checked to the treasurer's cash book, 
and the abatements as recorded were compared with the. 



120 

assessors' records of abatements granted. 

The outstanding taxes were listed, reconciled with the 
town accountant's ledger, and verified by mailing notices 
to a number of persons whose names appeared on the books 
as owing money to the town, the replies received thereto 
indicating that the accounts as listed are correct. 

The town clerk's records of dog and sporting licenses 
issued were audited. The payments to the State were veri- 
fied by comparison with the receipts on file, and the pay- 
ments to the town treasurer were checked with the treas- 
urer's cash book. The cash balance on October 9, 1945 was 
verified by actual count of the cash on hand. 

The accounts of the pubhc welfare, school, and ceme- 
tery departments, and all other departments collecting mon- 
ey or rendering bills for the town, were audited and recon- 
ciled with the treasurer's and the town accountant's records. 

The surety bonds of the officials required by law to 
jfurnish them were examined and found to be in proper 
:form. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance 
sheet, are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's 
and of the collector's cash, summaries of the tax, tax title, 
arid departmental accounts, as well as tables showing the 
trust fund transactions. 

For the cooperation received from the several town 
officials during the progress of the audit, I wish on behalf 
^f my assistants and for myself to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 
Assistant Director of Accounts 



121 
RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 



Balance July 4, 1944 $ 43,290.67 

Receipts July 4 to 

December 31, 1944, 157,461.47 

$200,712.14 
Payments July 4 to December 31, 

1944, per warrants, $107,129.83 

Balance December 31, 1944, 93,582.31 

§200,712.14 

Balance January 1, 1945, $ 93,582.31 

Receipts January 1 to October 9. 

1945, 120,397.21 

1213,979.52. 
Payments January 1 to October 9, 

1945, per warrants, $151,069.01 

Balance October 9, 1945: 
The First National 

Bank of Ayer, $43,991.94 

Cash in office, 

verified, 18,918.57 

62,910.51 

$213,979.52: 



The First National Bank of Ayer 

Balance October 9, 1945, per 

statement, $ 46,152.03 

Balance October 9, 1945, per 

check register, $43,991.94 

Outstanding checks October 9, 

1945, per hst, 2,160.09 

$ 46,152.0a: 



122 
RECONCILIATION OF COLLECTOR'S CASH 

Cash balances October 9, 1945, per tables: 

Poll taxes 1944, $ 4.00 

Personal taxes 1944, 58.81 

Real estate taxes 1944, 1,157.97 

Poll taxes 1945, 60.00 

Personal taxes 1945, 841.29 

Heal estate taxes 1945, 10,892,27 

Motor Vehicle excise taxes 1944, 23.22 

Mbtor vehicle excise taxes 1945, 253.48 
Interest on taxes: 

Poll taxes 1944, $ .11 

Personal taxes 1944, 2.07 

Real estate taxes 1944 46.09 

48.27 
Interest on motor vehicle 

excise taxes 1944, 1.13 

'Costs on poll taxes 1944, .35 



Cash on hand October 9, 1945: 
The Concord 

National Bank, $11,244.37 

Cash in office, 

verified, 2,092.06 

$13,336.43 
Cash variation October 9, 1945, 4.36 



$ 13,340.79 



$13,340.79 



The Concord National Bank 

"Balance October 9, 1945, per 

statement, $30,957.53 

Balance October 9, 1945, per 

check book, $11,244.37 

lOutstanding checks October 9, 

1945, per Hst, 19,713.16 

$30,957.53 



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126 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 

During 1945, the same as previous war years, the work of 
the Middlesex County Extension Service was devoted to those 
projects which would help in the winning of the war. 

The fact that Middlesex Countj^ farmers increased their 
production about one-third over pre-war years is proof that 
everyone did his part in the food production program. Labor 
on farms was the critical factor in food production and a great 
deal of the time was" spent on finding labor and making it avail- 
able. In addition to local help foreign labor was imported from 
Jamaica and Newfoundland and prisoners of Avar were used on 
market gardening and fruit farms. 

Selective Service Boards co-operated fully in the whole 
program by trying to allow men to remain on farms who were 
absolutely essential. The Extension Service checked these 
farms and made reports to the local Selective Service Boards- 

The usual assistance was given, such as assistance to 
Victt)ry gardeners, sending out information on spray schedules 
for fruit growers and market gardeners and keeping farmers 
informed as to the regulations on farm equipment, price sched- 
ules, especially for eggs and poultr^^, fruits and vegetables, and 
help with any emergency cases upon personal request. 

With the homemakers of the county, food preservation and 
conservation in the home Avere the main projects. Information 
was given regarding successful methods of canning anil freez- 
ing of fruits and vegetables as well as meats. Due to the severe 
shortage of clothing materials demonstrations Avere continued 
on clothing renovation, shortcuts in clothing construction and 
the maintenance of scAving machines. To help Avith general 
nutrition demonstrations Avere given in the best use of vege- 
tables, cooking Avith a minimum amount of sugar and prepara- 
tion of community meals. 

Boys and girls Avere encouraged as usual to carry on 4-H 
Club Avork and developed such projects as food production, food 
preservation, clothing construction and meal preparation. This 
Avork was made possible only hy volunteer local leaders and the 
active interest of local committee members and parents. 

The Middlesex County Extension Service shares Avith other 
organizations, farmers, homemakers, young people, as Avell as 
those organizations interested in agriculture, the satisfaction of 
knoAving that during Avar years for the most part agricultural 
products of the area were available in sufficient . amounts so 
that there Avas actually no food shortage in any toAvn Avithin the 
county.. 

(Signed) HARLAN E. TUTTLE, 

Town Director. 



127 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
THE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

For the Year Ending Dec. 31, 1945 
ORGANIZATION 
School Committee 

Mrs. G. Howard Reed, Chairman Term expires 1946 

Mr. Waldo J. Flint Term expires 1946 

Mrs. J. Henry Engman Term expires 1947 

Mrs. Arthur Fraser Term expires 1947 

Mr. Herman H. Gatchell Term expires 1948 

Mr. Richard A. Lowden Term expires 1948 

Meetings of the School Committee 
Regular meetings of the school committee are held the 
third Monday of each month in the high school at 8:00 P. M. 
Exceptions may be made during July and August. 

Superintendent 

Richard B. Greenman 

Office— High School Building, Telephone 110 

School Physician Ernest A. Mayell, M. D. 

East Acton, Telephone 345-3 

School Nurse Mrs. Simon D. Taylor, R. N. 

North Acton, Telephone 33-22 

Attendance Officer Thomas F. Kiley 

North Acton, Telephone 110 
Custodians : 

High School, Tel. 110 Thomas F. Kiley 

Center School, Tel. 86 W. Burton Harvey 

South School, Tel. 445 Kenneth Harvey 

West School, Tel. 105 Ernest G. Banks 

Tentative Calendar for 1946 
January 2 — Schools open. 
February 15 — Schools close. 
February 25 — Schools open. 
April 12 — Schools close. 
April 22 — Schools open. 
May 30 and 31— Holiday (Memorial Day). 
June 7 — Elementary schools close. 
June 14 — High school graduation. 
June 21 — High school closes.' 



128 

School Year 1946-1947 

September 4 — High school opens. 

September 9 — Elementary schools open. 

October 25 — Teachers' Convention. 

November 11 — Holiday (Armistice Day). 

November 28 and 29 — Thanksgiving Recess 

December 20 — Schools close at noon. 

1947 

January 2 — Schools open. 

February 21 — Schools close. 

March 3 — Schools open. 

April 18 — Schools close. 

April 28 — Schools open. 

May 30— Holiday (Memorial Day). 

June 6 — Elementary schools close. 

June 13 — High school graduation. 

June 20 — High school closes. 

No School Signal — All Schools All Day 
7:00 A. M., fire whistle in all precincts— 2-2-2-2. 
7:00-8:00 A. M., radio announcements over WBZ and WEEI. 

STANDING RULES OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

1. Admission to School (as amended by vote of the school 
committee November 2, 1943). 

Children shall not be admitted to the public schools un- 
less they are 5 years, 9 months of age on or before Septem- 
ber 1. Ordinarily, entrance must come during the first two 
weeks of school. All children entering for the first time must 
present birth and vaccination certificates. 

2. School Sessions 

The total length of sessions shall be 5l^ hours in the 
elementary schools and 6 hours in the high school, with 
sufficient recesses. The doors of schools shall not be opened 
to pupils except by the principals, or persons delegated by 
the principals. 

3. School Buses 

All pupils living a mile or more away from the schools 
they attend are entitled to bus transportation. Bus pupils 
must meet the bus schedule and, while on the bus, conduct 
themselves properly. 

4. Excuses for Absence and Tardiness (as amended by vote 



129 

of the school committee January, 1944). 

Pupils are expected to attend school regularly except for 
illness. They must present a written excuse signed by par- 
ent or guardian stating a definite reason for each absence 
or tardiness. , 

5. Detention 

Pupils may be detained after school in the afternoon 
not longer than 30 minutes in the elementary schools and 
for a longer period in the high school. 

6. Contagious Diseases, State Laws: Chapter 71, Section 
55: Chapter 76, Section 15: ^ , 

*'A child from a household where a person is ill with 
smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, or any other 
infectious or contagious disease, or from a household exposed 
to contagion from any such disease in another household, 
shall not attend any public school during such illness or ex- 
posure until the teacher of the school has been furnished 
with a certificate from the local board of health, school 
physician, or from the attending physician, stating that 
danger of conveying such disease by such child has passed." 

7. School Property 

Pupils shall be held responsible for books loaned to them 
by the school authorities and shall not mar or injure any 
form of school property. 

8. Fire Drill (as amended by vote of the school committee 
January, 1944). 

Fire Drills shall be held at least once a month in all 
schools. 



130 



TEACHERS IN SERVICE 
as of January 1, 1946 

Appt. Graduate of Home Address 
Center School 

•Dardena Berry (Mrs.) Prin. 1943Framingham Normal Acton 
Edith Hatch (Mrs.) 1945Fitchburg Normal Acton 

Mildred Roberts, B. S. E. 1945Boston University Maine 



South School 

Julia McCarthy, Prin. 
Florence Merriam 
Dorothy Hughes, B. S. E. 



1906Fitchburg Normal So. Acton 
1927 Fitchburg Normal So. Acton 
1945Fitchburg State Col. Fitchburg 



West School 

♦Carrie Wells (Mrs.) Prin. 
Helga Archer (Mrs.) 
Carolyn Douglas (Mrs.) 

B. S. E. 



1943 Fitchburg Normal So. Acton 
1943 Fitchburg Normal Stow 

1940Fitchburg State Col. So. Acton 



High School 

Richard B. Greenman, Prin. 

A. B., Ed.M. 
Walter W. Holt, Vice-Prin. 

of S.H.S., B.S., M.A. 
**William O'Connell, B. S. E. 

Vice-Prin. of J.H.S. 
Lydia Abbott, A. B. 
Mary Emerson, (Mrs.) B. S. 
Mary Hogan, B. S. E. 
Henry Hopkinson, L. L. B. 
Ann Horrigan, A. B. 
Marjorie Jones, B. S. 
Norma Leppanen, A. B. 
John Mitchell, B. S. E. 
Alfred Pullano, B. S. 
Marion Towne, A. B. 



1935Harvard University So. Acton 

1928Dartmouth College E. Acton 

1945 Boston University Salem 

1942 Colby College Maine 
1943Univ. of NewHamp. So. Acton 
1945 Boston University Springfield 

1930 Northeastern Law W. Acton 
1944 Regis College Arlington 

1931 Simmons College So. Acton 

1943 Colby College Ashburn'm 
1939 Fitchburg State Col. Worcester 
1946R. I. State College R. I. 

1921 Smith College Concord 



Supervisors 

Dorothy Beers, B. S. P. E. 
Jeanne Toohey (Mrs.) 
Charles K. Yeremian 
♦Acting Principal 
♦♦Acting Vice-Principal 



1943B. U.Sargent Col. Lexington 

1943 Mass. School of Art W. Concord 
1941Longy School of Mu. Watertown 



131 

REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Voters of Acton: 

The School Committee presents its report for the year 
1945 with that of the superintendent, which has been accept- 
ed by the committee. 

In March, Mr. Herman Gatchell was elected a new mem- 
ber and Mr. Richard Lowden re-elected for a term of three 
years. 

Three projects included in the 1945 budget have been 
completed, namely; Waterproofiing of the North Wall and 
Installation of Ventilator Fan in the High School, and Chain 
Link fence at the Centre School on Route 27. 

The contract for the Fluorescent Lighting in the re- 
mainder of the Grade School classrooms was awarded, but 
could not be carried out before the close of the year. 

Under general repairs quite a large sum was expended 
for wiring at the High School and necessary work on the 
heaters at the West and Centre Schools. 

The proposed budget for 1946 again calls for an increase. 
This may be explained in part as follows: automatic heat 
and needed equipment for the kitchen at the High School, 
maps and globes for the whole system and salary increases. 

A special article is again to be in the Town Warrant 
relative to the Elementary School situation. 

The committee still favors professional advancement 
and has set aside a certain amount for this purpose. 

With 1946, Miss Julia McCarthy, principal of the South 
Acton School, completes forty years of splendid service in 
the School Department of Acton. 

The Committee asks that you appropriate the sum of 

$75,165.50 for 1946. 

MARION C. REED; 

Chairman. 



132 
Comparison of Net Cost of Acton Schools 

Received by Town Treasurer on account of schools: 

1944 1945 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts: 

General School Fund, Part I 
(State aid on account of 
teachers' salaries) $ 4,820.00 $ 4,620.00 

Tuition and Transportation 

of State Wards (full) 1,214.45 449.05 

Vocational Education 39.06 

Leroy Mollison 136.46 

City of Boston, tuition of 

wards 150.89 

Town of Boxboro, tuition 3,127.92 2,502.40 

Town of Westford, tuition 334.31 424.39 

Acton High School 

Conant Library 8.71 13.67 

Ind. Arts Shop 22.87 121.85 

Miscellaneous 2.10 

Total Received $9,718.21 $ 8,269.92 

Appropriated for schools 64,252.88 71.710.50 

Spent from appropriation 62,745.89 68,97^.73 

Received by town treasurer 9,718.21 8,269.92 

Net cost „ $53,027.68 $60,709.81 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT BUDGET FOR 1946 

1945 1946 

Appropriated Proposed 

General Expenses 

Supt. of Schools, Clerk, (1945- 

46) and office expense $ 2,500.00 $ 3,100.00 

Expense of Instruction 

Salaries of teachers, principals, 

and supervisors 42,500.00 45,454.00 

Textbooks 2,500.00 1,400.00 

Stationery and Miscellaneous 

Supplies 1,400.00 3,400.00 



133 

Expenses of Operating School Plant 

Wages of Janitors 5,520.00 5,900.00 

Fuel 2,255.00 2,400.00 

Miscellaneous (power and jani- 
tor supplies) 2,200.00 2,680.00 

Maintenance 

Repairs 1,650.00 2,000.00 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Libraries 300.00 400.00 

Health 300.00 300.00 

Transportation 5,000.00 4,750.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

Sundries 100.00 100.00 

Vocational Education 100.00 300.00 

Outlays 600.00 2,750.00 

Unclassified 

Mass. Teachers* Retirement 

Board 217.50 231.50 

Waterproofing North Wall, 

High School 1,600.00 



Special Articles 

Article 15 — Balance due on in- 
stallation of fluorescent light- 
ing 77.80 

Article 16 — Fluorescent light- 
ing in elementary schools 1,550.00 

$70,370.30 
Appropriation Balance, 1944 $ 1,340.20 



$71,710.50 



$68,742.50 $75,165.50 



Stationery and miscellaneous supplies is a budget item 
including definite estimates for general paper and supply 
order, maps and globes long needed, test materials, physical 
education, laboratory, kitchen, shop, art, two typewriters, 
guidance materials, music department, book covers, and other 
expenses of instruction. Outlay includes definite figures 
on kitchen equipment, power mower, hand mower, auditorium 
screens, automatic heat in the high school, and an office file. 



134 

All anticipated expenses of the school department are 
included in a single budget, as recommended by the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Education. The amount requested 
is $75,165.50. 

Paid for Support for Year Ending December 31, 1945 

Superintendent, Salary $1,999.92 

Office and Traveling Expenses 643.00 

Total General Control $2,642.92 

Expenses of Instruction 

Supervisors' Salaries, Art, Music, Physical 

Education $4,604.00 

High School Principal's Salary -. 1,400.00 

High School Teachers' Salaries ., 21,369.49 

Elementary Principals' Salaries 5,292.50 

Elementary Teachers' Salaries 9,064.07 

$41,730.06 

High School Textbooks 763.24 

Elementary Textbooks 1,688.35 

High School Stationery and SuppHes 922.59 

Elementary Stationery and SuppHes 469.08 

$3,843.26 
High School Operating Expenses 

Janitor $2,673.28 

Fuel , 1,104.65 

Miscellaneous 1,148.61 

$4,926.54 
Elementary Operating Expenses 

Janitors $2,760.00 

Fuel 1,148.99 

Miscellaneous 779.68 

$4,688.67 

Total Operating Expenses $9,615.21 

High School Maintenance and Repairs $1,543.61 

Elementary Maintenance and Repairs 702.48 

Waterproofing North Wall, High School 1,558.00 



135 

Total Maintenance and Repairs $3,804.09 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health, High $ 125.00 

Health, Elementary 125.00 

Libraries 297.53 

Transportation 4,993.50 

Vocational Education 72.40 

Miscellaneous 95.26 

$5,708.69 

Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement Board $ 217.50 

Fluorescent Lighting 1,418.00 

Total Expended $68,979.73 

Unexpended Balance 1,180.77 

$70,160.50 

Appropriation Balance, Fluorescent Lighting 1,550.00 

$71,710.50 

Appropriation Balance, 1944 $1,340.20 

Appropriation 1945 77.80 

Appropriation 1945, Fluorescent Lighting 1,550.00 

Appropriation 1945 67,567.50 

Transfer 1,175.00 



$71,710.50 





IN MEMORIAM 




Acton Students Who Gave Their Lives 


in 1945 


Francis J 


Conroy 


Graduated 


in 1940 


Ansel R. 


Smart 


Graduated 


in 1935 


Robert B. 


Taylor 


Graduated 


in 1938 



136 

REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Committee of Acton, Massachusetts - 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

This is my fifth annual report, which covers the year 
ending December 31, 1945. 

Teachers 

The following new teachers were appointed in 1945 : 
Mrs. Edith Hatch 
Miss Mildred A. Roberts 
Miss Dorothy A. Hughes 
Miss Mary G. Hogan 
Mr. William L. O'Connell 
Mr. Alfred W. Pullano 

Improvement of Instruction 

Public education is undergoing considerable change, with 
the emphasis on general education for all children in all 
grades, and teachers thus face an increased responsibility. 
As they become informed of recent improvements in meth- 
ods, materials and curriculum, so the whole school depart- 
ment keeps pace with the needs of the students and of the 
community. 

In 1945 a number, of teachers took steps to improve 
instruction through in-service training: 
Miss Merriam and Miss McCarthy 

3-day conference at Massachusetts State College 
1-day Air Institute at Logan Airport 
Miss Hogan and Mr. O'Connell 

Boston University School of Education (fall term) 
Mr. Greenman 

Harvard Graduate School of Education (fall term) 

School Plant 

Improvements in 1945 include waterproofing the high 
school north wall, which has proved to be successful, new 
Center School fence, fan ventilator in high school boys' toilet, 
repairs to heating systems in the Center and West Schools, 
and additional radiation in the high school. 

Still waiting for attention are a number of problems in 



137 

the high school: automatic heat, leaks caused by roof flash- 
ings, redecoration of Blanchard Hall, insulation under the 
roof, improved lighting, and painting inside and out. 

SPECIAL ARTICLE IN 1946 

Again the School Committee bring to the attention of 
the town the need for study of the school housing problem : 
"To see if the town will vote to elect a School Building 
Committee consisting of the chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, and School Committee, 
with the Superintendent of Schools as Clerk of the 
School Building Committee without a vote, to survey 
the elementary school needs of the town, secure pre- 
liminary plans, and report on the advisability of re- 
modeling the present elementary schools, the estimated 
cost of a central 8-grade elementary school, including 
sub-primary department, and of three new 8-grade ele- 
mentary schools, including sub-primary department, 
one in each precinct ; and to see if the town will vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of 81,500.00 or any other 
sum for the use of the said School Building Committee, 
and instruct it to report to the town at the next annual 
or special town meeting, or act anything thereon." 

Textbooks 

A co-operative survey of textbooks was made with the 
help of the teachers, and new titles were selected after an 
examination of samples. The textbooks in general are up 
to date in all schools. Njew books this year include arith- 
metic, spelling, basic readers, supplementary readers, dic- 
tionaries, science, junior business training, algebra, health, 
junior >Tigh school literature and Ernglish, and French 
grammar. 

Scholarships 

Barbara Anne Barry, who entered Massachusetts State 
College, was awarded the $100 Acton High School Scholar- 
ship. Contributors to the fund in 1945 were the West Acton 
Woman's Club, the Acton Parent-Teacher Association, and 
the Class of 1945. The fund balance on December 31, 1945 
was $635.38. 

Nancy Anne Christofferson, who entered Simmons Col- 
lege, received the Acton Center Woman's Club Scholarship. 



138 

A new award, offered for the first time at the 1946 
graduation, is the Bausch and Lomb Science Medal. Seniors 
are invited to compete for five national Bausch and Lomb 
science scholarships of $1,500 each at the University of 
Rochester. 

Two seniors are competing for the national Pepsi-Cola 
Scholarships, which cover full tuition and most other ex- 
penses for four college years. 

Seniors are also encouraged to compete fpr the ten 
national George Westinghouse Scholarships of $1,850 each 
at Carnegie Institute of Technology. Examinations are given 
in all parts of the country and winners are selected for 
general ability, engineering aptitude, and leadership qualities. 

Health 

Classes in standard Red Cross First Aid and Home Nurs- 
ing were taught to junior and senior girls by Mrs. Charlotte 
Keyes and Mrs. Thelma Blood. Health classes with a modern 
text were taught by Miss Beers to all girls in Grades 7-12 
once a week starting in September. The boys also should 
have health instruction. It may be possible to have dental 
work carried on again in the schools if a dentist can be found. 
Seventy-nine high school students had chest X-rays in the 
fall under the direction of the Middlesex Health Association 
and the Acton Christmas Seal Committee. 

Correspondence Courses 

We have been commended by the State Department of 
Education and the U. S. Maritime Service Institute for ef- 
forts made to plan correspondence courses so that students 
in service can earn credit for their regular high school 
diploma. Plans for several former students are now in 
operation. 

Recommendations 

1. Long range study of the school department with 
relation to the growth of town. 

2. Separation of Grades 1 and 2 in the South and West 
Schools with a teacher for each grade because of 
large numbers. 

3. Modern maps and globes in all buildings in 1946. 

4. Greater efforts to meet the needs of all students in 
high school. 



139 

I wish to express my appreciation to School Committee 
members, taxpayers, teachers and all other school employees 
whose co-operative efforts have contributed to the well being 
of all the children in our public schools. 

Respectfully submitted 

RICHARD B. GRjEENMAN 

Superintendent of Schools 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 
Center School: 

The Center School opened this year with the following 
staff of teachers: Miss Roberts in Grades 1 and 2, Mrs. 
Johnson in Grades 3 and 4, and Mrs. Berry in Grades 5 and 
6. The total enrollment was 80. Because the upstairs 
rooms are small, crowded conditions prevail. The average 
number of children bringing lunches is 69. Again, due to 
the lack of space each teacher must have her own pupils 
in her room every^ day for lunch. The average number of 
children buying milk is only 22. The importance of good 
teeth, health and good work habits are being stressed. 

A small Estey organ has been purchased. It has proved 
very useful and is being enjoyed by the entire building. 
Fire drills are held monthly and Mr. Harvey has been most 
helpful in conducting them. 

A new chain link fence has been erected along the front 
of the building. This has helped to keep the children out 
of the street. 

A parents' night was held in November. The school 
was open for inspection at this time and the teachers were 
in their rooms to talk over problems with parents. 

I respectfully submit for consideration the following 
recommendations : 

1. A better heating system. 

2. More adequate playground equipment. 

3. Several new desks and chairs. 

4. More up-to-date toilet facilities. 

5. Fire escape from the rear of the building. 

We appreciate the fine co-operation given us by the 



140 

parents. We are very grateful to Miss Lothrop, our Li- 
brarian at the Center Library for helping the boys and girls 
to become interested in reading fine books. 

In closing I want to say that it is with a feeling of 
regret that I leave the Center School. My teaching years 
in Acton have been most happy ones and I wish at this time 
to thank every one for the many kindnesses shown me. 

Ruth Johnson, 
Acting Principal 

South School: 

I herewith submit my annual report for the South 
Acton School. The present enrollment is 101. Miss Mer- 
riam has 37 pupils in Grades 1 and 2. Miss McCarthy has 
45 pupils in Grades 3 and 4, and Miss Hughes has 29 pupils 
in Grades 5 and 6. Our average milk sale is 60 bottles per 
day and 58 pupils bring lunches regularly. Fire drills are 
held monthly. 

Miss Merriam and Miss McCarthy attended the three- 
day Teachers' Conference at Massachusetts State College 
at Amherst in June and also an interesting one day Air In- 
stitute held at Logan Airport under the direction of the 
Civil Aeronautics Administration. 

To date we have sold 1801.65 worth of War Savings 
Stamps in the year of 1945. I wish that more parents would 
consider the possibility of teaching children systematic sav- 
ing through the purchase of War Savings Stamps. The 
amount each week need not be large but could be steady, 
thereby establishing a habit of thrift early in life. 

Mr. Kenneth Harvey, the custodian, has changed the 
swing of doors on all toilets to permit safer entrance, and 
has made a second exit at the end of the girls' toilets. Both 
changes are a great improvement. He has also built a 
bicycle rack at the rear of the building. He has mounted 
the desks in the lunch room on strapping, making possible 
greater flexibility in the use of the room. 

Our chief undertaking this year has been the building 
of a platform or stage in the lunch room. Mr. Harvey has 
done all the work using material found in the building We 
must now find material for curtains and ways of earning 
money for folding chairs for the room. , 



141 

We have added to our playground equipment by pur- 
chasing 3 baseball gloves, 2 bats, 2 baseballs, 2 soft balls, 
1 volley ball, and 2 soccer balls. We subscribe to two maga- 
zines. The National Geographic and Story Parade. 

I respectfully submit for consideration the following 
recommendations — that, in the future, playground equip- 
ment be supplied by the school department, and that some 
means of obtaining hot water be installed in the building. 

In closing, I wish to thank my co-workers. Miss Mer- 
riam. Miss Hughes, and Mr. Harvey for their co-operation 
in all projects and assistance in supervision, and Mr. Green- 
man and the School Committee for understanding and sup- 
port. , 

Julia L. McCarthy, 

Principal 

West School: 

The West Acton School opened Sept. 10, 1945, with an 
enrollment of 95 pupils. The present enrollment is 92. There 
are three teachers in the building, Mrs. Wells in Grades 
1 and 2 has 30 pupils, Mrs. Archer in Grades 3 and 4 has 
33 pupils, and Mrs. Douglas in Grades 5 and 6 has 32 pupils. 
The average number of children bringing lunches at noon 
is 25. Fire drills are held monthly. An average of 35 
bottles of chocolate milk has been sold daily since October 
29. Teachers try to emphasize the importance of good 
health, clean talk, and good work habits. War stamps 
are being sold each Thursday and our aim is to increase 
the percentage each month. Junior Red Cross enrollment 
was 100%. With the money gained from the selling of 
seeds, a subscription for the National Geographic Magazine 
was given Grades 5 and 6. Playground equipment such 
as bats, balls, jump ropes and marbles were given Grades 
1, 2, 3, and 4. 

The book situation has been greatly improved by bring- 
ing up to date all basic readers, and by adding new sup- 
plementary readers, spelling, science, health, and arithmetic 
books. We appreciate the efforts of our superintendent 
and the school committee in making this possible. 

The mud situation on our playground was a serious one 
and has been greatly helped by the spreading of three loads^ 
of gravel. 



142 

A much needed radiator has been installed in the girls* 
basement. 

I respectfully submit for consideration the following 
recommendations : 

1. That a large closet be made to take care of books 
in Grades 5- and 6. 

2. That six new chairs and desks be added to Grades 
5 and 6. 

3. That we have more playground equipment. 

4. That two large chairs be purchased and placed in 
each classroom. 

The spirit of the teachers and pupils in the West School 
is excellent, and we wish at this time to express our sincere 
thanks to the parents for their splendid co-operation. 

Carrie F. Wells, 

Acting Principal 

REPORTS OF SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 
Conant Library 

Thirty-six new books and thirty-two magazine sub- 
scriptions have been secured for the Conant Library, and a 
number of donations have been received. 

Among these is a copy of Prose and Poetry of England 
donated by Mrs. Albert R. Jenks from the collection of her 
son, David. David was president of the Class of 1939 in 
Acton High School and was killed in action in World War II, 
October 1944. The Acton Memorial Library donated ten 
volumes of Abraham Lincoln, A History. Since the last 
report we have added a set of Compton's Pictured Encyclo- 
pedia to the library. 

The library is open almost every period each day for the 
use of the pupils who need to do reference work. 

We have received a number of recommendations from 
members of the faculty for books to be used in correlation 
with their classes. These books will be purchased after 
January 1. 

The library needs novels especially suited for the junior 
high pupils. We have supervised reading classes for the" 
seventh and eighth grades. A large percentage of the 
seventh grade pupils have finished the books in the junior 
high section before the end of the year. 

More biographical and autobiographical books are need- 



143 

ed for the high school pupils. 

The Acton High School Library Fund of $1500, left 
under the will of Miss Charlotte Conant has about |31 
available for history books. 

Ann Horrigan, 

Librarian 
Dramatics 

Since the last annual report, Acton High School has held 
its Declamation Contest and its Senior Play, *'A Little 
Honey", in addition to doing intensive work on a one-act 
play, ''Gray Bread", which was presented at the Massachu- 
setts Drama Festival. 

Plans are now being made for one-act plays to be pre- 
sented in the spring. 

Acton High School has no organized club for those in- 
terested in dramatics, though an active club could be a suc- 
cess if, in addition to other duties, one teacher had the time 
to work with the members during the fall months. 

It is difficult to act on such a small stage as ours, and 
the work would be far more interesting for the pupils if new 
lighting equipment and stage properties were added to what 
the school now has. 

Lydia Abbott 

The Acton Junior High School pupils presented a one- 
act play, ''Homework" to the student body in February. 
The play was given again at the Congregational Church 
party in March. We are planning to present another short 
play again this year. 

Anne Horrigan 
Music 

My fifth annual report as Supervisor of Music in Acton 
Pub?ic Schools is herewith submitted. 

I wish to recommend again, as in my last year's report, 
the necessity of a combined elementary system. I do not 
think it is necessary to list the reasons, as they appeared in 
detail in my 1944 annual report. 

In order that my department may progress satisfactor- 
ily, it is of the utmost importance that any new elementary 
classroom teacher engaged should be capable of teaching 
music. 

The proceeds of our annual Spring Festival Concert 



144 

were used to purchase the following items: trumpet, phono- 
graph records for the elementary schools, and repairing of 
school owned instruments, and six music stands. 

A whist-bridge party was held in November of this 
year when $125 was raised for the purpose of buying uni- 
forms for the band. Plans are in progress for another ac- 
tivity for this purpose. 

A class of drum Majors was organized in November, 
but because it was held after school, it created the problem 
of transportation. For this reason the drum major class 
had to be dissolved, as pupils found it difficult to walk home 
on cold wintry days. 

Band membership totals 24 students. 

Orchestra membership totals 33 students. 

Our instrumental organization is a great morale builder 
in our schools. 

Public Performances 

a. Annual Music Festival 

b. Annual instrumental class concert 

c. High school orchestra performed for the graduation 
exercises. 

d. High school band performed at the bridge-whist 
party. 

e. High school chorus, band, and orchestra performed 
at several school assemblies. 

The morale of all groups is excellent. I wish to express 
my most sincere appreciation to the superintendent and 
school committee, to the townspeople, and school organi- 
zation for the splendid co-operation extended to me. They 
have all contributed to the success of the music program. 

Charles K. Yeremian 

Art 

The art course started again this year In all grades with 
color and line studies. There have been several cut-out 
lessons which involve creative ability and design. The res- 
ponse in some of the representation lessons was most satis- 
factory as to 'originality and technique in the high school 
and grades. 

Poster awards were won and sent to us by the Mass. 
Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 

Students have a great fondness for the pastel work, 



145 

so we will do more with them soon. A finger paint set 
has been ordered recently and we should have some stu- 
dents who will acquire skill with them. 

Two of the very large water color murals made by grade 
5 and 6 in Acton Center are being saved with the hope that 
they might be made permanent with the use of shellac. 

Jeanne Toohey 
Commercial Department 

For the school year 1944-45 this department was under 
the direction of Miss Margaret Boornazian. During this 
time the average rate of speed for one-minute timed tests 
was fifty words a minute without error and the maximium 
rate attained by one pupil was ninety-four words a minute. 
The shorthand classes were taught exclusively as a skilled 
course including much theory work. The students satis- 
factorily completing the first-year course were advanced to 
second year where they were taught more theory and com- 
pletely skilled work. 

The pupils showing ability in typing were taught the 
use of the mimeograph so that this phase of commercial 
work could be put to use in doing the duplicating work of the 
school, including production of the school newspaper. 

The many other courses w^ere taught in a practical 
way so that the pupils can apply what they learn when they 
enter the business world. They were also used as back- 
ground material with which to fill out the required skilled 
subjects. 

This department would be improved by the addition 
of a dictophone and a gelatin duplicator so that more office 
practice work could be taught. 

Mary Hogan 
Home Economics 

Despite wartime conditions the Home Economics De- 
partment has carried on. 

In the sewing classes the difficulty has been the lack 
of yard goods in the stores. Grain bags have helped is to 
meet this emergency. 

The eighth grade cooking classes have been too large 
for the limited equipment in the kitchen which serves both 
cooking classes and cafeteria at the same time. 

Financially the cafeteria is still self-sustaining. Due 



- 146 

to the increase in the amount of orders, which has tripled 
during the year, we have managed to maintain the same 
scale of prices in face of the rising cost of food. 

It is to be recommended, however, that when appliances 
are again available, adequate equipment be installed in the 
kitchen to meet the present needs of both cooking class and 
cafeteria. 

Mary L. Emerson 
Industrial Arts 

The work in the Industrial Arts Department will under- 
go a few changes this year. The shortages of materials 
and equipment which necessitated the curtailing of work 
in metals as well as woods, during the "war years", will be 
overcome, and such courses as patternmaking, founding, 
sheetmetal work, and plastics will return on a greater scale. 

The department is fast expanding to meet the needs of 
boys and girls in understanding the industrial world and 
some of its functions. However, there is a clamor on the 
part of many students for a course in automobile mainten- 
ance. Unless it be on a theoretical basis, present shop fa- 
cilities are inadequate for teaching such a course. The in- 
stallation of a motor, chassis, or other equipment would 
overcrowd areas now being used to their full capacity. 
Should more space be made available, it is recommended 
that such a course be undertaken on a high school level. 

The machine shop course would be greatly enhanced 
were castings available for finishing. The patternmaking 
and founding course was designed to make such castings, 
but due to the lack of a furnace for melting metals such as 
brass, copper, or aluminum, its objectives have been only 
partially answered. The purchase of such a furnace which 
can be used for heat treatment of metals, too, is highly 
recommended. 

The function of welding in a machine shop course can- 
not be over-stressed. Equipment for welding should be 
requisitioned, a portable type, either oxy-acetylene or elec- 
tric is recommended. 

Any contribution that local industry can make to fur- 
ther the development of the industrial arts program would 
be greatly appreciated. Donations of equipment, materials, 
or supplies, and short talks or discussions by local men of 



147 

« 

industry would not only create a better understanding of 
local occupational opportunities, but would also enrich our 
occupational guidance program. 

During the past few j^ears, the department has taken 
long strides in the field of industrial arts education. The 
foresight and co-operation of the superintendent, the school 
committee, and the townspeople in granting the needs of this 
important phase of general education is commendable. 

John Mitchell 

Health and Physical Education, High School Girls and 
Elementary Schools 

The physical education program for high school girls 
has followed the same aims and obpectives as last year. 
With two periods each week, emphasis was placed on activi- 
ties which met the needs of all students and had a carry- 
over value in their future life. 

The extra-curricular sports, field hockey, and basket- 
ball, offered an opportunity for keen competition for the 
more athleticly inclined students, while badminton, deck 
tennis, horseshoes and darts provided recreational oppor- 
tunities for all. 

A more extensive health program was added this year 
in the high school. Each girl had one theory class a week. 
Most grades had a new health text book from which to study 
and a complete series has been oi^dered. 

At present the most important need is better equipment. 

1. Tumbling mats 

2. Net standards 

3. Ping pong table 

4. Girls' shower room needs raised platform or matting 
from dressing room to showers. 

The elementary schools program emphasized good pos- 
ture and good sportsmanship indirectly through games and 
exercises and directly through the use of health charts and 
regular inspections. 

Physical Efducation Program for High School Boys 

The physical education program for boys at Acton High 
School has stressed physical fitness for each and every in- 
dividual in the school. This year we have been fortunate 



148 

in having excellent weather until early December, which 
made it possible to hold classes outdoors. Since the sta- 
tistics have been released on the tremendous amount of men 
rejected for military service, we have attempted to improve 
the posture and carriage of the individual. The exercises 
approved by the armed forces have been included in the 
class programs. Relay races and hardening exercises, to 
improve the wind and physical defects of the students, have 
been stressed. Basketball and baseball fundamentals have 
been taught to all grades from seven through twelve. 

In the athletic department Acton High School was not 
represented by a football team this year. The basketball 
team was called out and a squad of twenty-three men re- 
ported. This year only two veterans returned, so a new 
team had to be organized. The interest and spirit of both 
the team and students was excellent and we all look for- 
ward to a very successful season. Since we were not in a 
league, independent teams have been scheduled from sur- 
rounding towns. The foundation is being laid for a winning 
team for the next four years, since only four boys will grad- 
uate in June 1946. 

We all look forward to the spring when the baseball 
team will be called out, as a better than average team is 
expected, since there are a number of holdovers from last 
year's club. 

I wish to thank the superintendent and the faculty 
manager, and my fellow teachers for their excellent support 
and co-operation. 

My recommendations are as follows: 

1. A full time physical education instructor to super- 
vise the health and physical education in both the Junior 
and Senior High Schools. 

2. Arrange the physical training program so each stu- 
dent will have three or four periods a week, instead of a 
double period once a week. 

3. A regulation to have each boy own or obtain a gym 
suit and a pair of sneakers, just as soon as they are avail- 
able to the public. 

4. The teaching of fundamentals of all sports in the 
Junior High School, including an intra-mural program. 

5. The return of a football team to represent the high 



149 

school, and setting up the gymnasium with the equipment 
needed to carry on physical training indoors. 

William L. O'Connell 

Acton High Athletic Association 

It is with pleasure that I submit my report of the acti- 
vities of athletics at the Acton High School. 

As you have observed in the local papers, from time 
to time, the publicity agents have kept you fully informed as 
to the success of our athletic teams. Last winter the boyss 
and girls played in the Eastern Division of the Wachusettt 
Basketball League with a great deal of pride and pleasure*. 
Later on in the season the boys played baseball. 

Football was omitted this fall on account of the smalll 
number of boys eligible to play. The girls, as usual, played 
hockey with other schools. 

This winter the boys' and girls' basketball teams have 
a well rounded schedule to play with schools of their own. 
size. 

Again this fall, through the co-operation of students, 
we were able to increase our treasury account a little over 
?200.00 by selling 8683.00 worth of periodicals. The money 
raised by the association in selling magazines, receipts of 
games, arid sale of tonic are the sole financial support of 
the equipment, transportation, referees, and other expenses 
of all Acton High School athletic teams. Our balance sheet, 
on December 17, 1945 was $278.46. 

Recommendation: That a general reconditioning of the^ 
auditorium be undertaken so that it may be adapted for 
athletics, plays, a hall, etc. with least delay possible. 

Walter W. Holt: 



150 
School Membership and Attendance 

Membership by Age and Grade, October 1, 1945 
Age 



Boys 




























Gr. 5 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 Ttl 


1 25 


2 


1 






















28 


2 1 


22 


1 


1 




















25 


3 


7 


14 


4 




















25 


4 




3 


13 


5 


1 
















22 


5 






■ 7 


11 


4 


1 


1 












24 


6 








1 


5 


1 


1 












8 


Ungraded 






1 


3 


1 


1 














6 


7 










6 


11 


2 


3 










22 


8 












5 


7 


3 


4 








19 


^ 














6 


11 


4 


4 






25 


10 
















5 


15 


4 






24 


11 


















2 


8 


4 




14 


12 




















2 


2 




4 



246 

















Age 


















Girls 
































Gr. 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 Ttl 


1 


18 


6 


























24 


2 


5 


12 


1 
























-18 


3 




9 


10 


2 






















21 


4 






7 


19 


3 




















29 


5 








5 


16 




1 
















22 


6 










6 


15 


4 


1 














26 


7 










1 


9 


15 


1 


1 












27 


8 














6 


16 


2 


2 










26 


9 
















9 


8 


5 










22 


10 


















5 


13 


2 


1 






21 


11 




















5 


11 


3 






19 


12 






















5 


9 




1 


15 



270 



151 



REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 



Mr. Richard B. Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Dear Sir: 



I herewith submit my annual report as school physician. 

Special examinations were held at the high school for stu-- 
dents taking part in hockey and sports. 

Diphtheria clinics were held in May and early June. 

The yearly physical examinations were completed in No- 
vember. 

We have been most fortunate in not having any epidemics 
this past year. 

The general physical condition of the school population is 
good in my opinion. 

The cooperation of the superintendent, nurse, teachers, and 
townspeople is very much appreciated. 



Respectfully submitted,, 

E. A. Mayell, M.D. 



152 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 



Mr. Richard Greenman 
Superintendent of Schools 
Acton, Massachusetts 
Dear Sir: 

Report for the school year ending December 1945 follows: 

The annual school physical examinations were made in the 
fall by Doctor Mayell. All pupils taking part in competitive sports 
>were examined before the start of games. 

The Diphtheria Clinic was held in May; Schick tests given to 
.50 pupils and 93 inoculations against diphtheria were given. 

Pre-school conferences were held in May w^hen children en- 
tering school in September were examined and recommendations 
for defects to be corrected before the start of. the school year were 
made. 

There has been the usual run of communicable diseases. Chil- 
dren with colds should be kept at home during the acute stages 
of a cold. A cold is often the forerunner of something more ser- 
ious and if the child is kept at home others are not exposed and 
the child himself given a better chance for less time out of school. 

In October the Middlesex County T.B. League together with 
our town association's co-operation took X-rays of 223 towns- 
people, 79 of whom were high school students. The report has not 
yet been received from these X-rays. It is, however, a big step 
in the way of progress. 

In closing, may I thank the teachers and the superintendent 
for their ever tolerant cooperation and help? 



Respectfully submitted, 

Lillian F. Taylor, R.N. 



153 
ACTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Graduation Program 

June 15, 1945 

Entrance March 

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar 

Invocation 

TPie Reverend Bernard M. Kane 
Salutatory 

Barbara Ann Clemence 
Senior Quartet 

Laudamus Protheroe. 

Nancy Anne Christofferson 
Lorraine Lillian Kennie 
John Cleveland Howard 
Alexander Dominic Marini 
Barbara Anne Barry, Accompanist 
Address 

Thomas L. Lusk 

Chaplain (Capt.) U.SA. 
Piano Solo 

Waltz, Op. 64, No. 2 Chopin-- 

Barbara Anne Barry 
Presentation of Class Gift 
John Lawrence Tucker 

President of Senior Class 
Trumpet Solo 

Lily Polka Vander Cook 

Evelyn Ruth Danielson 
Valedictory 

Nancy Anne Christofferson 
Presentation of Awards 

Mr. Walter W. Holt, Vice-Principal 
Mr. Richard B. Greenman, Superintendent of Schools 
Presentation of Diplomas 

Mrs. G. Howard Reed, Chairman of School Committee- 
Class Song 

Words: Beverly June Dagenais 
Music: Lorraine Lillian Kennie - 



154 



TS'ational Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance 
Benediction 

The Reverend Henning E. Danielson 
Recessional March 

Spirit of America 

Reception to Graduates 



Underwood 



GRADUATES, 1945 



Roger Alan Backman 
**Milton Osborne Baker 
*Anne Lorraine Ballard 
"^Barbara Anne Barry 

Warren Fredrick Birch 

'Sandra Lee Burroughs 

iSylvia Lee Burroughs 

Helen Elizabeth Christofferson 
*Nancy Anne Christofferson 
*Barbara Ann Clemence 

^Catherine Elizabeth Cullinane 
-'Theresa Marie Curley 
**Beverly June Dagenais 

*Honor Students 
'**In the Service 



^Evelyn Ruth Danielson 
Nancy Eleanor Durkin 
Richard Avery Gallant 
^Doris Eleanor Hartwell 
Alice Pearl Higgins 
John Cleveland Howard 
Lorraine Lillian Kennie 
Alexander Dominic Marini 
Doris Marie Penney 
^Barbara Lillian Reed 
Joseph Michael Sweeney 
John Lawrence Tucker 



155 
AWARDS 

Acton Center Woman's Club Scholarship 
Nancy Anne Christofferson 

Acton High School Scholarship of $100 

To a deserving and meritorious student for the first year 
in a university, college, or technical school 
Barbara Anne Barry 

Improvement Prizes 

Two $25 war bonds awarded by Mrs. Robert A. Reid to a 

boy and girl in the senior class who have shown the greatest 

scholastic improvement in the last four years, and who have 

shown a co-operative attitude through their service to the 

school. 

Lorraine Lillian Kennie 

Richard Avery Gallant 

Rensselaer Medal 

To a young man in the graduating class who has done the 
best work in mathematics and science throughout his pre- 
paratory course. 
Roger Alan Backman 

National Honor Society Pins 

The top 15 per cent of the graduating class 
Nancy Anne Christofferson 
Barbara Ann Clemence 
Evelyn Ruth Danielson 
Doris Eleanor Hartwell 

American Legion Medals 

To the best all around boy and girl in the senior class as^ 
judged for scholarship, loyalty, and achievement 
Doris Eleanor Hartwell 
John Cleveland Howard 

Reader's Digest Award 

A year's subscription to the Reader's Digest in recognition 
of past accomplishment and in anticipation of unusual, 
achievement to come. 
Nancy Anne Christofferson 



156 

Crood Citizenship Certificate and Pin 

Awarded by the National Society of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution to a Good Citizen of Acton High 
School for the current year, who has demonstrated through 
her entire course qualities of dependability, leadership, ser- 
vice, and patriotism to an outstanding degree. 
Barbara Anne Barry 

Washington and Franklin Medal 

Awarded by the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution for excellence in the study of United 
States History. - • 

Barbara Ann Clemence 



INDEX 



Assessors 58 

Board of Health 60 

Cemetery Commissioners 67 

Dog Officer * 41 

Elizabeth White Fund 59 

Finance Committee 81 

Fire Department 65 

Forest Warden 41 

Inspector of Animals 72 

Librarian 's H^eport 44 

Middlesex County Extension Service 126 

Moth Superintendent 43 

Police Department 64 

Post-War Public Works Committee 56 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 42 

Selectmen's Report 39 

Schools : 

Budgets for 1946 132 

Graduation Program 153 

Organization 127 

School Committee 131 

School Nurse 152 

School Phj^sician 151 

Superintendent 136 

Teachers 130 



State Auditor's Report 118 

Superintendent of Streets .^ 40 

Tax Collector 68 

Town Accountant 93 

Town Clerk's Report 28 

Births 29 

Marriages * 31 

Deaths 35 

Non-Resident Burials 36 

Dog Licenses 39 

Jury List (Revised) 1945 38 

Town Forest Committee 92 

Town Meeting (Abstract), March 12, 1945 15 

Town Nurse 72 

Town. Officers 10 

Treasurer's Report 73 

Tree Warden 42 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund 59 

Welfare Department 62 

Warrant, Monday, March 11, 1946 3 

Workmen 's Compensation Agent 40 



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/REFEREK^CE BOOK °^^ ^^^^ 

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